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Australia Report gives thumbs up to pill testing

21:08  09 december  2019
21:08  09 december  2019 Source:   msn.com

Man dies from suspected drug overdose at Strawberry Fields music festival in Riverina region

  Man dies from suspected drug overdose at Strawberry Fields music festival in Riverina region The 24-year-old man was taken to the medical tent and staff were told he had taken multiple substances including GHB, MDMA and cocaine. The man suffered a cardiac arrest and was pronounced dead at 2:02am.Officers from the Murray River Police District are investigating.A lengthy statement from the festival organisers said the team worked year round to ensure the 9,500 festivalgoers were hosted in the safest possible environment. "We are completely devastated by this news," the statement said."We would like to send our sincere condolences to his family and friends during this distressing and terribly sad time.

Australia's second pill-testing trial helped saved lives, saw improved drug-taking behaviour and was well run, researchers say.© AAP Images Australia's second pill-testing trial helped saved lives, saw improved drug-taking behaviour and was well run, researchers say.

Australia's second pill-testing trial potentially saved the lives of seven music festival goers, saw less risky drug-taking behaviour and was well managed, researchers say.

But they say there needs to be clearer explanations of drug test results, with some users thinking they were getting their drugs tested for purity and not just content.

The independent report from the Australian National University looked at Canberra's second pill-testing trial held at the Groovin' The Moo festival in April, rating it a success.

No pill-testing trial for Queensland music festival season

  No pill-testing trial for Queensland music festival season An emergency doctor has warned more Queensland festival revellers could fall victim to deadly drugs masked as party pills. Health Minister Steven Miles promised to look "closely at the work currently under way in Canberra in relation to the use of pill testing as a harm-reduction strategy".Results of the Canberra trials were expected to be shared at a meeting of Australia's health ministers in late October but pill testing was pushed off the agenda as they discussed setting minimum benefits for single-room accommodation at public hospitals.

All seven festival goers whose drugs tested positive for a substance linked to mass casualties overseas dumped their drugs.

Lead researcher Anna Olsen told AAP other states should be getting on board with pill-testing.

"We do believe that given the momentum happening and this report ... it is likely that we will start to see pill testing services in Australia in the not-too-distant future," Dr Olsen said.

Pill Testing Australia's David Caldicott said the report removed a lot of the arguments critics had used to attack pill-testing.

"It really is an almost exclusively political opposition that is preventing this from being implemented," Dr Caldicott told AAP.

"This is not about pill testing anymore; this is about politicians being afraid of having a conversation about drugs policy."

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  A new once-a-month birth control pill could eventually replace daily pills A team of scientists developed a slow-release birth control pill that people only have to take once a month. The birth control pill delivers a steady stream of hormones to users. While the preliminary tests on pigs are a step in the right direction, it will likely be years until this product hits the commercial market.Visit Insider's homepage for more stories.A possible solution for the once-a-day stress of taking birth control pills for over 10 million Americans is on the way.

The report comes as NSW premier continues Gladys Berejiklian to oppose pill-testing in her state after the overdose death of a man at a festival earlier this month weeks after an inquest into six other recent deaths.

Following the inquest, the state's deputy coroner also recommended a pill testing trial.

Dr Caldicott, who is also an emergency consultant for a Canberra hospital, said the offer for the organisation to run a free trial at any music festival in Australia still stands.

More than a quarter of users said they would be taking less drugs after the test but the majority would still take drugs, albeit with harm minimisation techniques.

For most users, Dr Olsen said it was the first time they'd received health advice on their drugs from someone who wasn't a mate or their dealer.

It also said there was no evidence to suggest that pill-testing actually encouraged increased drug use.

Users also said they were more likely to avoid the drugs when they realised it wasn't what they thought they'd been sold.

ACT Health Minister Rachel Stephen-Smith said her government didn't support drug use but the report showed pill-testing worked.

"We need to continue this conversation at a national level. Across the country, we have seen too many avoidable deaths at music festivals," Ms Stephen-Smith said.

Amnesty bins to be rolled out at NSW festivals .
Amnesty bins will be available at music festivals across NSW in the wake of recommendations following a spate of drugs deaths, the premier has announced. Amnesty bins will be available at music festivals across NSW in the wake of recommendations following a spate of drugs deaths."We believe amnesty bins are a good way to increase safety so young people, if they see police don't panic and have the opportunity without questions asked to throw those pills in the bin," NSW Premier Gladys Berejiklian said. require(["inlineoutstreamAd", "c.

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