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AustraliaFederal election 2019: RMIT ABC Fact Check runs the rule over Scott Morrison and Bill Shorten's second debate

16:50  03 may  2019
16:50  03 may  2019 Source:   abc.net.au

Comment: If Morrison wants to stay PM, he has to do much better in Victoria

Comment: If Morrison wants to stay PM, he has to do much better in Victoria This is the state that is still the biggest block in Morrison's tough road back to the Lodge as the PM channels his inner Tony Abbott.

By RMIT ABC Fact Check . Posted FriFriday 3 MayMay 2019 at 11:35amFriFriday 3 MayMay 2019 at 11:35am, updated FriFriday 14 JunJune 2019 at 1:24amFriFriday 14 JunJune 2019 at 1:24am. Scott Morrison and Bill Shorten at the second leaders' debate , held in Brisbane.

Lachlan Murdoch has taken over the running of News Corp in Australia from his father Rupert Murdoch, according to an insider. Fear, service, vision. Scott Morrison and Bill Shorten during the third leaders' debate . ( ABC News: Matt Roberts). Mr Morrison said he was not interested in power

Taxation and the economy featured prominently in the second leaders' debate of the 2019 federal election, held this time in Brisbane.

Federal election 2019: RMIT ABC Fact Check runs the rule over Scott Morrison and Bill Shorten's second debate© Sky News Scott Morrison and Bill Shorten at the second leaders' debate, held in Brisbane. Prime Minister Scott Morrison and Opposition Leader Bill Shorten also clashed over climate change and health, among other things.

RMIT ABC Fact Check has previously examined some of the key issues touched on by both leaders. This is what we found.

Negative gearing and capital gains

Federal election 2019: RMIT ABC Fact Check runs the rule over Scott Morrison and Bill Shorten's second debate© ABC News Taxable income is a poor indicator of household wealth. The debate involved clashes between the leaders in relation to Labor's plans to curb capital gains tax concessions and negative gearing.

Morrison and Shorten fail to deliver knock-out in first leaders' debate

Morrison and Shorten fail to deliver knock-out in first leaders' debate The Prime Minister and Opposition Leader covered the hot topics of the election: the economy and wages growth, taxes and franking credits, climate change and asylum seekers. Mr Morrison was clearly far more at ease with the format, smiling and sitting comfortably, while Mr Shorten shifted in his seat and rigidly stared into the camera. © AAP Scott Morrison and Bill Shorten have debated in Perth. Mr Shorten was even told by the moderators that he did not have to look "directly down the barrel of the camera". "You can speak directly to the Prime Minister.

While Scott Morrison goes for character assassinations, Bill Shorten prefers dismissiveness. Despite the fact voters elect their local member (rather than picking the party leader they want to run the joint), the focus on the personality of the prime minister and opposition leader is front and centre

So, Fact Check asked two of Australia' s leading tax experts to examine the figure. In the lead-up to the election , RMIT ABC Fact Check has been working hard to sift through the spin and Read more about the federal election : Analysis: Scott Morrison turned Labor strategy into the perfect weapon

Labor is promising to reduce the discount on capital gains so that 75 per cent of a capital gain on most asset sales will be subject to tax. (It is currently 50 per cent.)

Labor would also restrict negative gearing of property to new houses from January 1, 2020.

The Morrison Government claims the policies would not only harm the economy, but also taxpayers on low-to-middle incomes such as teachers, nurses and police.

Fed ALP downplays Clive Palmer preferences

Fed ALP downplays Clive Palmer preferences Federal Labor frontbencher Anthony Albanese says opposition MPs may be asking voters to put Clive Palmer second this election because it won't sway the result. A donkey vote is when a person numbers the boxes in order straight down the ballot paper. In Franklin, where Labor's candidate is listed second from the bottom, this is effectively what its how-to-vote card recommends, starting with incumbent MP Julie Collins as number one. But in Clark, Labor recommends its voters jump all over the ballot paper.

