•   
  •   

Australia SA in second move to lift GM crops ban

00:45  03 december  2019
00:45  03 december  2019 Source:   msn.com

Hong Kong voters queue up early over fears of later clashes

  Hong Kong voters queue up early over fears of later clashes Many see the polls as a "referendum" on support for the anti-government protest movement, coming as the city grapples with its biggest political crisis in decades. A stand-off at Polytechnic University on Sunday entered its seventh day, with the campus surrounded by police as some protesters remained in classrooms and first aid workers roamed the campus.As voting got underway at 7:30 a.m.

"New and improved crop varieties will also help farmers tackle drought and climate change as we look to provide our grain growers with as many tools as SA -BEST MPs said their decision to support the disallowance motion came because the government had tried to sidestep normal parliamentary

The SA government is trying to lift a ban on genetically modified crops on the SA mainland. SA 's GM ban was first imposed in 2003 and was due to remain in place until at least 2025. An independent review earlier this year also found the ban had cost the state's farmers up to million over the past

The South Australian government is having a second crack at lifting a ban on genetically-modified crops, this time through legislation.© AAP Images The South Australian government is having a second crack at lifting a ban on genetically-modified crops, this time through legislation.

The South Australian government is having a second crack at lifting a ban on genetically-modified crops, this time through legislation.

The government recently introduced regulations to lift the ban from December, but they were disallowed by parliament last week.

Primary Industries Minister Tim Whetstone says he'll now bring a bill to parliament on Tuesday to lift the moratorium on the SA mainland in a bid to help farmers grow the economy and create jobs.

Farmers are still managing to harvest crops in drought. Here's how they're doing it

  Farmers are still managing to harvest crops in drought. Here's how they're doing it The drought is relentless but some grain growers are still managing to harvest crops, and what they have discovered could be the way of the future.Mark Swift has watched as it has blown onto his property and he has noted how "constant" it has become.

Tuesday, 20 August 2019 SA seeks to lift ban on mainland GM crops | Sky Australia South Australia plans to lift a 16-year ban on genetically - modified crops

A long-standing ban on genetically - modified crops in South Australia will be lifted from December. The state government has gazetted new regulations to allow GM crops on the SA mainland after taking community feedback during a six-week consultation period. However, the ban will remain on

"Last week we were challenged to bring forward legislation so we are doing exactly that and we will be asking the parliament to deal with the Bill this week to provide our farmers with certainty for planning their 2020 crop," Mr Whetstone said.

"New and improved crop varieties will also help farmers tackle drought and climate change as we look to provide our grain growers with as many tools as possible."

In parliament's upper house last week, Labor, the Greens and SA-BEST combined to strike out the government's previous regulations.

SA-BEST MPs said their decision to support the disallowance motion came because the government had tried to sidestep normal parliamentary procedures.

SA's GM ban was first imposed in 2003 and was due to remain in place until at least 2025.

An independent review earlier this year also found the ban had cost the state's farmers up to $33 million over the past 15 years.

But supporters of the ban argue the restrictions give local producers an advantage on national and international markets with buyers willing to pay more for "clean and green" produce.

Mr Whetstone said if the new bill does not pass the parliament the government will reconsider its regulatory options.

Tonnes of hail-damaged fruit mulched after fears of another fruit fly outbreak in Riverland .
The fear of fruit fly is forcing Riverland growers to mulch their damaged stone fruit crops after a vicious hail storm last month. In less than half an hour, the November 4 hail storm that hit Barmera, Monash, Glossop, and parts of Renmark shredded grape vines and potholed stone fruit, citrus, and nut crops. "I was at the house talking to somebody and couldn't even hear the telephone...it was on the roof and then it got bigger and bigger," Mr Pilgrim said."I talked to the next door neighbour and he reckoned 90 to 100 per cent [of crop was damaged]; then I got PIRSA to come out and they agreed.

Topical videos:

usr: 1
This is interesting!