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Australia Victoria's native wildlife at risk of starving to death unless government drops food, vets say

06:35  18 january  2020
06:35  18 january  2020 Source:   abc.net.au

Cadbury promises to donate proceeds from Caramello Koala and Freddo sales to help animals affected by Australia's devastating bushfires

  Cadbury promises to donate proceeds from Caramello Koala and Freddo sales to help animals affected by Australia's devastating bushfires Cadbury have pledged to donate the profits from their Caramello Koala, Freddo Frog, and Furry Friends chocolates to help Australia's bushfire affected wildlife.Cadbury have pledged to donate the profits from their Caramello Koala, Freddo Frog, and Furry Friends chocolates to help Australia's bushfire affected wildlife.

Wildlife Victoria is funded mainly by generous donations from individual donors. We also receive support from businesses, philanthropic trusts and foundations, bequests, and project grants. In 2019 the Victorian State government announced that it would make a contribution in 2019/2020 towards the

He said unless emergency measures were taken, 200 children would die every day over the next According to UN classifications, these people are at the fifth and worst stage of food insecurity. The child’ s mother, Hauwa Nana, 35, said one of her five children had starved to death since they fled to

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The Australian Veterinary Association is desperately calling on the Victorian Government to airdrop food into inaccessible, bushfire-affected land in Victoria to save starving wildlife.

The association's state president and wildlife vet David Middleton said native animals were beginning to starve "on a large scale" and that strategic fodder drops in targeted areas were necessary to avoid large-scale deaths over the coming weeks.

Wildlife habitat struggle in wake of fires

  Wildlife habitat struggle in wake of fires Wildlife carers say that a lack of suitable habitats makes it difficult to release native animals that survived recent bushfires and drought.A lack of food and habitats for native animals is concerning wildlife authorities across Australia's bushfire-ravaged southeast.

Government secretly killed 686 KOALAS by lethal injection because 'overpopulation' put them at risk of starving to death - but why couldn't they have been moved? Hundreds of koalas have been killed in secret by wildlife officials in Victoria due to concerns over starvation in a key habitat.

Food prices in some parts of the country have doubled in just a few days, and the non- governmental organisation said families faced impossible choices A total of 5.2 million children across Yemen are now at risk of starvation, according to the Britain-based NGO. The World Food Programme last year

a squirrel standing on a wooden surface: Animals Australia say Victoria is facing an unprecedented threat to wildlife unless food is dropped. (Supplied: Animals Australia) © Provided by ABC NEWS Animals Australia say Victoria is facing an unprecedented threat to wildlife unless food is dropped. (Supplied: Animals Australia)

Animals Australia director Lyn White said some species in fire-affected areas were critically endangered such as the mountain pygmy-possum and brush-tailed rock-wallaby found in Gippsland.

The charity offered $100,000 to the Victorian Government last week to help purchase food, but said they received no response to the offer.

Ms White said according to Emergency Management Victoria, about 1.35 million hectares had been burnt – most of it home to wildlife.

wildlife © ABC wildlife

"This is an unprecedented situation which requires unique and innovative solutions," she said.

Blue Mountains unique environment and wildlife may 'never recover', expert warns

  Blue Mountains unique environment and wildlife may 'never recover', expert warns As the mega-fire continues to burn in the World Heritage Blue Mountains near Sydney, some of the region's unique plants and animals may have been "completely wiped out".Local plant and animal rescue groups have been swinging into action to help with recovery, but one expert has warned that the environment may "never recover".

Habitat loss is seen as the primary threat to at - risk species but recovery plans avoid addressing it and governments have entrenched the extinction process.

Eating a moderate amount of carbohydrates best for healthy lifespan, say researchers.

Ms White said crews from Animals Australia were able to land in Mallacoota and distribute food on foot and by car, but they were unable to land in most other fire-affected areas throughout the Gippsland and Alpine region.

"Parks Victoria have the knowledge of where watering holes are which is where any surviving wildlife would be congregating, enabling targeted aerial food drops," she said.

But according to DELWP guidelines on its website, feeding wildlife is not recommended because it can make wildlife dependent on people for food, stop them dispersing away from fire-affected areas, create weed problems from unsterilised feed, attract predators and pests, and could favour aggressive species, disadvantaging more threatened species.

Last week, thousands of kilograms of carrots and sweet potatoes were dropped out of helicopters into valleys and national parks in NSW to feed endangered brush-tailed rock-wallabies.

Cuddles the koala not ready to return to life in the bush

  Cuddles the koala not ready to return to life in the bush A koala named Cuddles, who was rescued in Mallacoota, Victoria, has taken a surprising liking to those who found him.Jack Bruce was visiting family when devastating bushfires swept through the town on New Year's Eve.

Wildlife could be at risk from an imminent ban on pesticides linked to bee deaths , farmers and beekeepers have warned. said he did not think the alternative pesticides were necessarily more dangerous to bees than neonicotinoids, but said an increase in pyrethroids could pose risks of its own.

Starvation is a symptom of a larger problem involving land, health, power and ecological damage, say experts.

Victorian Opposition environment spokesman David Morris said aerial food drops for fire-affected wildlife was "a matter of priority".

"Aerial food drops began over a week ago in New South Wales; it's time that the Andrews Labor Government acts to ensure animals aren't forced to starve to death," Mr Morris said.

State Environment Minister Lily D'Ambrosio has been contacted for comment.

wildlife © ABC wildlife

Pictures: Australia’s most deadly and destructive bushfires

a red fire engine is parked in the grass: Wildfires have ravaged the Australian landscape since time immemorial, and while these blazes can be a natural part of the nation's ecology, they often result in devastating loss of life and serious injuries, as well as damage to property and swathes of farmland. Worryingly, experts warn that climate change is turning parts of the country into a tinderbox, exacerbating bushfire risk. As multiple infernos rage through the east coast, we take a look back in time at the most catastrophic conflagrations ever.

At Microsoft News Australia we've partnered with the giving platform Benevity to raise funds for Australian Red Cross, St Vincent De Paul Society and The Salvation Army; these organisations are helping communities across the country devastated by bushfires. You can help these organisations by donating here and for the latest news plus RFS and CFS links visit Bushfire emergency.

RSPCA calls for Kangaroo Island volunteers amid fears of 'second wave of mass wildlife deaths' .
Up to 120 volunteers are urgently needed on Kangaroo Island to help feed animals that have survived the devastating bushfires, RSPCA South Australia says. © ABC News The RSPCA fears a second wave of deaths is imminent due to starvation. Tens of thousands of animals, including up to 30,000 koalas, have died in the bushfires which have blackened almost half of the island.The RSPCA fears the surviving wildlife will succumb to starvation without an urgent response, describing the situation as a looming "second wave of mass wildlife deaths".

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