RMIT ABC Fact Check . Posted MonMonday 29 AprApril 2019 at 1:02pmMonMonday 29 AprApril 2019 at 1 Opposition Leader Bill Shorten won the audience vote in the first leaders' debate in Perth Fact Check looked into public hospital funding in the month before Mr Morrison assumed the prime

— RMIT ABC Fact Check (@ABCFactCheck) April 29, 2019 . Voter John Hoolahan said he was still tossing up which way he was going to vote, but he said he thought Mr Morrison "was not on his game" in the debate . "I still want to know where all this money is coming from that (Mr Shorten ' s ) going to

In fact checks published in February and November, we found such claims to be misleading — mainly because taxable income is a poor indicator of household wealth.

Social media

Federal election 2019: RMIT ABC Fact Check runs the rule over Scott Morrison and Bill Shorten's second debate© Supplied Despite the promises of companies such as Facebook, using technology to take down content automatically is still out of reach. On the issue of social media responsibility, Mr Shorten said the big platforms should be more accountable for published content.

In the wake of the Christchurch massacre, Fact Check looked at a claim by Mr Morrison that social media companies could screen hate content with algorithms.

We found this was "wishful thinking".

In fact, the big platforms already use algorithms to find hate content and the people who share it — but the approach has its limits.

Experts said using technology to take down content automatically was still out of reach, despite the promises of companies such as Facebook.

Morrison promises $1b for new navy ships

Morrison promises $1b for new navy ships Scott Morrison is promising $1 billion to build three naval ships in Western Australia if the coalition wins the election as well as money for cyber-security.

Scott Morrison and Bill Shorten clash over climate change and tax breaks in a final debate less than two weeks out from the federal election .

These moments were significant not for the impact they'll have on voters — who are probably over debates , if not the whole election — but for what they told us about the leaders, writes Michelle Grattan.

Dividend imputation

Federal election 2019: RMIT ABC Fact Check runs the rule over Scott Morrison and Bill Shorten's second debate© AAP: Tracey Nearmy, file photo An elderly man watches the share market prices at the Australian Stock Exchange in Sydney on August 5, 2011. The issue of refunds for franking credits again emerged as a key point of difference between Labor and the Coalition.

During the second leaders' debate, Prime Minister Scott Morrison suggested Labor's controversial plan to raise more than $5 billion a year by ending refunds for excess franking credits was unfair to people on to modest incomes, particularly those in retirement.

In response, Opposition Leader Bill Shorten said the policy providing cash refunds for franking credits for people who paid no tax, introduced by the Howard government in 2001, represented an unsustainable "gift".

Fact Check has already looked into Coalition claims that the policy would hit some of the lowest-paid Australians.

We found such claims misleading, largely because they rely on the notion that people claiming franking cash refunds for excessive franking credits have low taxable incomes.

'He runs like Phoebe in Friends': Social media erupts after noticing Bill Shorten's VERY unique running style

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Scott Morrison . Bill Shorten . The 2019 Australian federal election was held on Saturday 18 May 2019 to elect members of the 46th Parliament of Australia. The result of the 2019 election was in stark contrast to the aggregation of opinion polls conducted over the period of the 45th parliament and

Fact Check . Other. News Home. analysisPolitics. After his federal election victory, the hard part begins for Morrison . Inside Scott Morrison 's Donald Voters are used to colourful characters and when matched against "the everyday bloke" Scott Morrison , Bill Shorten ' s persona didn't cut through.

Among other things, taxable income does not include the largest source of income for many retirees: superannuation.

Apprenticeships and traineeships

Federal election 2019: RMIT ABC Fact Check runs the rule over Scott Morrison and Bill Shorten's second debate© ABC supplied There has been an overall 45 per cent drop in apprenticeships and traineeships since 2013. Bill Shorten mentioned the decline in apprenticeships and traineeships, as he did in the first leaders' debate.

"We've seen the number of apprenticeships and traineeships drop radically under the current government," he said.

It's notable that Mr Shorten has subtly changed his language since Fact Check published its findings earlier this week on a related claim, which was deemed misleading.

That is because he used overall numbers for the decline in apprenticeships and traineeships while referring to a decline in apprenticeships only.

The two types of training programs are different: apprenticeships relate to traditional trades, while traineeships typically relate to the services sector.

