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Australia Thousands of camels killed in mass cull in South Australia

05:56  15 january  2020
05:56  15 january  2020 Source:   9news.com.au

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Thousands of camels in South Australia will be shot dead from helicopters as a result of extreme heat and drought. A five-day cull started on Wednesday Some feral horses will also be killed . Image copyright Getty Images. Image caption Camels were brought to Australia in the 19th century and

Australia ’s decision to kill more than 10,000 camels by shooting them from helicopters has incensed animal-lovers on social media. But is it the only Thousands of feral camels will meet their end on Wednesday during a planned cull in the province of South Australia , where a severe drought has

a herd of horses standing on top of a dirt field: APY lands confirmed in a statement last night the cull had gone ahead and a total of 5000 camels were killed.© Facebook APY lands confirmed in a statement last night the cull had gone ahead and a total of 5000 camels were killed. Thousands of camels have been shot as part of a cull in a remote part of South Australia.

As reported by 9News, Anangu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara (APY Lands), in the north west of the state, announced its plan to kill up to 10,000 animals earlier this month.

APY lands confirmed in a statement last night the cull had gone ahead and a total of 5000 camels were killed.

"The region's first major cull of feral animals was in urgent response to threats posed to communities by an increase in the number of feral camels due to drought and extreme heat," APY said.

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The order to kill comes as a drought makes the camels more desperate for water, causing chaos in local communities. Marita Baker, an APY executive board member, told the newspaper that the camels were causing problems in her community of Kanypi.

Feral camels in South Australia will be killed to stop the animals drinking water in the drought-ravaged region. More than 10,000 camels will be culled by professional shooters in helicopters from Wednesday after an order from Aboriginal leaders in the Anangu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara lands

"More than 5000 camels were removed in an aerial control operation with backup by APY ground operations."

APY General Manager, Richard King, said the cull was done in "the most humane way.

It was needed, he said, because the camels were damaging community water sources, getting stuck and dying in water holes and increasing grazing pressure during the drought.

He said they "appreciated the concerns of animal rights activists", but added there was "significant misinformation about the realities of life for non native feral animals, in what is one of the most arid and remote places on earth."

"As custodians of the land, we need to deal with an introduced pest, in a way that protects valuable water supplies for communities, and puts the lives of everyone, including young children, the elderly and native flora and fauna first," he said.

South Australia's Department for Environment and Water said previously local traditional land owners mustered and sold camels, but they now have too many to cope with.

There are estimated to be more than a million wild camels roaming Australia's desert, according to Australian Government backed Feral Scan website.

Around 2,300 people live in the ABY area.

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