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Australia A cauldron of extreme heat developing in WA is heading straight for the east coast bushfire zone

01:06  15 november  2019
01:06  15 november  2019 Source:   abc.net.au

WA fire warnings issued, with Perth set to hit 38C this weekend

  WA fire warnings issued, with Perth set to hit 38C this weekend Fire authorities prepare for a challenging weekend as scorching temperatures and gusty winds create dangerous fire conditions in the southern half of WA, including Perth where the mercury is expected to get as high as 38 degrees.The temperature will soar to the high 30s in Perth on Saturday and east-to-north-easterly winds are expected to reach up to 40 kilometres per hour, prompting a severe fire danger warning.

Australian authorities have warned that massive bushfires raging in two states will continue to pose a threat, despite "catastrophic" conditions easing. Australia 's government has often avoided questions on whether climate change could have contributed to the fires , in a response that has drawn criticism.

The fire is heading towards east towards Kempsey, with those in the town's west under threat. Fire chiefs warned that conditions could be so bad that it will be too dangerous for firefighters to try to put out the flames.

A build-up of intense heat that will see temperatures in WA soar into the mid 40s this weekend will be dragged across the country next week, right into areas where bushfires are raging.© ABC News Images A build-up of intense heat that will see temperatures in WA soar into the mid 40s this weekend will be dragged across the country next week, right into areas where bushfires are raging.

A build-up of intense heat that will see temperatures in WA soar into the mid 40s this weekend will be dragged across the country next week, right into parts of New South Wales and Queensland devastated by bushfires this week.

The NSW and Queensland bushfires have already burnt through more than a million hectares of land, killing four people and destroying more than 300 homes.

Bureau of Meteorology spokesman Neil Bennett said milder temperatures were expected to provide some relief to parts of NSW where fires continue to burn over the next few days, but the bushfire threat was far from over with the heat expected to ramp up again.

Residents evacuated as fast-moving Queensland fire splits in two

  Residents evacuated as fast-moving Queensland fire splits in two Residents are being told to leave their homes after a bushfire burning southwest of Brisbane split in two and another burns near Noosa. A watch and act alert is currently in place for Cooroibah, near Noosa, and in Buccan, near Logan, south of Brisbane.People in those areas are being told to leave now.Residents in Thorton, Clumber and Lower Beechmont are being told to prepare to leave as separate fires burn.The Thornton blaze has split into two separate fires travelling in different directions. © 9NEWS Cooroibah residents are being evacuated as a fast-moving fire heads towards properties.

The extreme heat can take a toll on Australia ’s native fauna, as evidenced by this thirsty koala found by Alison McMeekin in Adelaide yesterday. The prolonged heat is causing havoc across NSW, where firefighters are currently battling 45 separate fires .

Meanwhile, in Western Australia ’s south, heavy rain could damage homes and make travel in parts of the state’s great southern region dangerous. Welcome to the second day of Guardian Australia’s rolling coverage of the heatwave affecting much of the country’s south- east .

The areas in dark red on the map below show parts of WA will bake in temperatures above 45 degrees Celsius over the weekend, before the hot air mass bears down on the east coast by Tuesday.

"The problem that we have with the fires on the east coast is that there will be this break now … there are some cooler temperatures, but the heat from WA could push across over the course of the middle part of next week," Mr Bennett said.

While early forecasts suggest areas in eastern parts of New South Wales and south-east Queensland will nudge 40C by Tuesday, forecasters will keep a close eye on the winds to determine whether to issue fire weather warnings.

This week a catastrophic weather warning was introduced across large parts of NSW — the first time such a high warning has been issued since it was introduced in 2009 following the Black Saturday Victorian bushfires.

Emergency warning issued for uncontrolled bushfire travelling towards Port Lincoln

  Emergency warning issued for uncontrolled bushfire travelling towards Port Lincoln An emergency bushfire warning is issued for residents in Port Lincoln with reports of an uncontrolled bushfire travelling towards the township. © ABC News A map which shows the predicted direction of a bushfire burning near Port Lincoln in South Australia. The warning was issued about 4:20pm today for the bushfire at Duck Ponds, north-east of Port Lincoln, with the region under extreme weather conditions.The Country Fire Service has warned that residents are "now in danger" and should "take shelter in a solid building"."Do not leave or enter this area in a vehicle or on foot.

