Australia: Treaty's value questioned by Indigenous elders, but recognition of Australia's first people important - PressFrom - Australia
  •   
  •   

AustraliaTreaty's value questioned by Indigenous elders, but recognition of Australia's first people important

03:20  08 july  2019
03:20  08 july  2019 Source:   abc.net.au

Ancient Indigenous aquaculture site Budj Bim added to UNESCO World Heritage list

Ancient Indigenous aquaculture site Budj Bim added to UNESCO World Heritage list After more than a decade of hard work and lobbying, a south-west Victorian Indigenous site has been added to the UNESCO World Heritage List. (ABC News: Bridget Brennan) A south-west Victorian Indigenous site that is older than the pyramids has been added to t How To Get A Home Loan With 5% Deposit Find out more on Finder Ad Finder.com.au After more than a decade of hard work and lobbying, the Budj Bim Cultural Landscape near Portland was accepted onto the list at a meeting in Baku, Azerbaijan on the weekend.

Treaty . Truth. But the truth is that many Indigenous people feel voiceless when it comes to expressing where Australia stands on treaty today.

On 13 February 2008, the Parliament of Australia issued a formal apology to Indigenous Australians for forced removals of Australian indigenous children (often referred to as the Stolen Generations)

Treaty's value questioned by Indigenous elders, but recognition of Australia's first people important© ABC News Images This year's NAIDOC Week theme is Voice. Treaty. Truth. But the truth is that many Indigenous people feel voiceless when it comes to expressing where Australia stands on treaty today.

This year's NAIDOC Week theme is Voice. Treaty. Truth. But the truth is that many Indigenous people feel voiceless when it comes to expressing where Australia stands on treaty today.

The issue of a treaty has been on the agenda since 1988 when the Northern and Central Land Councils presented the late former prime minister Bob Hawke with the Barunga statement.

The statement asked the government to recognise the rights of Aboriginal Australians by introducing a treaty.

As a proud Torres Strait Islander I know a black and white future is possible

As a proud Torres Strait Islander I know a black and white future is possible I was sitting in the backyard, staring into the Queensland sun, when I saw the word "sorry" written in the sky. It was the first time I realised that being Indigenous could be a problem, writes Isabella Higgins. Many of us know that acceptance, inclusion and respect between black and white Australia is possible, because we're the walking, breathing proof. Take my family for example. We're proud Torres Strait Islanders, but we also have German and British ancestry. We are an embodiment of multicultural Australia. My great-grandmother came to this country as a WWII refugee, raised in Nazi Germany.

Indigenous peoples are inheritors and practitioners of unique cultures and ways of relating to people and the environment. To protest the breaking of the Treaty of Waitangi concluded with the Maori in New Zealand in 1840 that gave Maori ownership of their lands, Ratana first traveled to London with a

COMMENT | Negotiating a treaty with Australia ' s First Peoples is not only an important step towards Aboriginal people though have made it clear that recognition and treaty must be things of Tony McAvoy: The time to push for a treaty is right now. Australia ' s first Indigenous Senior

At that point a policy was adopted to support a treaty between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and the Australian Government, but so far no treaty has eventuated.

With more than 500 nations across the country, Indigenous Australians have a long and rich history of intertribal treaties.

Minister to reveal 'indigenous voice' plan

Minister to reveal 'indigenous voice' plan Indigenous Australians Minister Ken Wyatt will make his first major speech at Canberra's Press Club since becoming the first Aboriginal person to hold the role. Indigenous Australians Minister Ken Wyatt is set to shed light on his plan for potentially achieving constitutional recognition of Australia's first peoples. How To Get A Home Loan With 5% Deposit Find out more on Finder Ad Finder.com.au Mr Wyatt will also highlight the Morrison government's commitment to an indigenous voice to parliament in a major speech at Canberra's National Press Club on Wednesday.

Indigenous rights are those rights that exist in recognition of the specific condition of the indigenous peoples . This includes not only the most basic human rights of physical survival and integrity

Calls for a treaty in Australia refer to a formal agreement between the government and Indigenous people that would have legal outcomes. Why is a treaty important ? A treaty could provide, among other things: a symbolic recognition of Indigenous sovereignty and prior occupation of this land.

Intertribal treaties facilitated both respect between clans, and protocols to adhere to when establishing who had authority over that particular country.

Treaty's value questioned by Indigenous elders, but recognition of Australia's first people important© ABC News Images This year's NAIDOC Week theme is Voice. Treaty. Truth. But the truth is that many Indigenous people feel voiceless when it comes to expressing where Australia stands on treaty today.

The view that a national treaty is well overdue is held by many across Australia but some New South Wales south coast residents believe a treaty won't change anything.

What they want is to be recognised as Australia's first nations people.

Indigenous artist and teacher of Indigenous cultural arts Warwick Keen said Aboriginal people "always had respect for other people's land when they crossed over into someone's territory".

"Ensuring that the protocols were adhered to entitled them to do that. That was intertribal treaty," Mr Keen said.

How likely the Indigenous Constitutional referendum is to pass

How likely the Indigenous Constitutional referendum is to pass If history is anything to go by Ken Wyatt has a one in 20 chance of achieving constitutional recognition for indigenous Australians through a referendum. If history is anything to go by Ken Wyatt has a one in 20 chance of achieving constitutional recognition for indigenous Aus The first Aboriginal appointed as Indigenous Australians Minister plans to hold a national vote within three years. Once Mr Wyatt introduces the bill to enable a referendum, it needs to be passed by both houses and must be put to the public within six months.

