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Australia ABC, Nine lose High Court bid in Chau Chak Wing defamation case

07:40  13 december  2019
07:40  13 december  2019 Source:   watoday.com.au

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  Guilty right-wing terror plotter yells at jury after they convict him Phillip Galea, 35, has been found guilty of plotting terror attacks targeting buildings in Melbourne and creating a handbook for wannabe attackers. Phillip Galea was found guilty of planning attacks on "left-wing" targets in Victoria including the Trades Hall and others between August 2015 and 2016.

The ABC and Nine Entertainment are contemplating a High Court challenge after losing an appeal against a ruling throwing out their truth defence in a second defamation case brought by Chinese-Australian businessman Chau Chak Wing . In February Mr Chau won an earlier defamation case

Chau Chak - wing (simplified Chinese: 周泽荣; traditional Chinese: 周澤榮; pinyin: Zhōu Zéróng; Sidney Lau: Jau1 Jaak6- wing 4; born 1954)

a man wearing a suit and tie: Chau Chak Wing outside the Federal Court last year.© Chris Pavlich Chau Chak Wing outside the Federal Court last year.

The ABC and Nine Entertainment Company have lost a High Court bid to appeal against a preliminary ruling throwing out their truth defence in a defamation case brought against them by Chinese-Australian businessman Chau Chak Wing.

Mr Chau, one of the country's most generous political donors, is suing the ABC and Nine, the owner of the Herald and The Age, in the Federal Court over a joint investigation that he claims painted him as a spy who "betrayed his country" to serve the interests of China and the Chinese Communist Party.

The joint investigation culminated in a Four Corners broadcast on June 5, 2017, and an accompanying article on the ABC website.

Man who paid councillor Sam Aziz $80,000 for defamation wants his money back

  Man who paid councillor Sam Aziz $80,000 for defamation wants his money back Casey councillor Sam Aziz received a significant damages payment to settle a defamation case against a local resident just months before Victoria's corruption watchdog accused him of pocketing $900,000 from a property developer. © James Taylor Cr Sam Aziz is former mayor of the City of Casey. The Age can reveal Casey resident Martin Angenent paid about $80,000 to Cr Aziz and his lawyers in May, after criticising the former mayor's cosy relationship with a developer on social media in 2017.

Chau Chak Wing leaves the Federal Court in June. Credit:Peter Rae. The ABC 's Four Corners program and an accompanying online article painted Mr Chau is also suing Fairfax separately over an article by former Asia-Pacific editor John Garnaut. That case has already been heard and Justice

Herald’s new owner, Nine , says it will appeal against the 0,000 in damages it has been ordered to pay Chau .

The High Court on Friday rejected an application by the media outlets for special leave to appeal against a decision of the Full Court of the Federal Court, which upheld a preliminary decision of Federal Court Justice Steven Rares throwing out the parties' truth defence ahead of the trial.

The outlets had hit a roadblock in August last year when Federal Court Justice Steven Rares threw out their truth defence in its entirety, leaving intact only a technical defence of qualified privilege and an argument about whether the defamatory meanings pleaded by Mr Chau were conveyed.

The Full Federal Court said in August "there are many serious problems" with the way the truth defence was pleaded.

"A circumstantial case may paint a picture, but in this case it is not clear what picture is being portrayed," the court said.

In February Mr Chau won a separate defamation case against the Herald over an online article linking him to a US bribery scandal. He was awarded $280,000 in damages.

The trial is due to start on April 14 next year and run for nine days.

Nightclub owner awarded $90,000 over defamation by police .
Melbourne nightclub owner Martha Tsamis has been awarded $90,000 in damages by a Supreme Court judge following a five-year battle with Victoria Police over defamatory comments made by a former senior officer.A jury ruled in August that media interviews given by then superintendent Brett Guerin had damaged Ms Tsamis' reputation, while his claim that her venue, Inflation nightclub was a "honey-pot" for drug dealers was substantially true.

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