•   
  •   

Australia None of the 200 asylum seekers transferred to Australia under controversial medevac laws is being treated in hospital

23:50  03 december  2019
23:50  03 december  2019 Source:   dailymail.co.uk

Lambie close to deal on refugee transfers

  Lambie close to deal on refugee transfers Senate crossbencher Jacqui Lambie has indicated she is close to securing a deal with the Morrison government on refugee medical transfer laws. Senator Lambie has indicated she wants to land a deal that amends the system, without giving the government the full repeal that it wants."I think what you'll find with medevac is it may not look like it does today," she said.More than 150 refugees and asylum seekers have come to Australia under the medevac laws.The government claims the scheme weakens border protection because it limits the discretion of the minister to rule on each transfer.

None of those transferred remained in hospital as of Thursday and almost two-thirds were "not even outpatients", a Senate hearing has been told. Only four of the 111 refugees and asylum seekers transferred to Australia under controversial medical transfer laws have been admitted to hospital

179 people have been transferred to Australia under the medevac laws . The federal government hopes to pass legislation to repeal the laws this week, but it faces the threat of a second major defeat at the hands of a hostile Senate. Pictures: UN refugee report - top countries of origin and asylum .

Not a single asylum seeker allowed into Australia under medevac laws is in hospital, new figures show.

Since the law came into place early this year, 184 asylum seekers have been transferred to Australia from offshore detention - but none of them still require hospital care.

Most are living in community detention, provided with a place to live, health and welfare services while their applications are processed.

a group of men standing next to a wire fence: Asylum seekers staring at media from behind a fence at the Oscar compound in the Manus Island detention centre, Papua New Guinea in 2016© Provided by Daily Mail Asylum seekers staring at media from behind a fence at the Oscar compound in the Manus Island detention centre, Papua New Guinea in 2016

A few of them are being held offshore due to criminal or security risks, reported the Sydney Morning Herald.

Labor were 'warned' about the Medevac bill: Dutton

  Labor were 'warned' about the Medevac bill: Dutton Peter Dutton has strongly urged the Senate abolish the Medevac bill by weeks end as people of "bad character" are continuing to slip through under the current legislation. The Morrison government is hoping for Senator Jacqui Lambie's support in order to repeal the legislation, which is listed for debate in the Senate on Wednesday.Senator Lambie met with Prime Minister Scott Morrison on Monday, but is yet to comment publicly on her position.

It enables asylum seekers and refugees held under Australia ’s offshore processing arrangements to be transferred to Australia for medical treatment or Australian Institute of Health and Welfare statistics indicate that in 2016-17, 695 public hospitals in Australia provided 62,000 hospital beds.

“With 250 cases now being considered by doctors under the medevac laws , this is a Dutton had previously said 531 had been accepted under the terms of the US deal, with another 295 Refugees and asylum seekers brought to the mainland for treatment remain under guard and are escorted to

There are 208 asylum seekers on Papua New Guinea and 258 on Nauru - and more than two thirds have applied for transfer to Australia under medevac laws.

The laws allow an asylum seeker to be transferred to Australia from offshore detention if a doctor says they have a serious medical condition.

Supporters say they are humane and should be kept in place but critics say doctors can exaggerate ailments to give asylum seekers a free ticket to the mainland.

The federal government wants to repeal the laws, saying there is no way to transfer an asylum seeker back offshore after their treatment.

The figures emerged after a report found Australian taxpayers are spending up to $537,000 per year on each asylum seeker and refugee held offshore.

Lambie tight-lipped on medevac negotiation

  Lambie tight-lipped on medevac negotiation Tasmanian senator Jacqui Lambie says talks over a deal to scrap the medevac laws are progressing nicely. She said she was in constructive talks with Prime Minister Scott Morrison and Home Affairs Minister Peter Dutton."I can't feed out to any media what the condition is. Right now the talks are going along really, really nicely," she told AAP on Thursday."There's a game of trust there between myself, the PM and Minister Dutton and I will not put that at risk."New Zealand has long offered to take 150 refugees per year from Australia's offshore processing centres in Papua New Guinea and Nauru.

Asylum seekers who have been approved for medevac transfers to Australia are among 52 men who He was approved under medevac and was very hopeful to get off of that place after seven years but unfortunately Satah was one of the first men transferred to Bomana, evidently despite

Asylum - seekers found to be genuine refugees have been detained on the island since mid-2013 The other was in an Australian hospital at the time, and was later given permission to remain in Pamela Curr of the Asylum Seeker Resource Centre accused Kenny of forcing his way into Abyan's

Advocacy groups have released new figures showing offshore processing will cost $1.2 billion over the next three years.

The report - released on Tuesday by the Asylum Seeker Resource Centre, Save the Children and GetUp - comes as the Senate debates the repeal of medevac laws.

