•   
  •   

Australia NSW water restrictions: What they mean for you

02:30  10 december  2019
02:30  10 december  2019 Source:   9news.com.au

Everything you need to know as the harshest water restrictions in over a decade come into effect TOMORROW - including a complete ban on hoses

  Everything you need to know as the harshest water restrictions in over a decade come into effect TOMORROW - including a complete ban on hoses A complete ban on hoses will be enforced when the toughest water restrictions in more than a decade are implemented in parts of New South Wales on Tuesday. Water restrictions in Sydney, the Blue Mountains and Illawarra will be upgraded to level two as dam levels in the region reach 45 per cent, its lowest level seen since the millennium drought. The harsher restrictions upgraded due to the crippling drought sees a complete ban on hoses, requiring residents to use a bucket and sponge to wash their cars or a watering can to tend to their gardens.

Level two water restrictions mean that gardens can only be watered before 10am or after 2pm, using a watering can or bucket. "It is about ensuring we extend the use of our water supply," NSW Minister for Water , Property and Housing Melinda Pavey told Today. " You can water your garden with a

Tougher water restrictions were introduced on Tuesday due to the drought. As NSW and other parts of the country continue to head deeper into drought, water restrictions are ready to be put in place to help homeowners and farmers cope What Sydney's new water restrictions mean for you .

Video provided by Sky News Australia

Level two water restrictions start today as parts of New South Wales continue to struggle through severe fire and drought devastation.

The tough regulations on water usage will mean anyone caught breaching them will face heavy penalties as the government tries to preserve what little water is left in the state's dams which are teetering around 45 per cent.

While parts of the state are already enforcing level two and even harsher restrictions, Greater Sydney, Blue Mountains and Illawarra regions will now also be required to monitor how much water they use.

Sydney faces level 3 water restrictions within months

  Sydney faces level 3 water restrictions within months The city may only have just adapted to level 2 water restrictions before they are increased to level 3.The city may only have just adapted to level 2 water restrictions before they are increased to level 3, which would be likely to target outdoor businesses such as nurseries and commercial car washes.

Water restrictions apply to everyone in Sydney, the Blue Mountains and the Illawarra. An increasingly variable and changing climate means we can't know with certainty how much rainfall The NSW Government's 2017 Metropolitan Water Plan is the response to these challenges and pressures.

What Sydney's new water restrictions mean for you . Skip to sections navigation Skip to content Skip to footer. Our network. Sydney will experience the strictest water restrictions in a decade when the new rules come into effect. With the Bureau of Meteorology forecasting a hot, dry summer, and

a person holding a flower: Level two water restrictions come into play in New South Wales tomorrow, December 10.© Getty Level two water restrictions come into play in New South Wales tomorrow, December 10.

The level two restrictions will be the strictest conditions Sydney has seen in over a decade.

"Given the rapid rate of decline of our dam levels we have decided to enact the next level of restrictions sooner than planned," NSW Premier Gladys Berejiklian said in a statement.

"We are experiencing one of the most severe droughts on record and we expect introducing level two restrictions to save 78.5 gigalitres of water per year."

Anyone caught breaching the tough new rules around water usage will face hefty fines with local councils taking a zero-tolerance approach.

What are the restrictions?

Melinda Pavey said if people can minimise their time in the shower by just a couple of minutes, it could save that household up to 18 litres of water.© Getty Images/iStockphoto Melinda Pavey said if people can minimise their time in the shower by just a couple of minutes, it could save that household up to 18 litres of water.

Level two water restrictions mean that gardens can only be watered before 10am or after 4pm, using a watering can or bucket.

Water restrictions for you, an endless supply for them: How a foreign corporate giant is snapping up 89 BILLION litres of Australia's H20 as the country suffers its worst drought ever

  Water restrictions for you, an endless supply for them: How a foreign corporate giant is snapping up 89 BILLION litres of Australia's H20 as the country suffers its worst drought ever Billions of litres of Australian water have been sold to a Canadian pension fund in a $490m deal with a Singaporean food company.The mega sale of Australian permanent water rights comes as the country is crippled by one of the worst droughts in its history.

Sydney will experience the strictest water restrictions in a decade when the new rules come into effect. With the Bureau of Meteorology forecasting a hot Sydneysiders use an average of 180 litres of water per person per day. But as well as meeting water restrictions , more can be done to minimise

With stage one water restrictions now in play, it’s only a matter of time before NSW faces the strictest water restrictions since 2005. 0 on the spot fines will be issued for anyone breaching new water restrictions across Sydney What do stage one water restrictions mean for you ?

"It is about ensuring we extend the use of our water supply," NSW Minister for Water, Property and Housing Melinda Pavey told Today.

"You can water your garden with a bucket outside the hours between 10 and 4, but you can't use your hose outside anymore."

She said people also need to think about how long they spend in the shower, with even taking a couple of minutes less saving as much as 18 litres of water.

"Maybe just be a little bit more careful with that washing machine, do you need to put on six loads during the week?" she added.

People will no longer be permitted to hose hard surfaces unless in an emergency and cars can only be washed with a bucket or at a commercial carwash.

Permits will also be required before filling any sized pool.

What are the penalties?