Tony McAvoy SC, Australia ’ s first Indigenous senior counsel barrister, told Radio National constitutional recognition could lead into a treaty . “The optimum model I think would be constitutional recognition which provided for an agreement-making process,” he said. “What needs to happen is

Many important Indigenous Peoples ' rights are not framed in specific Indigenous Peoples ' rights treaties , but are part of more general treaties , like the Universal Declaration of Human Rights or the Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide. United Nations.

"From 1777 onwards there was none of that."

Mr Keen, who has been living in the Shoalhaven region for 11 years, identifies as a Gomeroi man whose first language is Gamilaraay.

Treaty's value questioned by Indigenous elders, but recognition of Australia's first people important© ABC News Images This year's NAIDOC Week theme is Voice. Treaty. Truth. But the truth is that many Indigenous people feel voiceless when it comes to expressing where Australia stands on treaty today.

He said that for most of his life, he was a "perfect example" of how to assimilate, becoming the person that the government policies demanded of him by the age of 10.

"I lived my life in accordance with that because I believed in what the government was saying. I believed my schoolteachers, police, magistrates and government officials," Mr Keen said.

Now in his 60s, Mr Keen recognises Indigenous ways of viewing the world and has mixed feelings about how the nation's first people would benefit from a treaty.

He stresses that his opinions are his own and says in general he isn't interested in politics. Instead he chooses to express himself through his artwork.

"As far as treaty goes I guess it would build up acknowledgement and recognition but if people are going to talk about doing these things there's got to be sincerity otherwise it is just pie-in-the-sky really," he said.

Treaty when? Dodson warns of betrayal and airbrushing of Indigenous ambition

Treaty when? Dodson warns of betrayal and airbrushing of Indigenous ambition A soft reconciliation that lets "white folks" feel they're taking action is not enough, writes the shadow assistant minister for constitutional recognition.

There are several hundred Indigenous peoples of Australia ; many are groupings that existed before the British colonisation of Australia in 1788.

A majority of Aboriginal people would prefer a treaty with the Australian government rather than constitutional Nova Peris supports Indigenous plebiscite on constitutional recognition . Read more. Sansbury, who was born and raised on an Aboriginal reserve on South Australia ’ s Yorke

Sharing stories so we can all look after country Like most clan groups from across the country, the Yuin nation's Budawang people respect the dreamtime stories of significant landmarks in their region.

Balgan, re-named by Captain James Cook as Pigeon House Mountain, has long been used as a visual tool to maintain lore (law) and order between tribes maintaining treaties.

"We can see that mountain anywhere while we are in country," said Yuin elder and historian Noel Butler.

"If we can't see that mountain well, we're out of country and we are probably in trouble because we have to ask permission to go to somebody else's country like the Dharawal mob," he said.

It's a sentiment that resonates up and down the coastline as dreamtime stories taught Indigenous Australians how to treat each other equally using geographical features, which provide rules on how to live well with people from their own country, and neighbouring tribes with whom they have treaties.

Black history was a hidden history Dharawal elder Lorraine Brown, an artist at Coomaditichie United Aboriginal Corporation in Port Kembla, believes a treaty won't change anything.

"To me a treaty would not make any difference. The only acknowledgement that people need to realise is that we were the first people here," she said.

Most voters support indigenous recognition

Most voters support indigenous recognition A majority of Australians support recognising indigenous people in the constitution and establishing a voice to parliament, an Essential survey has confirmed. A clear majority of voters support recognising indigenous Australians in the constitution and creating a voice to parliament, according to a new poll. Most also support a treaty with indigenous Australians, the Essential survey confirms. require(["inlineoutstreamAd", "c.

Mansell told Guardian Australia . “With a treaty you would get a land settlement, a sharing of power through allocated seats, and presumably a permanent “Do you agree with a treaty with Aboriginal peoples as first nations peoples of Australia ? “ Treaty could be the thing that strengthens people

The proposed treaty commission would be given the dual task of working towards a treaty and engaging in a public truth-telling process. The central plank is the proposed parliamentary voice for Indigenous peoples , a suggestion championed by Cape York leader Noel Pearson.

"The American Indians, the Canadian Indians, the Maoris, they all signed treaties but it never really changed much."

Ms Brown thinks a treaty is way overdue and doesn't claim to know what others in her community think, but suggests that fighting for change is what Aboriginal people do.

"Whether we have a treaty of not it won't make any difference to me. As a black person, an Aboriginal woman, I feel very strong about that," she said.

"There's a lot of people in the country who know our people were the first people here and acknowledge that, but there are still people who think Captain Cook landed here first, before us.

"As people come in, new generations of people, new cultures of people, it's something that must be known, acknowledged: that we were the first people of this country.

"To me that's an acknowledgement that all people must know because don't forget our black history was a hidden history."

Ms Brown said people needed to understand the history to understand the struggle.

In a statement, Minister for Indigenous Australians Ken Wyatt said the Government was committed to recognising Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in the constitution:

The Government is monitoring the work the states and territories are doing on treaties; however, the priority for the Government is the recognition of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in the constitution.

Refugees on Manus to receive Australian First Nations 'passports' from activists aboard sail boat.
Letters of solidarity and more than 400 Aboriginal 'passports' will be delivered to Manus Island refugees as a group of boats set sail for Papua New Guinea.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

usr: 2
This is interesting!