Australia: How a distraught farmer whose story Alan Jones labelled as everything wrong with the government's drought response is now BACKING the PM - after a heartfelt call - - PressFrom - Australia
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Australia How a distraught farmer whose story Alan Jones labelled as everything wrong with the government's drought response is now BACKING the PM - after a heartfelt call

11:15  16 october  2019
11:15  16 october  2019 Source:   dailymail.co.uk

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How a distraught farmer whose story Alan Jones labelled as everything wrong with the government ' s drought response is now BACKING the PM - after a heartfelt call . Mark Hollman, from Bourke in north New South Wales, appealed to PM for help. Broadcaster Alan Jones described

A distraught farmer who received a phone call from Scott Morrison told the Prime Minister to 'p*** off' as he could not believe it was a genuine call . Mark Hollman, from Bourke in northern New South Wales, appeared on Alan Jones ' 2GB radio show last week and begged the PM to help struggling farmers .

Video provided by Sky News Australia

A distraught caller whose story broadcaster Alan Jones hailed as a 'metaphor' for government inaction on the drought has praised Prime Minister Scott Morrison for giving farmers hope.

Last week father-of-four Mark Hollman, from Bourke in north-western New South Wales, was distressed at what he then believed was the federal government's failed response to the drought.

He broke down in tears as he told a supportive Jones of the devastating impact of drought on his family and how he had 'no hope' of help from the government.

No magic wand on drought, Morrison argues

  No magic wand on drought, Morrison argues Prime Minister Scott Morrison has argued there is no magic wand or cash splash that can solve the ongoing drought, but insists he is doing all he can to help.Scott Morrison has defended his government's response to the ongoing drought, after hearing the desperate pleas of an outback community member in distress.

Alan Jones furiously rowed with Scott Morrison about drought relief for farmers in an explosive interview on Tuesday morning, sparking loyal voters to turn on the PM . In one particularly heated moment, the radio host interrupted Mr Morrison and bluntly told him: 'Oh don't talk to me, I'm a

Alan Jones appeared on Sky News on Tuesday where he discussed how he has been overrun with calls from Alan Jones broke down on live TV as he fights for drought -stricken farmers . It comes after his row with At one point he bluntly said to the PM : 'Oh don't talk to me, I'm a farmer ' s son'.

a man wearing a hat and glasses: Mark Hollman's story was hailed by 2GB's Alan Jones as a 'metaphor' for the drought© Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited Mark Hollman's story was hailed by 2GB's Alan Jones as a 'metaphor' for the drought Jones, who has been attacking Mr Morrison on air daily, told Mr Hollman the 'emotion you demonstrated and the passion with which you spoke is emblematic of every farmer across this country.'

But on Monday morning Mr Morrison called Mark Hollman and told him during a 35-minute conversation exactly what the government was doing for farmers and farming communities.

Mr Hollman, who was once a citrus farmer but now manages Bourke's swimming pool, had some hope for the future and could sleep better at night.

Alan Jones wearing a suit and tie talking on a cell phone: A distraught caller whose story broadcaster Alan Jones (pictured) hailed as a 'metaphor' for government inaction on the drought has praised Prime Minister Scott Morrison for giving farmers hope© Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited A distraught caller whose story broadcaster Alan Jones (pictured) hailed as a 'metaphor' for government inaction on the drought has praised Prime Minister Scott Morrison for giving farmers hope 'To be honest, the prime minister was very supportive,' Mr Hollman told Channel 9 after the conversation with Mr Morrison.

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A drought stricken farmer has revealed what he told Prime Minister Scott Morrison when he called following his emotional radio interview with Alan Jones . A farmer who broke down in tears while talking about the drought has revealed what he told the Prime Minister during a “frank” phone call .

Alan Jones is known for taking no prisoners when it comes to his radio interviews and Scott Morrison has become the latest person to be taken to task by the shock jock as the broadcaster blasted the government ’ s drought efforts as the pair chatted over the phone this morning.

'He explained his situation. He reassured me about what he's got planned and what's coming up. It surprised me and I took it on board.'

