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Australia How The Sinaloa Cartel Bested The Mexican Army

04:50  19 october  2019
04:50  19 october  2019 Source:   time.com

Son of Mexican drug lord 'El Chapo' captured

  Son of Mexican drug lord 'El Chapo' captured The arrest in western Mexico triggers gun battles between security forces and drug cartel members.They say this happened in the western city of Culiacán, the stronghold of the powerful Sinaloa drug cartel.

How The Sinaloa Cartel Bested The Mexican Army . Smoke from burning cars rises due in Culiacan, Mexico , Thursday, Oct. In contrast, the Mexican military was in shambles. Officials made contradictory and confusing statements about why the soldiers had gone to Guzman’s house without

Mexico 's Ministry of National Defense (Sedena) has announced the seizure of ,350,000 U.S. currency (more than 125 million pesos), 6 kilograms of cocaine

Video provided by Sky News Australia

In Mexico’s big cities, drug cartel gunmen normally act like phantoms. They hide in safe houses or amid communities, suddenly striking with an assassination or a gunfight, and then disappearing again. Residents know they are there and are scared, but most the time, they can’t see them.

But on Thursday in the Sinaloan city of Culiacan, the cartel gunmen were everywhere. They openly drove in trucks with mounted machine guns, blockaded streets flashing their Kalashnikovs and burned trucks unleashing plumes of smoke like it was a scene in Syria. They took control of the strategic points in the metro area, shut down the airport, roads, and government buildings and exchanged fire with security forces for hours, leaving at least eight people dead. In contrast, everyone else had to act like ghosts, hiding behind locked doors, not daring to step outside.

Fierce gun battle rocks El Chapo's bastion in Mexico

  Fierce gun battle rocks El Chapo's bastion in Mexico Heavily armed gunmen in four-by-four trucks fought an intense battle with Mexican security forces Thursday in the city of Culiacan, capital of jailed kingpin Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman's home state of Sinaloa. Sustained, heavy gunfire rocked the western city of 750,000 people in a battle that left blazing vehicles strewn across the street and sent terrified residents running for shelter, said AFP journalists at the scene.

Heavy gunfights broke out in a Sinaloa cartel stronghold after Mexican security forces arrested a son of drug lord El Chapo. Earlier, Mexican security chief Alfonso Durazo said 30 members of the National Guard and army were patrolling in Culiacan when they were fired upon from a nearby house.

Sinaloa 's strongest competitor is its former armed wing, the Jalisco New Generation cartel . Formed around 2010, the Jalisco cartel has expanded rapidly and aggressively across Mexico and is now challenging Sinaloa for Can Mexico save its journalists? The Mexican doctor rehydrating the dead.

And in this unusual battle, the Sinaloa Cartel won. Their uprising was in response to soldiers storming a house on Thursday and arresting Ovidio Guzman, the 28-year old son of convicted kingpin Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman. In February, the U.S. Justice Department announced it had indicted Ovidio Guzman on trafficking cocaine, marijuana and meth. But after hours of cartel chaos, Mexico’s federal government gave soldiers the go ahead to release him. It capitulated.

Pictures: Sinaloa - El Chapo''s birthplace

a person wearing a costume: A souvenir of Joaquin El Chapo Guzman is pictured in a store at the Saint Jesus Malverde chapel in Culiacan, in Mexico's state of Sinaloa. REUTERS/Daniel Becerril

I’ve covered Mexico’s drug violence for 18 years, written two books about the subject, and seen many extraordinary episodes. In Sinaloa, the cradle of drug traffickers, I’ve repeatedly been on the crime beat chasing bullet-ridden corpses and into the mountains to Guzman’s opium-growing village. But Thursday was different. It wasn’t gangster action; it was a mass insurrection.

El Chapo's son involved in police shootout

  El Chapo's son involved in police shootout The son of infamous drug lord "El Chapo" was arrested briefly by security forces before cartel gang members freed him after a wild gun battle in the streets of a Mexican city. Ovidio Guzman Lopez was one of four men taken into custody when National Guard officers stormed a house in Culiacan city, in the country's west, around 3.30pm local time, CNBC reported. 1/5 SLIDES © Mexico Police Ovidio Guzman Lopez, son of El Chapo, was arrested briefly today in Mexico.

Alone among the Mexican cartels , Sinaloa is both diversified and vertically integrated, producing The cartel bribes mayors and prosecutors and governors, state police and federal police, the army Just how active the cartel is north of the border is a divisive question. According to the Department of

Mexico 's Ministry of National Defense (Sedena) has announced the seizure of ,350,000 U.S. currency (more than 125 million pesos), 6 kilograms of cocaine and 4 weapons from a home in Tijuana, Baja California.

“There was panic, terror, the city was under siege,” says Vladimir Ramirez, a political scientist in Culiacan, who like many has continued curfew into Friday. “People slept wherever they were at. Businesses are closed, nobody wants to go out.”

a factory with smoke coming out of it: Smoke from burning cars rises due in Culiacan, Mexico, Thursday, Oct. 17, 2019. © Hector Parra—AP Smoke from burning cars rises due in Culiacan, Mexico, Thursday, Oct. 17, 2019.