In each of the debates, Mr Shorten correctly stated that apprenticeships and traineeships had both declined since the Coalition took office.

There has been an overall 45 per cent drop in apprenticeships and traineeships since 2013, driven mostly by a slump in traineeships (down 66 per cent) but also including a fall in apprenticeships (down 18 per cent).

'That's mean isn't it!' Bill Shorten laughs off claims he 'runs like Phoebe from Friends' in interview with Kyle and Jackie O

'That's mean isn't it!' Bill Shorten laughs off claims he 'runs like Phoebe from Friends' in interview with Kyle and Jackie O The Opposition Leader took time out of the campaign trail to sit down with Kyle and Jackie O on their KIIS breakfast radio show on Monday morning. 'That's mean isn't it!' Shorten joked when asked about his 'odd' running style.

Health

Bill Shorten again correctly claimed that GP out-of-pocket costs have risen 20 per cent under the Coalition, which is actually an understatement.

A recent Fact Check of a similar claim from Labor's Kristina Keneally found that GP costs had risen 28 per cent since Labor was last in government.

Carbon emissions

Federal election 2019: RMIT ABC Fact Check runs the rule over Scott Morrison and Bill Shorten's second debate© Walter/flickr.com/All Creative Commons Soaring power prices, the states' adoption of renewable energy and the closure of coal-fired power stations have played a part in Australia meeting its Kyoto 2020 target. Mr Morrison again claimed that the Coalition inherited — and turned around — a "700 million tonne" emissions deficit from Labor when it took office in 2013.

Fact Check examined the claim earlier in the year and deemed it to be "misleading".

The so-called "deficit" cited by Mr Morrison was taken from a 2012 forecast of the greenhouse gas reductions needed to hit Australia's 2020 target.

Shortly after the Coalition won the election, it became apparent that emissions under Labor's carbon tax had been lower than expected.

The department, for the first time, also factored in a significant "carryover" from the overachievement of the first Kyoto period.

Soaring power prices, the states' adoption of renewable energy and the closure of coal-fired power stations also played a part; Coalition policies have only played a relatively minor role.

On the other side of the divide, Bill Shorten's claim that carbon emissions are going up under the current government is broadly correct.

Federal election 2019: Scott Morrison defends preference deal with Clive Palmer's United Australia Party

Federal election 2019: Scott Morrison defends preference deal with Clive Palmer's United Australia Party The Prime Minister defends a preference deal with the Senate hopeful, saying the options on the ticket are "pretty thin" and arguing the Queensland minerals magnate is less of a risk to the Australian economy than Labor.

In December, Fact Check found emissions had been trending up since 2014, which coincided with the Abbott government's ditching of the carbon tax.

The latest data shows emissions continuing to rise, growing by 0.9 per cent in the year to September 2018, though Australia is still on track to meet its Kyoto 2020 target.

Part of Labor's plan to cut emissions is through the uptake of electric vehicles.

Electric vehicle sales make up just 0.2 per cent of new car sales — one of the lowest rates in the OECD — and Labor wants to increase that to 50 per cent by 2030.

Wage growth

Federal election 2019: RMIT ABC Fact Check runs the rule over Scott Morrison and Bill Shorten's second debate© Anne Zahalka, Parliament House Art Collection, Department of Parliamentary Services The minimum wage under the Coalition has grown at a faster rate than inflation and the average wage. Bill Shorten addressed the issue of wages when he suggested that, unlike corporate profits — which had increased by 39 per cent — wages had stagnated, having only gone up five to six per cent under this Government.

Fact Check has previously examined movements in real wages showing that they have indeed grown sluggishly over the past decade.

More recently, Fact Check looked into a claim made by Treasurer Josh Frydenberg that the minimum wage under the Coalition was growing at a faster rate than inflation and the average wage, whereas under Labor, the minimum wage went backwards.

We found the Treasurer’s claim was a fair call, with some caveats.

The real minimum wage rose during Labor's term as a whole, although it did fall by 2.3 per cent in 2009-10 following the onset of the global financial crisis.

Pictures: Politicians: Then and now

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