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Australia Prosecutions 'should' and 'will' occur following ABC report: Racing Australia CEO

01:32  18 october  2019
01:32  18 october  2019 Source:   brisbanetimes.com.au

Supercars team confirms switch for 2020

  Supercars team confirms switch for 2020 Kelly Racing announces the end of its seven year association with Nissan and reveals its plans for the 2020 season.The Melbourne based operation will also scale back its commitment to two cars, having run four cars with Nissan.

The ABC says Racing Australia 's official data claims around 34 horses every year end up at slaughterhouses, a figure amounting to less than one per cent of retiring racehorses. However, the national broadcaster says a two-year investigation, culminating in a report that aired on Thursday's

NSW Racing chief executive officer Peter V’landys announced at the time that every single racehorse domiciled in the state would be rehomed at retirement. An abattoir worker abuses the champion War Ends.Source: ABC . In its annual reporting , Racing Australia insists less than one per cent of

Barry O'Farrell wearing a suit and tie: Racing Australia's chief executive officer Barry O'Farrell.© ABC Racing Australia's chief executive officer Barry O'Farrell.

WARNING: GRAPHIC IMAGES

Racing Australia chief executive Barry O'Farrell has said prosecutions "should, and I suspect will, occur" following ABC's 7.30 investigation into the treatment of racehorses.

Speaking on ABC News 24's News Breakfast on Friday morning, Mr O'Farrell said that, while he was "appalled" and "shocked" by the two-year-investigation, he had absolute faith in state regulators including Racing NSW chief executive Peter V'landys.

Calls for national registry in wake of slaughterhouse investigation

  Calls for national registry in wake of slaughterhouse investigation Racing authorities have strongly condemned "horrific images" presented by the ABC following a two-year investigation, which alleges hundreds of Australian racehorses are being sent to the knackery, where they are subjected to inhumane treatment. Racing Australia's official data claims around 34 horses every year end up at slaughterhouses - a figure amounting to less than one per cent of retiring racehorses, claims the ABC.However, the national broadcaster says a two-year investigation, culminating in a report that aired on yesterday's edition of 7.30, shows the number is much higher.

Racing Australia 's official data claims about 34 racehorses every year end up at slaughterhouses, a figure amounting to less than one per cent of retiring horses. Racing NSW CEO Peter V'landys tod the ABC he was not aware of any NSW racehorses being sent to slaughterhouses.

The Australian greyhound racing live baiting scandal is a series of events that occurred in at least three Australian states where live baiting of racing greyhounds was exposed on ABC TV and in The

"[State racing chief executives] are doing everything they can just to ensure the sport of racing thrives and flourishes, but also that responsibility for equine welfare is as high as possible within their jurisdictions," he said. "Of course we condemn it."

Mr O'Farrell also questioned the actions of activists involved in the investigation, asking why they didn't blow "the whistle earlier".

"Let's not conflate two issues. That facility we saw last night, and those unacceptable practices, is a state abattoir in Queensland. Those practices that I saw, I know from my background in state politics, are serious offences under state animal welfare legislation," he said.

a close up of a horse: The program shocked viewers with many calling for the industry to be held accountable.© ABC 7.30 The program shocked viewers with many calling for the industry to be held accountable.

"I think the program last night said the activists had been taking vision for a number of years. Why wouldn't they have blown the whistle earlier to stop this inhumane treatment?"

'Someone's been asleep': racing industry in shock at animal cruelty revelations

  'Someone's been asleep': racing industry in shock at animal cruelty revelations Racing NSW chief executive Peter V'landys downplayed concerns about the extent of the problem in NSW, pointing out it was the only state that had banned a retired horse from being sent to a knackery or abattoir. But several high-ranking sources within the industry expressed concerns that regulators, including Racing NSW, had been too slow to act after similar abuse allegations were levelled against greyhounds in 2015."I must say, it takes a fair bit to rock me out of my seat, and the program did that very thing," Mr Hartigan told the Herald.

The Office of the Commonwealth Director of Public Prosecutions or, informally, the Commonwealth Director of Public Prosecutions (CDPP) is an independent prosecuting service and government agency within the portfolio of the Attorney-General of Australia

Tatts Group chief executive Robbie Cooke says if allegations of widespread cheating and shocking animal cruelty in the greyhound industry implicate A screenshot of the Four Corners program on the greyhound racing industry. Credit: ABC . Mr Cooke said the individuals involved should be "hauled up

The ABC report, which aired on Thursday night's 7.30, uncovered alleged acts of animal cruelty on a mass scale, with allegations that hundreds of Australian racehorses were being sent to the slaughterhouse.

Mr V'landys said on 2GB on Friday morning that his office had been receiving "hate mail" after the program aired and was being told to "get cancer and die". Mr V'landys said the issues lay with the Queensland jurisdiction and that he was "proud" of his state's efforts to rehome racehorses.

"Out of 10,000 horses, we rehomed almost every one of them ... the ABC never returned our calls to give them that advice," he said.

The report cited official data from Racing Australia claiming less than 1 per cent of retired horses end up in an abattoir, which translates to 34 horses every year.

Elio Celotto, from the Coalition for the Protection of Racehorses, said his group had been watching and recording the daily activities of the Meramist Abattorior, located north of Brisbane, for the past two years. Mr Celotto told 7.30 that about 4000 racehorses had been killed in the one abattoir alone. The 7.30 report also investigated a number of NSW facilities.

Mr V'landys said Racing NSW spent $2.5 million a year rehoming horses.

"This is not happening in NSW...to be portrayed so unfairly, it was really disturbing," he said.

It's not just horses who are discarded from the racing industry .
One of the reasons so many former jockeys, trainers and stablehands lose their way is because there is no place for them in the industry once they retire or become incapacitated. For some it’s easy to find a new career path but for others when the sport they grew up in turns its back on them they have no other circles of friends and nowhere to go.As jockeys are employees of Racing Victoria when they are injured and receiving Workcover they’re often made to come in to the office or go to the races and perform some light duties as part of their return to work.

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