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Australia Should Australia be in PISA shock?

05:40  08 december  2019
05:40  08 december  2019 Source:   watoday.com.au

Australian students behind in maths, reading and science, PISA education study shows

  Australian students behind in maths, reading and science, PISA education study shows A worldwide study of more than half a million 15-year-olds shows Australian students lag 3.5 years behind their Chinese counterparts in maths — and their performance in all three major subjects is in long-term decline. The 2018 Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) report, out today, found for the first time since the survey began some Australian states scored below the OECD average in maths literacy. As well as lagging well behind Chinese children in maths, the study also found Australian students had fallen more than a year behind their Singaporean counterparts in reading.

PISA - shock around the world. This PISA shock had real policy impact in Germany, leading to a Contributing further to Australia ’s PISA shock was the extensive media coverage given in January What we should be doing with PISA results. As suggested above, PISA provides important data for

PISA - shock around the world. This PISA shock had real policy impact in Germany, leading to a large number of reform measures, both at national and Länder (states) levels, aimed at improving Germany’s subsequent PISA performance. We note here that Germany, like Australia

a man wearing a suit and tie smiling at the camera: Education expert Peter Adams© Supplied Education expert Peter Adams

Should Australia’s 2018 PISA results be sending shock waves through Australian education given our continuing downward trajectory on the world’s largest assessment of reading, mathematics and science?

Germany experienced ‘PISA shock’ in 2000 when, contrary to expectations, its scores were not only below the OECD average but, in a country which has historically prided itself on its egalitarianism, the results showed a strong link between socio-economic status and student performance. Disadvantaged and immigrant students did poorly when compared to others. The nation’s self-perception of a high-performing and equitable system was seriously shaken. In response, Germany doubled education spending, with much greater support to disadvantaged and immigrant students, and early childhood education was massively expanded.

'Alarm bells': Australian students record worst result in global tests

  'Alarm bells': Australian students record worst result in global tests Australian students have failed for the first time to exceed the OECD average in maths, while NSW recorded the country's biggest drops in reading and science.Australian students have recorded their worst results in international tests, failing for the first time to exceed the OECD average in maths while also tumbling down global rankings in reading and science.

We believe Australia also experienced PISA - shock in 2009 and this was subsequently compounded in 2012. Specifically we want to look how it played politically and educationally in Australia , the role the Australian media played and most importantly what Australia should be doing about its PISA - shock .

We believe Australia also experienced PISA - shock in 2009 and this was subsequently compounded in 2012. Specifically we want to look how it played politically and educationally in Australia , the role the Australian media played and most importantly what Australia should be doing about its PISA - shock .

PISA is a global snapshot of how well students can use their knowledge and skills to answer questions set in unfamiliar contexts. The PISA 2018 results for 79 participating countries and economies reconfirmed Australia’s ongoing decline in PISA scores and rankings.

PISA data perhaps have more meaning when scores are translated to differences in ‘years of schooling’. Over the years of PISA testing, Australian reading scores have fallen the equivalent of three-quarters of a year of schooling, mathematics the equivalent of one year of schooling, and science almost one year of schooling. From every viewpoint, these are a bad set of numbers. Clearly, we are in decline internationally. Should we be in shock?

Whether we should or should not be in shock, Australia certainly must seek to understand what’s going on. To do this, for example, we need to interrogate all of the PISA data to learn from it. We need to compare Australia with other declining nations in PISA, including Finland, Iceland and New Zealand. We must understand why Singapore continues to perform so well, and investigate what underlies Estonia’s ongoing success. We should consider how we might facilitate more frequent early intervention in classes for students demonstrating difficulties. Could we even emulate high-performing nations who have their best teachers teaching their most disadvantaged students? We should compare the PISA frameworks to our national curriculum to explore if any differences in performance translate to differences in student content knowledge. We must analyse our NAPLAN data against PISA results to see what that tells us.

Education Minister says 'alarm bells should be ringing' over poor student test results

  Education Minister says 'alarm bells should be ringing' over poor student test results Federal Education Minister Dan Tehan tells state and territory governments to refocus on education basics after Australian students register record low results in reading, maths and science in an international report.The Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) report, released on Tuesday, found the maths skills of Australian students have fallen back at least a year compared to their international counterparts.

The Programme for International Student Assessment ( PISA ) is a worldwide study by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)

In this letter to Dr Andreas Schleicher, director of the OECD's Programme for International Student Assessment , academics from around the world express deep concern about the impact of Pisa tests and call for a halt to the next round of testing.

We must be more discerning with some of our education spending – a clear OECD message is that more money doesn’t necessarily buy better education. When beyond meeting the necessary minimum, additional spending needs to be well targeted.

We need to examine any links between our PISA performance and the chronic shortage of maths and science teachers in this country.

Further, we just cannot accept the continuing performance divide between advantaged and disadvantaged students, and between indigenous and non-indigenous students (this gap remains measured by score differences akin to many years of schooling).

Twenty percent of Australian students did not reach Proficiency Level 2 in Reading – the level necessary to be a competent student and citizen. Even with some promising indicators of improved equity in the 2018 data, there is still a long way to go.

The percentage of our students with a ‘growth mind set’ (receptive to learning and personal development) is only slightly above the OECD average. We must know better what motivates and engages students.

Ultimately, as a nation, we need to decide if it’s ‘OK’ to be ranked in PISA alongside Germany, Sweden, New Zealand, the US and the UK, or whether we want to rank closer to our Asian neighbours, which is nearer to where we were at the turn of the century.

Peter Adams was formerly responsible for the management of the PISA 2018 program worldwide, based at the OECD, Paris.

Why WA's most talented public school students need a bigger push .
"We're seeing an increase in those kids that are at the lowest benchmarks and we're seeing a drop in the kids at the highest benchmark," WA's education boss has warned.WA Education Department director general Lisa Rodgers said there were a number of children in the system failing to achieve the growth and progress they were capable of.

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