'I honestly believe the prime minister understands now. I honestly believe that he understands how dire it is here and I just hope that his other ministers also realise that.

Scott Morrison in a business suit sitting at a desk: Alan Jones, who has been attacking Mr Morrison (pictured) on air daily, told Mark Hollman the 'emotion you demonstrated and the passion with which you spoke is emblematic of every farmer across this country'© Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited Alan Jones, who has been attacking Mr Morrison (pictured) on air daily, told Mark Hollman the 'emotion you demonstrated and the passion with which you spoke is emblematic of every farmer across this country'

'If you ask me did I sleep better and did he give me a bit of hope, the answer is yes, he did.

'We're a long way from it but there was a little bit of hope after that conversation.'

Jones has repeatedly told his 2GB audience the government was not listening to farmers but Mr Hollman was impressed by getting a phone call from Mr Morrison.

Battling farmer reveals contents of PM's call

  Battling farmer reveals contents of PM's call The farmer who was phoned by Prime Minister Scott Morrison after his emotional radio outburst has revealed the contents of their call. Mark Hollman, from Bourke, told 2GB's Alan Jones: "We're dying out here" as he demanded more government action to help people struggling in the drought.His raw emotions prompted Mr Morrison to pick up the phone, and as Mr Hollman tells 9NewsWatch's Sylvia Jeffreys their conversation has given him "a little hope".Mr Hollman ran a citrus farm until it went bust during a drought in the early 2000s. He raised all four of his children in the NSW outback.

Jones grew increasingly agitated as he grilled Scott Morrison on the government ' s drought relief policies. Why, if the drought response is adequate, would a farmer write to me and say this Why bother? I guarantee Australia will have no more confidence in the Morrison government after your

When Morrison called the radio show, Jones grilled him on the government ' s immediate plans for Where things stand politically today is this: drought and the farmer are now a massive political Jones read out a letter from 28-year-old woman named Mary, also from Bourke, who said she had

a little boy standing on a dry grass field: OI Monday morning Mr Morrison called Mark Hollman and told him what the government was doing for farmers and farming communities. Pictured is crop farmer Neil Westcott near Parkes© Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited OI Monday morning Mr Morrison called Mark Hollman and told him what the government was doing for farmers and farming communities. Pictured is crop farmer Neil Westcott near Parkes 'Isn't it a positive note that we live in a country like Australia and the prime minister rings up a boy from Bourke? How great of a country can it be?'

Mr Morrison told Jones about his conversation with Mr Hollman after a heated discussion with the broadcaster on Tuesday morning.

'What I did yesterday is I took him through all the things that I just talked to you about, and he wasn't aware of those things,' Mr Morrison said.

Sylvia Jeffreys wearing a hat and glasses: Mark Hollman, from Bourke in north western New South Wales, was interviewed by Channel 9's Sylvia Jeffreys (both pictured). Mr Hollman was happy with his phone call from Scott Morrison© Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited Mark Hollman, from Bourke in north western New South Wales, was interviewed by Channel 9's Sylvia Jeffreys (both pictured). Mr Hollman was happy with his phone call from Scott Morrison 'I spoke to him at some length. I took him through all the things we were doing.

'At the end of the conversation, Alan, this is what he said to me. He said, "This is the hope I was looking for Scott." That's what Mark said to me yesterday.'

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Australian farmer has broken down in tears over effects of drought on his town. The father-of-four, Mark, called on the government to build their town a dam. In a raw outpouring of desperation on Alan Jones ' 2GB radio show, the farmer called Mark begged Prime Minister Scott Morrison to lift his

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Mr Hollman had joined in Jones's criticism of Mr Morrison when he called in last week to detail the devastating effect of the drought on his family.

'At the last election I voted for Morrison because I thought he was our hope,' Mr Hollman had said.

'We're a real tough mob. We have put up with drought and dust storms but we always have hope.

'But now we have got none - give us some bloody hope Scott! Tell us you are going to build a dam, tell us you're going to put a shovel in the bloody ground!

'We're dying out here. My town is dying.'

