Australia: Shorten softens language on electric cars - - PressFrom - Australia
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AustraliaShorten softens language on electric cars

04:50  30 april  2019
04:50  30 april  2019 Source:   msn.com

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Bill Shorten concedes Labor's ambitious electric car targets may never be achieved. The federal opposition wants half of all new cars sold in Australia by 2030 to be electric . He has ruled out reducing import taxes on electric cars or providing incentives for household

Bill Shorten ’s pitch for PM: Shorten softens language on electric cars Opposition Leader Bill Shorten concedes Labor's Bill Shorten concedes Labor's ambitious electric car targets may never be achieved. The federal opposition wants half of all new cars sold in Australia by 2030 to be electric .

Shorten softens language on electric cars© AAP Images Opposition Leader Bill Shorten concedes Labor's 50 per cent target for new car sales by 2030 may not be achieved.

Bill Shorten concedes Labor's ambitious electric car targets may never be achieved.

The federal opposition wants half of all new cars sold in Australia by 2030 to be electric.

"That doesn't mean that will happen," Mr Shorten told Nova Radio in Perth on Tuesday.

He has ruled out reducing import taxes on electric cars or providing incentives for household charging stations.

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Shorten softens language on electric cars

Instead, Labor's plan hinges on paying for more public battery charging stations and imposing buying controls on government fleets.

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Opposition Leader Bill Shorten concedes Labor's 50 per cent target for new car sales by 2030 may not be achieved.

Bill Shorten ’s pitch for PM: Shorten softens language on electric cars Opposition Leader Bill Shorten concedes Labor's Bill Shorten concedes Labor's ambitious electric car targets may never be achieved. The federal opposition wants half of all new cars sold in Australia by 2030 to be electric .

Shorten softens language on electric cars
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"The good news is under Labor policies you can do what you like," Mr Shorten said.

"We're happy for you to keep buying the cars you have, we just want to extend the range and the choice."

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Bill Shorten more genuine in debate: body language expert.
Bill Shorten appeared more genuine, unscripted and prime ministerial in the final leaders’ debate last night than he had on previous occasions, according to a body language and speech expert. Mr Shorten had visibly teared up during a press conference earlier in the day, reacting to a Daily Telegraph story about his mother. And Michael Kelly, a body language expert, believes that emotional side to the Leader of the Opposition was carried into the debate. © AAP Bill Shorten and Scott Morrison during the third Leaders' Debate at the National Press Club in Canberra.

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