Australia: Vote for change: Shorten's closing pitch - PressFrom - Australia
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AustraliaVote for change: Shorten's closing pitch

11:07  16 may  2019
11:07  16 may  2019 Source:   msn.com

Bill Shorten’s pitch for PM

Bill Shorten’s pitch for PM The Opposition leader was warmly-received by the Q&A audience at Monash University in Melbourne on Monday night. Mr Shorten appeared well-informed and rarely stumbled despite being throw tough questions on a range of issues from tax cuts and Newstart to climate change. “Mr Shorten, you've been Opposition Leader through Abbott, Turnbull and Morrison, but you have consistently lagged behind these men in preferred PM polls.

Bill Shorten has sharpened his focus on wages and climate change , urging a " vote for change " in his final major campaign speech. A Labor government would convene parliament to put climate change action high on the agenda, expanding the Clean Energy Finance Corporation to drive 50 per cent

Bill Shorten has made his pitch for why he should be the country’ s next prime minister. He said: “The country needs change Mr Shorten finished his answer by declaring: “ Vote for Labor to end the chaos,” to rousing applause Mr Shorten closed the evening with a call for unity among all Australians.

Bill Shorten has sharpened his focus on wages and climate change, urging a "vote for change" in his final major campaign speech.

The Labor leader told a room full of supporters his first item of business in cabinet would be a new submission to the Fair Work Commission advocating a real wage increase for workers.

Restoring Sunday penalty rates and implementing income tax cuts would be his first legislative priorities.

A Labor government would convene parliament to put climate change action high on the agenda, expanding the Clean Energy Finance Corporation to drive 50 per cent renewable energy in the grid, Mr Shorten told party faithful in Blacktown on Thursday.

Bill Shorten more genuine in debate: body language expert

Bill Shorten more genuine in debate: body language expert Bill Shorten appeared more genuine, unscripted and prime ministerial in the final leaders’ debate last night than he had on previous occasions, according to a body language and speech expert. Mr Shorten had visibly teared up during a press conference earlier in the day, reacting to a Daily Telegraph story about his mother. And Michael Kelly, a body language expert, believes that emotional side to the Leader of the Opposition was carried into the debate. © AAP Bill Shorten and Scott Morrison during the third Leaders' Debate at the National Press Club in Canberra.

Vote for change : Shorten ' s closing pitch . This is Money 16 May 2019. Bill Shorten has sharpened his focus on wages and climate change , urging a " vote for change " in his final major campaign speech.

" Voting for any Democrat gets you all of that." Protesters burn American flag in Pioneer Courthouse Square on Jan. "Is that really what you want?" a woman' s voice asks. " Voting for any Democrat gets you all of that." The ad predictably fails to mention the long list of right-wing violence that has become

"I promise, we will send a message to the world, when it comes to climate change: Australia is back in the fight," he said.

"We will take this emergency seriously and we will not just leave it to other countries or to the next generation."

Not long after Prime Minister Scott Morrison was grilled at the National Press Club in Canberra, Mr Shorten was among a room of die-hard supporters cheering every other sentence.

He outlined Labor's expansive policy agenda headlined with the party's cancer package, childcare subsidies, funding for schools and hospitals and protections for the ABC and SBS.

"Vote for Change. Vote Labor," his refrain went.

Vote for change: Shorten's closing pitch © AAP Images Australian Opposition Leader Bill Shorten delivers a speech during the 'Vote for Change Rally' at Bowman Hall in Blacktown, Sydney, Thursday, May 16, 2019.

The speech was at Blacktown's Bowman Hall in Sydney's west, where Gough Whitlam delivered his It's Time address at the start of the 1972 election campaign.

'2022's looking good': Shorten king of the selfie-taking school kids

'2022's looking good': Shorten king of the selfie-taking school kids The kids went crazy for Bill Shorten in Gosford. It's a shame they can't vote.

App is designed to change the pitch of audio track without affecting the tempo. This easy-to-use tool work online directly from your browser. Change audio pitch without affecting the tempo. Choose audio file and adjust the pitch shifter.

The opposition leader is tapping into populist impulses while still positioning himself at the progressive centre. It’ s a bold strategy, but will it pay off?

While Mr Whitlam's speech started a tradition of kicking off with "men and women of Australia" - a phrase first used by Labor prime minister John Curtin - Mr Shorten started with "women and men".

He later said equality for women and opportunity in education would be championed by his deputy Tanya Plibersek.

In another nod to the Whitlam years, Little Pattie - one of the singers of the It's Time jingle - attended the speech.

Aside from Ms Plibersek, Mr Shorten was keen to talk up other members of his shadow ministry continuing his theme of comparing opposing frontbench line-ups.

He noted "father of reconciliation" Pat Dodson would be indigenous affairs minister, Chris Bowen would be treasurer and Penny Wong would be on the world stage as foreign minister.

"Tell people you're voting Labor because you want to see the most talented, experienced and passionate shadow ministry in a generation become a great Labor government," Mr Shorten said.

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Don't be shy about ALP agenda: Albanese.
Senior Labor figure Anthony Albanese has urged the party to hold the course on its "redistributive agenda" despite it losing the federal election. The man who Labor members wanted to lead the party six years ago has delivered another job application with his election night speech. Anthony Albanese won the popular vote to be opposition leader in 2013 but lost to Bill Shorten after caucus added its decision. Labor looks set to lose the federal election and Mr Shorten would be unlikely to hold on to the leadership. Mr Albanese said on Saturday night the whole Labor team hard worked incredibly hard during the campaign.

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