This change has not come overnight. It is the result of a bloody trend of cartels developing insurgent tactics over many years. The use of burning vehicles to block roads was taken from militant protesters; cartels use it to stop the movement of troops and put pressure on the government. The cartels have armed up with stolen military weapons and an endless stream of rifles from the United States. Between 2007 and 2018, more than 150,000 firearms seized in Mexico were traced to U.S. gun shops and factories.And cartels from the Texas border to Guadalajara have learned to protect their leaders with rings of gunmen who can cause trouble to stop their capture.

Street Battles Break Out in Culiacán, Mexico, After Arrest of El Chapo’s Son

  Street Battles Break Out in Culiacán, Mexico, After Arrest of El Chapo’s Son Cartel gunmen paralyzed a major Mexican city on Thursday, unleashing hails of automatic gunfire in broad daylight and blockading major thoroughfares. MEXICO CITY — Cartel gunmen paralyzed a major Mexican city on Thursday, unleashing hails of automatic gunfire in broad daylight and blockading major thoroughfares in a staggering show of force after the arrest of Ovidio Guzmán López, the son of the infamous drug lord Joaquín Guzmán Loera.

Mexico maelstrom: how the drug violence got so bad. The leakage of Mexican special forces into organized crime began in the 1990s when the powerful Gulf cartel recruited a group of ex-Gafe troops to create its own paramilitary enforcement unit, known as Los Zetas.

Intense fighting has erupted in the Mexican city of Culiacán, where masked gunmen threw up burning barricades and traded gunfire with security forces after authorities arrested one of the sons of the jailed former leader of the Sinaloa drug cartel Joaquín “El Chapo” Guzmán.

Yet it was still shocking on Thursday to see how fast the cartel moved and how brazenly the gunmen stayed on the streets. Residents took dozens of photos of the armed thugs that circulated on social media, amplifying the threat. And it was almost a side note that there was a simultaneous prison break in which 51 inmates fled.

“The Sinaloa Cartel demonstrated a tremendous ability to mobilize rapidly and take effective control of the city,” says Raul Benitez, an expert on Latin America’s armed conflicts. “They showed that in Sinaloa, they are the ones who run things.”

In contrast, the Mexican military was in shambles. Officials made contradictory and confusing statements about why the soldiers had gone to Guzman’s house without enough back up. In many points in the city, the cartel gunmen went unchallenged. There were reports that the cartel had held various soldiers hostage and threatened to kill them. And in these circumstances, it was best to let the suspect go, President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador said Friday.

“You can’t fight fire with fire…We don’t want deaths. We don’t want war,” Lopez Obrador said in his morning press conference. “With justice, we will guarantee peace and tranquility in the country.”

After Soldiers Surrender El Chapo’s Son, a Shocked Mexican City Sighs With Relief

  After Soldiers Surrender El Chapo’s Son, a Shocked Mexican City Sighs With Relief In the days following the siege of the city of Culiacán by the Sinaloa cartel, residents were overcome with relief: Relief that the terror is over. That more people did not die. And that government forces, which had captured the son of the former cartel leader Joaquín Guzmán Loera, known as “El Chapo,” handed back their target rather than keep waging a bloody battle.

The Sinaloa Cartel (Spanish: Cártel de Sinaloa ), also known as the Guzmán-Loera Organization, the Pacific Cartel , the Federation and the Blood Alliance, is an international drug trafficking, money laundering, and organized crime syndicate established during the late 1980s.

1 (UPI) -- The Mexican army killed three suspected members of Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman's Sinaloa Cartel in a gunfight, including René "El Talibán" The Mexican soldiers engaged Sunday in an early morning shootout with members of the Sinaloa Cartel 's Los Antrax branch, which reports to Ismael

Lopez Obrador won power last year in a landslide election and still enjoys high approval ratings. His decision Thursday to avoid further bloodshed earned support from some. Ramirez, the political scientist in Culiacan, says that the gunmen in Culiacan were not attacking civilians but the menace was clear and they could have unleashed a bloodbath. “It was a threat of terrorism,” Ramirez says. “The government acted with great responsibility.”

Others criticized Lopez Obrador for surrendering to criminals. “His idea of peace and love doesn’t work. He is making the cartel stronger,” Benitez says. “I don’t even know what his strategy is.”

The worry now is that Mexican’s government’s decision to release Guzman sets a precedent. If other traffickers are arrested, their cohorts could kidnap people to demand their release. It also raises the specter of the cartel appearing more powerful than the army, which could have implications for governability. There has long been an image of traffickers as rebels and some in Sinaloa call them “valientes” or “brave ones.” Now it appears like these rebels are almost in control.

This support for drug traffickers is reflected in songs known as narco corridos or drug ballads that celebrate their exploits. Following Thursday’s carnage, various songwriters quickly penned brand new lyrics about Ovidio Guzman and posted their verses online.

“Rumors are heard, they are taking Ovidio Guzman. In the moment, there are mobilizations,” a singer croons in one, “The señor, they won’t take him prisoner. There is war and we’re going to fight.”

Mexican town turned to war zone fears new era of narco violence .
There is no telling when the narco violence that terrorized the Mexican city last week could return. People in Culiacan are used to living alongside drug traffickers. It is, after all, the state capital of Sinaloa, home to the powerful drug cartel of the same name and its jailed kingpin, Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman.

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