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AustraliaAustralian climber Gilian Lee recovering in Kathmandu after dramatic rescue high on Mount Everest

10:51  28 may  2019
10:51  28 may  2019 Source:   abc.net.au

Here's what it's like to live at Everest base camp

Here's what it's like to live at Everest base camp Here's what it's like to live at Everest base camp (Nat Geo) 1/13 SLIDES © Photograph by Dan Rafla, Aurora Polish climbers Leszek Cichy and Krzysztof Wielicki reached the top of Everest on February 17, 1980. Theirs was the first ascent of an 8,000-meter peak in winter, a remarkable achievement that was the brainchild of visionary expedition leader, Andrzej Zawada, and the beginning of Polish dominance in the world of high-altitude winter climbing.

The Australian climber recovering in a Kathmandu hospital after being rescued high up on the northern slopes of Mount Everest has been identified as Canberra man Gilian Lee.

Australian climber Gilian Lee recovering in Kathmandu after dramatic rescue high on Mount Everest© ABC Canberra man Gilian Lee is recovering in hospital in Kathmandu. Tibetan climbers found Mr Lee unconscious at an altitude of 7,500 metres last Wednesday.

The ABC understands Mr Lee was attempting to reach the summit without oxygen tanks.

It is unclear whether he fell ill on the way to the summit, or when coming back down the mountain.

The day before his rescue, Mr Lee complained on Twitter that he had a chest infection with a "killer sore throat".

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The ABC understands he is recovering in Kathmandu's Grande hospital.

Mr Lee arrived in Nepal to climb Mount Everest in April.

Stuck at Chinese Base Camp (CBC) ahead of his climb, Mr Lee took to social media to vent his frustrations as he waited for conditions to improve.

"Plans getting worse by the day. Lot of wind at the summit from the south side direction," he wrote on Facebook on May 9.

"[North] side windy as well. Chinese rope fixing team not at CBC so every day of delay is a nightmare."

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