The calculations are based on 535 people being held offshore, although this number has since fallen to 466 asylum seekers and refugees.

a tree in front of a house: The exterior of the residential section of the Manus Island Immigration Detention centre in Papua New Guinea in 2011© Provided by Daily Mail The exterior of the residential section of the Manus Island Immigration Detention centre in Papua New Guinea in 2011

'Whilst the human cost of Australia's six-year failure to find a solution for all those people trapped offshore remains devastating, so too is the economic impact for a government increasingly in search of fiscal savings,' the report said.

'A solution should be found urgently - to the benefit of both these people and the budget bottom line.'

'The boats could start up again' if controversial medevac laws are not repealed

  'The boats could start up again' if controversial medevac laws are not repealed Sky News contributor Warren Mundine says controversial medevac laws "are not really about the health of the people on Manus and Nauru Islands" but are instead "just a backdoor way of getting people in to Australia".The Coalition is planning to repeal the medevac bill when parliament sits for the final time in 2019.

The medevac bill is law : what does that mean for ailing offshore refugees? The medevac law was intended to create a streamlined process to ensure sick refugees and asylum seekers on Manus Island and Nauru could be brought to Australia – on the recommendation of two doctors – for healthcare

The medevac laws set out conditions by which sick refugees and asylum seekers on Nauru and Manus Island can be transferred to Australia for medical treatment . Even if two or more treating doctors give medical advice that a person needs to be evacuated, the home affairs minister has

The report found it would be significantly cheaper to detain asylum seekers on the Australian mainland, and even less expensive to keep them in the community on bridging visas.

Reverend Tim Costello, from the Community Council of Australia, travelled to Parliament House on Tuesday to urge the Senate to keep the medevac laws in place.

He dismissed the government's argument asylum seeker boats to Australia would restart under medevac, saying that would have happened already.

'I think anxiety and fear ... has damaged the Australian soul, we've become fearful,' he said.

The laws, which passed against the government's wishes, gave doctors a greater say in transferring refugees from offshore detention to Australia for medical treatment.

Debate on the legislation continued on Tuesday, as independent senator Jacqui Lambie weighs up whether to support the repeal.

Senator Lambie has offered to back the repeal bill on one condition, but will not say what her ultimatum involves.

It is believed the condition could centre on the government accepting New Zealand's longstanding offer to resettle some asylum seekers in offshore detention.

Coalition forges ahead with medevac repeal

  Coalition forges ahead with medevac repeal The Senate will vote this week on whether to repeal the medevac laws, as the government continues its negotiations with crucial crossbenchers.  More than 20 refugees have reportedly been flown to Australia under the controversial medevac laws even though they were approved for relocation to the United States. An Iranian man, accused of setting an accommodation block alight on Manus Island, was also moved to the country on mental health grounds, according to The Australian newspaper.The fate of the legislation rests with crossbench Senator Jacqui Lambie, whose support has not yet been secured.

Medevac bill yet to become law but is already threatened by new Nauru telemedicine ban. Scott Morrison has backed a claim by Peter Dutton that the arrival of refugees to Australia for medical Exceptions are only allowed with the permission of the cabinet. Under the new law , registered health

Inquiry hears that asylum seekers detained in PNG do not have access to phones, preventing medical “ Of the 72 transitory persons transferred to Australia under the [ medevac provisions], 39 had The stakes could hardly be higher. As that choice nears, the Guardian, as it has done for 200

Scott Morrison has ruled out accepting the New Zealand deal.

'Our policies on those matters haven't changed,' the prime minister said.

a building with a grassy field: The detention centre accommodation on Nauru is pictured in June 2007© Provided by Daily Mail The detention centre accommodation on Nauru is pictured in June 2007

More than one third of asylum seekers and refugees in Papua New Guinea and Nauru have applied for transfer to Australia, according to government figures provided to The Australian.

A total of 171 people have lodged applications, hoping to secure transfers soon, in case parliament decides to unwind the medevac scheme.

Former MP Kerryn Phelps has accused the government of deliberately leaking people's private medical information to discredit the medevac scheme.

Dr Phelps, who helped pass the medevac laws, wants the apparent leaks investigated.

The government has previously claimed the medevac laws would place strain on hospitals and public housing.

'None of that has happened,' Opposition Leader Anthony Albanese told reporters.

'The truth is that this is measured legislation. It's simple legislation. It provides for the basic view that if someone needs health care, who we are responsible for, they should receive it. It's as simple as that.'


Lambie 'told refugees will be resettled' .
Senator Jacqui Lambie backed the repeal of medevac laws after she was assured refugees in offshore detention centres could be resettled in New Zealand. The repealed medical evacuations laws, which initially passed against the government's wishes, had allowed people in offshore detention to be transferred on the recommendation of two independent doctors.But after the laws were repealed on Wednesday, Mr Morrison said at a press conference there had been no deal with the senator to get her deciding vote.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

usr: 5
This is interesting!