He said of Mr Morrison: 'You've got him on next week. Ask him. Tell him Mark in Bourke wants to know where his hope is.'

a close up of a desert field: Last year, the period 2019-2021 was predicted to be very likely the driest in Australia for more than 200 years. Pictured is drought-ravaged land near Guyra, north-eastern New South Wales© Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited Last year, the period 2019-2021 was predicted to be very likely the driest in Australia for more than 200 years. Pictured is drought-ravaged land near Guyra, north-eastern New South Wales

Jones said after the call that 'Mark has become a metaphor' for the drought.

'Mark, you've made a massive contribution to the cause because the emotion you demonstrated and the passion with which you spoke is emblematic of every farmer across this country.

'This is beyond desperate because the next step after desperate is death.'

The federal government has been frustrated by Jones's attacks on its response to the drought, which Coalition MPs say has been largely welcomed by affected communities.

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Alan Jones has broken down live on Sky News while talking about drought -stricken farmers and criticising He spoke about a call from a farmer just 10 minutes after his interview with Mr Morrison, in which And then he delivered a stark warning for the PM . “The Morrison Government tonight has a

‘What’ s wrong with this key?’ he asked Sharon. ‘It ( NOT SEEM ) to be working.’ Confused, Sharon stepped back and took a good look at the car. They HAD PARKED their car in the car park and were now returning to it with their shopping bags. Paul put the car key into the door, but it wouldn’t turn.

Mr Morrison has been provided with a list of frustrated farmers who have contacted Jones's program and plans to call them to explain what his government is doing to help those devastated by drought.

Bourke is in a state of intense drought and Mr Hollman wept last week as he told of how three of his children had already left home because the situation was so bleak.

The former farmer recalled a conversation with his son, pleading for him to come home to see his parents.

'I say to my son, "When are you going to come home to see me and Mum mate?" He says, "Why, there's nothing out there".

'I want my kids to come home Alan.

In May this year, 98.6 per cent of New South Wales and 65.2 per cent of Queensland was declared to be in a state of drought.

a sandy beach next to a body of water: Pictured: Drought affected land in Stanthorpe on Queensland's southern border© Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited Pictured: Drought affected land in Stanthorpe on Queensland's southern border

'Don't talk to me - I'm a farmer's son, you're not': Scott Morrison's most loyal voters turn on him after 'diabolical' interview with Alan Jones over Australia's drought crisis

Alan Jones furiously rowed with Scott Morrison about drought relief for farmers in an explosive interview on Tuesday morning, sparking loyal voters to turn on the PM.

In one particularly heated moment, the radio host interrupted Mr Morrison and bluntly told him: 'Oh don't talk to me, I'm a farmer's son and you're not.'

After the interview Jones was overrun with calls from listeners, many of whom voted Liberal, as they lined up to slam the Prime Minster, calling him 'arrogant' and a 'waste of space'.

Trucker to drive water to drought-stricken communities

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Jones back then seemed to be a genuine alternative to the mainstream media. By all accounts both sides of the government were counterfeit according to Jones , whoever was in charge For Jones to be so staunchly against the New World Order how can he then back potential members of the group?

Keep persisting, go ahead.”― Alan Maiccon. Those who stick with it, build a legacy without regrets.”― Trevor Carss. 73.) “A difficult life spent in hard-work, perseverance, and So it has been with the best people who ever lived.”― Jeffrey R. Holland. 75.) “Don’t be ashamed by your mistakes

A fired-up Jones was urging the PM to do more to help farmers who cannot afford feed and water to keep livestock alive.

Scott Morrison, Michael McCormack are posing for a picture: Alan Jones furiously rowed with Scott Morrison (pictured) about drought relief for farmers in an explosive interview on Tuesday morning, sparking loyal voters to turn on the PM© Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited Alan Jones furiously rowed with Scott Morrison (pictured) about drought relief for farmers in an explosive interview on Tuesday morning, sparking loyal voters to turn on the PM

'These people, Prime Minister, cannot survive today,' Jones said angrily.

'They are sending the breeding stock to the sale yard to be slaughtered, they're walking off their farms.

'They need cash now. Now. Just as we gave a billion dollars to Indonesia over a tsunami. This is a drought tsunami.'