Follow all the developments as they happen. Catastrophic fire danger ratings could last between three to six hours tomorrow. “The conditions for Sunday are the worst possible conditions when it comes to fire danger ratings, they are catastrophic, they are labelled catastrophic for a reason,” he said.

The South Australia country fire service (CFS) issued a catastrophic fire danger alert for the south- east region on Tuesday, and advised residents in bushfire -prone areas to get out straight away. On what is the first day back for many students, 11 South Australian schools have been closed.

All the ingredients for fires, except one

Mr Bennett said wind strength could prove the key as to how bad conditions would get on the eastern seaboard next week.

"When you have fire weather conditions that are dangerous, you need a combination of a few things — you need to have high temperatures, you need strong winds, dry conditions, low humidity and you also need to have dry vegetation," he said.

"The dry vegetation is there, if the air is coming across from WA it's travelling over land so it's dry, the temperatures are going to be warm, so all we then need to look at is what the winds are going to be like.

"If the winds start to pick up then we start to see a deterioration in the fire weather conditions as a result of that hot air starting to move across."

On Tuesday the catastrophic fire warning was issued in part due to a strong cold front which brought a rapid wind change.

The WA cauldron

The extreme heat brewing in WA could see November records tumble over the weekend.

Emergency warning issued for uncontrolled bushfire travelling towards Port Lincoln

  Emergency warning issued for uncontrolled bushfire travelling towards Port Lincoln November 11, 2019. Dr Brendan Nelson, director of the Australian War Memorial for the past seven years, reflects on the moments that have had an effect on him. He recalls a number of occasions including the performance by John Schumann of his song "I was only 19" with the late Hugh McDonald sung to 108 Vietnam veterans on the 50th anniversary of the battle of Long Tan. "Mrs Pam Palmer, crying into my shoulder, on the night of the 13th August 2013, in front of the cowling from the Black Hawke helicopter, that was used as a stretcher to bring out the body of her dead son in Kandihar in 2010 after he was killed", an emotional Dr Nelson recalls. (AAP Video/Marc Tewksbury)

The rural fire service commissioner, Shane Fitzsimmons, urged residents in bushfire -prone areas to have evacuation plans in place and to keep track of the organisation’s In Queensland very high temperatures were forecast for the southern interior and the south- east of the state at the weekend.

In October 2008, fire potential in Australia was assessed as being above average around the coast of the continent and below average inland. On 2 March, in anticipation and to create awareness of the extreme bushfire weather conditions predicted for the following days, many residents around

"We are going to see a number of places away from the west coast getting very warm temperatures and in some parts approaching records for November," Mr Bennett said.

"[It is] all because of a high pressure system that's sitting in the Bight that is going to direct hot north-easterly air over the region."

Perth is in the midst of a hot spell, with a string of four days over 35C expected — a phenomenon that has not happened in November since 1933.

The city will cool on Sunday as a trough along the west coast starts to move inland, pushing the heat to eastern parts of the state.

A maximum of 44C is forecast for Kalgoorlie on Sunday, which could topple the city's current record of 43.7C that was reached on November 24, 1923.

The source of the blistering heat, which is being dragged across the southern half of WA and interstate, is the tropical north of WA where monsoon rainfall activity is yet to begin.

"That's something that will continue until we can get some relief in the form of any significant tropical activity," Mr Bennett said.

"There's nothing on the horizon for that, certainly over the next week, so we will probably get these very hot conditions on and off now until we can start to see the monsoon [trough] really building.

"[That] may not typically occur until middle to late December."

Travellers warned of major road closures on NSW's north coast .
Travellers heading towards the New South Wales north coast are being warned of significant road closures due to bushfire activity. The warning comes as thousands of school leavers are due to make their way to schoolies festivities in Byron Bay and southern Queensland.The Pacific Highway remains closed between Woodburn and Woombah due to the Myall Creek Road bushfire in the Richmond Valley.In pictures: Bushfires leave devastating trail across NSW More than 10,000 lightning strikes have been detected over the Gospers Mountain fire on the state's Central Coast today.

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