Australia: Offshore detention is set to cost Australians more than $1billion over the next three years as debate over medevac laws continues - - PressFrom - Australia
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Australia Offshore detention is set to cost Australians more than $1billion over the next three years as debate over medevac laws continues

23:51  02 december  2019
23:51  02 december  2019 Source:   dailymail.co.uk

Lambie close to deal on refugee transfers

  Lambie close to deal on refugee transfers Senate crossbencher Jacqui Lambie has indicated she is close to securing a deal with the Morrison government on refugee medical transfer laws. Senator Lambie has indicated she wants to land a deal that amends the system, without giving the government the full repeal that it wants."I think what you'll find with medevac is it may not look like it does today," she said.More than 150 refugees and asylum seekers have come to Australia under the medevac laws.The government claims the scheme weakens border protection because it limits the discretion of the minister to rule on each transfer.

Offshore detention costs Australian taxpayers as much as 3,000 a person each year, according to a report The At What Cost report, released on Tuesday by the Asylum Seeker Resource Centre, Save the Children and GetUp, showed the cost of offshore processing over the next three years

Plus: legal storm clouds gather over Trump’s lawyer. Australia’s carbon emissions would be more than 200m tonnes lower if the Greens had supported the carbon pollution Parliament resumes with the repeal of medevac laws to be debated in the Senate, as the government negotiates with Jacqui

a large building: New figures reveal offshore detention would cost taxpayers more than $1 billion over the next three years (Pictured: Detention centre on Manus Island)© Provided by Daily Mail New figures reveal offshore detention would cost taxpayers more than $1 billion over the next three years (Pictured: Detention centre on Manus Island) New figures reveal offshore detention would cost taxpayers more than $1 billion over the next three years, as debate around the government's medevac repeal bill continues.

A report released on Tuesday by Save the Children, GetUp and the Asylum Seeker Resource Centre breaks down the cost of offshore detention to $573,000 per offshore person, per year.

GetUp human rights director Shen Narayanasamy said the scheme was costly and should be put to an end.

Labor were 'warned' about the Medevac bill: Dutton

  Labor were 'warned' about the Medevac bill: Dutton Peter Dutton has strongly urged the Senate abolish the Medevac bill by weeks end as people of "bad character" are continuing to slip through under the current legislation. The Morrison government is hoping for Senator Jacqui Lambie's support in order to repeal the legislation, which is listed for debate in the Senate on Wednesday.Senator Lambie met with Prime Minister Scott Morrison on Monday, but is yet to comment publicly on her position.

And it was announced that the Christmas Island detention centre would be reopened at a cost of more than $ 1 University of Sydney immigration law specialist Mary Crock told SBS News that Australia's history In total over the Rudd-Gillard-Rudd years , more than 50,000 people arrived and at least 1

It estimated offshore processing is costing the Australian government more than 3,000 per offshore person annually. Senator Lambie held more talks with Mr Morrison and Home Affairs Minister Peter Dutton on Monday as the government opened up the debate to scrap the medevac

'The responsibility for this $1.2 billion cost sits squarely with this government's abject failure to resolve the offshore situation,' she said.

'Keeping people detained offshore indefinitely isn't just morally irresponsible, it makes no economic sense.'

The report, based on the 535 people who remain in offshore detention centres, comes as the Senate prepares to vote on whether medical evacuation laws should be repealed.

The medevac laws, passed against the government's wishes, give doctors a greater say in transferring refugees from offshore detention to Australia for medical treatment.

Debate around the legislation is expected to continue on Tuesday, after Prime Minister Scott Morrison on Monday met with Senator Jacqui Lambie.

Lambie tight-lipped on medevac negotiation

  Lambie tight-lipped on medevac negotiation Tasmanian senator Jacqui Lambie says talks over a deal to scrap the medevac laws are progressing nicely. She said she was in constructive talks with Prime Minister Scott Morrison and Home Affairs Minister Peter Dutton."I can't feed out to any media what the condition is. Right now the talks are going along really, really nicely," she told AAP on Thursday."There's a game of trust there between myself, the PM and Minister Dutton and I will not put that at risk."New Zealand has long offered to take 150 refugees per year from Australia's offshore processing centres in Papua New Guinea and Nauru.

This article is more than 3 years old. Australia's offshore detention cost $ 1 .2bn in 2014-15, Senate estimates told. However, the government said it continued to plan for Abyan’s removal regardless. More than m was spent in the three months between July and September this year.

The Australian government will be reopening the Christmas Island detention center Migrants had to jump through numerous legal hoops, many of which are still in place, before they Morrison refused to disclose the cost of reopening the center, which closed in October last year after running for 10 years .

Peter Dutton wearing a suit and tie: Home Affairs Minister Peter Dutton is hoping to repeal the controversial medavac laws© Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited Home Affairs Minister Peter Dutton is hoping to repeal the controversial medavac laws She has offered to back the repeal bill on one condition but will not say what that is on national security grounds.

It is believed the condition could centre on the government accepting New Zealand's longstanding offer to resettle some asylum seekers in offshore detention.

Mr Morrison has ruled out changing the government's policy to not accept the deal.

Labor's home affairs spokeswoman Kristina Keneally urged the Senate to block the medevac repeal bill, saying the laws are working as intended.

'Denying people medical care is un-Australian. It is inhumane. It is uncompassionate,' she said.

Meanwhile, more than one third of asylum seekers and refugees currently on Papua New Guinea and Nauru have applied for transfer to Australia in a rush to get in before parliament repeals the bill, The Australian reports.

A total of 171 people had applied, with the applications in various stages of approval, the paper said on Monday.

Lambie 'told refugees will be resettled' .
Senator Jacqui Lambie backed the repeal of medevac laws after she was assured refugees in offshore detention centres could be resettled in New Zealand. The repealed medical evacuations laws, which initially passed against the government's wishes, had allowed people in offshore detention to be transferred on the recommendation of two independent doctors.But after the laws were repealed on Wednesday, Mr Morrison said at a press conference there had been no deal with the senator to get her deciding vote.

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