Mr Morrison explained that he couldn't make it rain and that $318million has already helped in the past year.

"How does that feed a cow? "
Jones repeatedly asked the PM

'The direct cash grant support is going into farming communities, including directly to farmers,' Mr Morrison said.

But Jones interrupted, saying: 'They're not getting it!'

Mr Morrison continued: 'Alan, if you could let me finish. There's $318.5 million...'

'I don't know where the money is Prime Minister,' Jones interjected.

As Mr Morrison tried to make his point, Jones cut in with a blunt remark: 'Oh don't talk to me, I'm a farmer's son and you're not.'

In May 2019, 98.6 per cent of New South Wales and 65.2 per cent of Queensland was declared to be in a state of drought. Pictured is a property on the outskirts of Boggabri, NSW© Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited In May 2019, 98.6 per cent of New South Wales and 65.2 per cent of Queensland was declared to be in a state of drought. Pictured is a property on the outskirts of Boggabri, NSW

Mr Morrison continued trying to explain how aid has helped while a frustrated Jones kept interjecting and asking: 'How does that feed a cow?'

Jones then criticised the Farm Household Allowance scheme, which gives farmers fortnightly payments and, in some cases, lump sum payments of up to $12,000.

'You say Farm Household Allowance. Now PM, come on. You go and tell Jenny that she can live on $250 a week,' Jones said.

Albanese urges PM to form drought cabinet

  Albanese urges PM to form drought cabinet Labor Leader Anthony Albanese is urging the prime minister to form a joint drought cabinet.The proposed "war cabinet" would be chaired by the prime minister, and co-chaired by Mr Albanese and Nationals Leader Michael McCormack, and bring together relevant ministers and opposition MPs from areas affected by the drought.

But next time is now , and despite everything our rural communities have overcome and learnt, it When things get grim for us graziers with the drought , the costs go up and we are all after it.” Mr Turnbull was pictured hugging a distraught farmer in regional NSW earlier today after he announced

'It's not $250 a week Alan. It's not just that,' Mr Morrison replied.

a close up of Alan Jones: Jones (pictured) angrily interrupted the PM several times during an interview on Tuesday© Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited Jones (pictured) angrily interrupted the PM several times during an interview on Tuesday

'If you live in the city, and your business goes bust or you lose your job, then you have access to Newstart. But if you are on a farm property and you get access to the Farm Household Allowance.'

Jones did not accept his answer and pressed the PM further by asking: 'Why are they walking off? Why are they sending their cattle to slaughter?'

'Because of the drought, that's why,' said the PM.

Mr Morrison then admitted he couldn't save farmers from some hardship.

'The government, whether it's state, federal or anyone else, we can do a lot of things to try and help people get through this. But the government can't make it rain, and it can't make life as it was before the drought,' he said.

'We both want the same thing. We want the farmers to be able to get through this drought. But we can't kid ourselves that there's a magic wand and a magic cash splash that's going to make this thing totally solved.'

At times during the interview, Jones became exasperated as he repeatedly interrupted the Prime Minister and sighed and tutted when Mr Morrison spoke.

Despite Jones' combative stance, 2GB listeners said they were disappointed by the Prime Minister.

One named Robert said: 'My blood's boiling after hearing that. Complete failure as a Prime Minister. He's arrogant. They've been conning the public after the election.'

Another named Michelle added: 'I'm a dairy farmer's daughter. That interview should sign the end of his Prime Ministership. Just absolutely diabolical.'

One listener named Chris said: 'Today we've nailed him to a post. He's a failure.'

Some of the 2GB listeners said they had voted for Mr Morrison in the election in May, bringing him victory against the odds for which he credited 'quiet Australians'.

He was referring to rural, regional and older Australians who go about their business without making a fuss or sharing their opinions before polling day.

Read more

Albanese urges PM to form drought cabinet .
Labor Leader Anthony Albanese is urging the prime minister to form a joint drought cabinet.The proposed "war cabinet" would be chaired by the prime minister, and co-chaired by Mr Albanese and Nationals Leader Michael McCormack, and bring together relevant ministers and opposition MPs from areas affected by the drought.

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