Anyone who breaches the water restrictions will be fined with residents copping $220 and businesses being hit with a $550 fine if caught.

Sydney may soon face even tighter water restrictions

  Sydney may soon face even tighter water restrictions Sydney water restrictions could be tightened even further in a matter of months as dam levels shrink during out-of-control bushfires and unprecedented drought conditions. Only yesterday water restrictions in Greater Sydney, the Illawarra and the Blue Mountains were upgraded to Level 2, triggering rules including only watering gardens with a watering can or bucket.But Level 3 would be even more stringent. The NSW government is yet to finalise the severity of Level 3 limits, but legislation would potentially target outdoor nurseries and commercial car washing companies.

Terry Randall provides an overview on what Level 2 Water Restrictions means for the residents of Port Macquarie Hastings and what you can do to conserve water .

The NSW government re-introduced water restrictions in June to protect Sydney’s supply as the city experiences one of the lowest inflows into its dams since the 1940s. 'More than 85 per cent of Greater Sydney’s water supply relies on rain. This means that our water is in short supply during prolonged

Businesses that use outdoor water, such as carwashes and public gardeners will be required to apply for an exemption and even businesses that have permits under previous restrictions are advised to contact Sydney Water to see if they are still valid.

Ms Pavey told Today that with the current bushfires and drought, level three restrictions are a real possibility for Sydney and could even come into effect as early as the beginning of next year.

Under level three restrictions, the limits on what time a garden can be watered using a bucket or watering can will be lengthened to before 9am and after 6pm and a person's time in the shower will also be limited to no greater than five minutes.

https://twitter.com/WaterNSW/status/1201634170159747074?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw

Level three restrictions are already in place for drought and fire-affected areas in Port Macquarie and Dubbo is already at level four, while Orange has been on level five restrictions since October with limits on what days and house numbers on a street are allowed to use water during the restricted times.

25,000 litres of water stolen from drought-stricken community

  25,000 litres of water stolen from drought-stricken community A water tanker and a Toyota Hilux ute pulled up to Airfield Avenue, Murwillumbah, and stole approximately 25,000 litres of drinking water. Tweed/Byron Duty Officer, Detective Chief Inspector Luke Arthurs said the act of stealing water during a time of hardship for much of New South Wales is shocking."Here in the Tweed/Byron Police District, every catchment area and LGA are in drought – and this kind of theft is not acceptable," Chief Inspector Arthurs said."Police will continue to investigate this incident and are pleading with anyone with information to contact us.

NSW water restrictions : What they mean for you . Firies face race against time to contain bushfires before temperatures soar. NSW water restrictions : What they mean for you . Sentence of dance studio child rapist delayed as he has cancer. an hour ago.

NSW Water minister Melinda Pavey speaking to media outside state parliament in Sydney about level two water restrictions for the greater Sydney region. "It was the lowest inflows and the quickest drop that we've seen in Sydney's catchment," she says. The restrictions mean hoses cannot be used by

"This is what the drought is showing us – water is an incredible resource, it's precious and we need to protect every drop until it rains," Ms Pavey said.

Why are the restrictions in place?

The restrictions on water usage in NSW are due to the low levels of water in our dam catchments.

While dam levels usually need to hit 40 per cent before level two restrictions come into play, the current drought and bushfire crisis has forced the government to take extreme measures with levels currently sitting just above 45 per cent.

In 2017, NSW was declared 100 per cent in drought and this has lasted up until today, with levels currently around 98 per cent.

The drought devastation means that water is in extremely short supply and with the recent bushfires, the state needs to conserve as much water as possible with forecasters predicting one of the hottest, driest summers we have ever seen.

https://twitter.com/BOM_au/status/1202419937253511168?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw

Ways to minimise your water usage

  • Adhere to the rules in place about watering your garden outside of the hours of 10am and 4pm.
  • Make a conscious effort to fix any tap or hose leaks around the house
  • Try and reduce the amount of washing loads you do in a week, even one less washing load saves 70 litres of water according to Sydney Water
  • Front loader washing machines are more water-efficient than top loaders
  • Cut shower times down by at least a couple of minutes or opt for taking a bath instead
  • Have a bucket handy to catch the shower water while you wait for it to heat up, then use that to water plants
  • Instead of rinsing dishes, try scraping food scraps before you load the dishwasher.
  • Make sure the dishwasher is full before you start a load
  • Rinse fruit and vegetables in a bowl rather than a running tap – then use that bowl of water for another purpose like the garden
  • Look at switching to a dual flush toilet and WELS (Water Efficiency labelling and Standards) rated showerheads and taps
  • According to Sydney Water, jeans can be washed after every five wears, or you can place them in the freezer overnight and this will also give the same results as cleaning

Arsenic found in NSW town's water supply .
Residents of a rural New South Wales town have been told to stop drinking its water after high levels of arsenic were detected in its water supply. Uralla Council, in the state's Northern Tableland region, says the level of poison that has been detected is above Australian Drinking Water Guidelines of 0.01 milligrams per litre. The current readings in Uralla are between 0.04 and 0.05 milligrams per litre.Arsenic can cause acute gastrointestinal and neurological issues. It has also been linked to skin discoloration and the development of several types of cancer.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

usr: 12
This is interesting!