Australia: Darwin woman breaks down telling aged care royal commission of father's treatment - PressFrom - Australia
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AustraliaDarwin woman breaks down telling aged care royal commission of father's treatment

12:22  12 july  2019
12:22  12 july  2019 Source:   abc.net.au

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Day three of the Royal Commission into Aged Care Quality and Safety in Darwin was told eight maggots were found in a serious pressure wound A detailed report from the commission released in May found the infection was one of seven causes of her death. Ms Ng broke down in court today at

A woman has told how maggots were found in a wound in her mother’ s heel shortly before her death which had been left untreated for months in a Melbourne aged care home. Anamaria Ng wept while telling the Royal Commission into Aged Care about how horrified she was about had happened to

Darwin woman breaks down telling aged care royal commission of father's treatment© Provided by Australian Broadcasting Corporation Jo-Ann Lovegrove says her father's health has taken a turn for the worse since he was admitted. (Supplied: Royal Commission into Aged Care Quality and Safety)

Jo-Ann Lovegrove's father just wanted to find a place where he could smoke and keep his dog.

Instead, the 79-year-old dementia patient's indefinite stay in a Darwin aged care centre has allegedly been marked by unchecked injuries, aggravation and oversedation.

After three days of hearing horror aged care stories from Victoria, New South Wales and Queensland, the Royal Commission into Aged Care Quality and Safety today turned the spotlight back to the Northern Territory.

Aged care advocates say fear of reprisals keeping stories hidden

Aged care advocates say fear of reprisals keeping stories hidden Prominent NT disability services advocate Robyne Burridge says people with loved ones in aged care are afraid to speak out about poor conditions because there may not be anywhere else to take them. "They're obviously very, very understaffed. For the owners of this nursing home, it is all about money," she said. The not-for-profit organisation which owns Pearl, Southern Cross Care, didn't respond directly to Mrs Burridge's allegations, but told the ABC they had "high staffing levels at Pearl Supported Care … we also have registered nurses on every shift.

Day four of the Royal Commission into Aged Care Quality and Safety in Darwin saw a daughter make a desperate plea for other relatives of nursing home residents to install surveillance cameras in their loved ones’ rooms after learning her mother was allegedly hit on multiple occasions.

The royal commission into Australia' s aged care system will take its first evidence in Adelaide today. Oakden Whistle Blower, Barbara Spriggs and her son Clive, fought back tears as they told the At the Oakden Aged care facility north east of Adelaide, Bob Spriggs, Barbara' s husband and

During a tearful account of her father's treatment, Ms Lovegrove said her father's health had deteriorated rapidly in just over six months since he was referred to the centre.

"Dad has dramatically declined and it breaks my heart to see this once fit, active, kind gentleman left in his bed or princess chair, confused, lonely and fading fast," Ms Lovegrove said.

"I want to see my dad cared for and looked after by staff of the Darwin facility the way he should be."

She alleged the Darwin facility — which she did not name — had put her father on heavy sedatives without first alerting her.

"It is concerning that the doctor does not seek my authorisation," she said.

"… I am disturbed by the amount of time he now spends in bed, I can't help but feel this [medicating] suits the staff of the Darwin facility more than it suits my dad."

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Aged care workers feared they would 'get in trouble' after maggots found in woman's foot in nursing home An elderly Italian migrant had a festering, blackened wound on her heel that had been left without treatment for so long it became infested with maggots, and eventually contributed to her death, a royal commission hears. WARNING: This story features graphic images.

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In her evidence, Ms Lovegrove spoke of visiting her father one day, and finding him "covered in bandages all over his body and dried blood on his face".

On another day she said she found him soaked in his own urine.

"I am concerned as to the length of time it takes staff members to care for my dad after these incidents," Ms Lovegrove said.

Testimony wraps in Darwin, heads to Cairns

The testimony wrapped up five days of commission hearings in Darwin.

It also ended a week of scandal for the sector, which included stories of maggots being found in an elderly woman's wound in a Melbourne aged care centre to the sudden, dramatic closure of one on the Gold Coast.

Earlier in the week there was a day of evidence given relating to the lack of resources allocated to the remote Northern Territory.

The commission juggernaut now heads to Cairns, in Far North Queensland, where it will hear from witnesses affected, along with experts from across the health sphere.

Among those taking to the stand will be aged care facility NewDirection, the Dieticians Association of Australia and celebrated chef and restauranteur Maggie Beer.

Surgeries put on hold, double shifts for staff as Darwin hospital overflows.
For the third time in the past week, Beau Griffin's knee surgery has been cancelled. Patients and hospital workers are caught in the crunch of a hospital system which is overcrowded because of a lack of community care.

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