Australia: Paralysed five-year-old boy facing deportation over the cost of his medical treatment - - PressFrom - Australia
  •   
  •   

Australia Paralysed five-year-old boy facing deportation over the cost of his medical treatment

02:35  11 october  2019
02:35  11 october  2019 Source:   abc.net.au

Brain-controlled exoskeleton helps paralysed man learn to walk again in technological breakthrough

  Brain-controlled exoskeleton helps paralysed man learn to walk again in technological breakthrough A French man paralysed in a night club accident can walk again thanks to a brain-controlled exoskeleton, in what scientists say is a breakthrough providing hope to tetraplegics seeking to regain movement. © AFP: Clinatec Endowment Fund Thibault severed his spinal cord four years ago on a night out when he fell 12 metres from a balcony. The patient trained for months, harnessing his brain signals to control a computer-simulated avatar to perform basic movements before using the robot device to walk.

When The Cost Of Care Triggers A Medical Deportation . Several years ago I began caring for a man who'd been in our hospital for more than three months. His immigration status meant that we couldn't find an outside charity that would cover the costs of his care or pay for insurance.

The boy was born two months after his mother came to Ireland in 2009. After a deportation order was made in 2011, she evaded it and later took three legal challenges. On Monday, a five -judge Supreme Court reserved judgment on the child’s appeal over the High Court refusals. No criminal record.

a little girl lying on a bed: Five-year-old Shaffan Mohammad Ghulam was born in Perth with a rare genetic condition. (ABC News: Hugh Sando)© Provided by Australian Broadcasting Corporation Five-year-old Shaffan Mohammad Ghulam was born in Perth with a rare genetic condition. (ABC News: Hugh Sando)

The parents of a little boy who suffers from a rare genetic condition say his life would be at risk if he is deported from Australia, after his application for permanent residency was rejected over the cost of his ongoing care.

Shaffan Muhammad Ghulam has a rare genetic disorder called chondrodysplasia punctata that affects the development of his bones.

He suffered a partial break on his spine when he was six months old, leaving him paralysed.

Brain-controlled exoskeleton helps paralysed man learn to walk again in technological breakthrough

  Brain-controlled exoskeleton helps paralysed man learn to walk again in technological breakthrough A French man paralysed in a night club accident can walk again thanks to a brain-controlled exoskeleton, in what scientists say is a breakthrough providing hope to tetraplegics seeking to regain movement. The patient trained for months, harnessing his brain signals to control a computer-simulated avatar to perform basic movements before using the robot device to walk.Doctors who conducted the trial cautioned the device was years away from being publicly available but stressed it had "the potential to improve patients' quality of life and autonomy".

5 year - old - boy with a brain tumor the best chance to live with a revolutionary new treatment they Of 5 - Year - Old Boy With Brain Tumor Fight Extradition Amid Dispute Over His Medical Treatment . King, 5, has a brain tumour and was taken by his parents from a hospital without the consent of his

THIS two- year - old Nepalese boy has a third arm growing out of his back, a deformity which has left his parents with a heart-wrenching Now Kalpena and husband Ashish face the impossible decision of whether or not to have the fifth limb removed – knowing that it could leave Gaurab paralysed .

He is getting better at breathing on his own, but he still relies on a ventilator and needs round-the-clock medical care.

Now he is facing deportation to his parent's home country of Pakistan, but his family say they have medical advice that he is at significant risk of respiratory decompensation in the low-pressure environment of an airplane, which could kill him.

Shaffan was born in Australia in 2014, five years after his father came here to study.

His father, Qasim Butt, completed his masters in accountancy and remained in Australia on a graduate visa that allowed him to work.

When that ran out in 2016, he and his wife applied for permanent residency for themselves, Shaffan, and their two-year-old daughter.

But after completing a medical assessment they were told they were not eligible because their son's ongoing medical care needs would "likely result in a significant cost to the Australian community".

Paralysed man walks using mind-controlled robotic suit

  Paralysed man walks using mind-controlled robotic suit A man paralysed from the shoulders down has been able to walk using a pioneering four-limb robotic suit, or exoskeleton, that is commanded by signals from his brain. The 28-year-old quadriplegic patient, known only as Thibault, used a system of sensors implanted near his brain to send messages to move all four of his paralysed limbs of the exoskeleton which was attached to a ceiling harness to help him balance.

Over the last year , his condition has deteriorated with routine violent seizures, each characterized by a fall He spends most of his days inside a one-room house; only the presence of visitors, who can help him Hospitals are mandated to treat and stabilize anyone suffering from an emergency medical

Half his body was paralyzed and he couldn't swallow food. After weeks of intensive physical His immigration status meant that we couldn't find an outside charity that would cover the costs of his care or pay Nevertheless, our hospital faced a real financial burden, and the case manager pressed on.

"That is very devastating we are rejected on the basis of the cost," Mr Butt said.

"We understand that whatever decision we got, that is according to the law, which is acceptable, but [at] the same time I think that is not fair, that the department is not considering his current situation."

The family say while the community in Perth have rallied around them, they have been placed under enormous pressure after their appeal of the department's decision was rejected.

"They understand us, they understand my son's condition and I am sure that they consider that as a human being Shaffan's life is more important than a medical expense," he said.

Mr Butt said Shaffan will not receive the help he needs in Pakistan.

"We all know that the health care system that Shaffan is getting in Australia is the best," he said.

"Shaffan is five years old and he is improving.

"We are so happy that Shaffan is in good hands, so I think [the] Minister needs to consider on compassionate grounds, this it the last chance for us.

"This is the last hope for Shaffan as well.

"We don't want to be putting our child at risk."

Appeals of deportation decisions in Australia are reviewed by the Administrative Appeals Tribunal.

Under the Migration Act, if an appeal is not successful an individual can ask the Minister to personally intervene on their behalf, and prevent their deportation.

The Butt family have submitted a formal application to the Minister on compassionate grounds.

A spokeswoman for the Department of Home Affairs said they could not comment on individual cases.

But she said individuals could apply for ministerial intervention and could stay in the country until their case was reviewed.

Peter Dutton calls medevac laws a 'con' .
Home Affairs Minister Peter Dutton is pushing to repeal the medevac laws, which have allowed more than 130 asylum seekers and refugees to come to Australia for medical treatment since February, arguing the legislation was a “con from day one”. “I hope that we can abolish this bad law,” Mr Dutton told Sky News host Paul Murray. Mr Dutton used his power under medevac laws, on Wednesday, to block a father from accompanying his 21-year-old daughter to Australia for her medical treatment, citing the man’s history of violence.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

usr: 7
This is interesting!