•   
  •   

Australia Indigenous youth in remote Australia share their ideas on #changethedate

22:15  25 january  2020
22:15  25 january  2020 Source:   abc.net.au

Christians BANNED! Western Australian community takes radical step to stop God botherers from trying to convert them to Christianity

  Christians BANNED! Western Australian community takes radical step to stop God botherers from trying to convert them to Christianity Aboriginal elders in a remote Western Australian community want to ban Christians from visiting their region to try and convert them to Christianity.The indigenous community said the religious organisation was attempting to convert them to Christianity and away from their traditional culture.

Video provided by Mamamia

As rallies encouraging Australians to #changethedate and #paytherent attract crowds across major cities, the situation in Western Australia's far north will be markedly different.

While January 26 continues to maintain government and some community support as our national holiday, the debate around a potential shift in the date continues to gain momentum.

a group of people walking on a sidewalk: Aboriginal people march outside Parliament House in Melbourne during an Invasion Day rally in 2016. (ABC News: Margaret Burin) © Provided by ABC NEWS Aboriginal people march outside Parliament House in Melbourne during an Invasion Day rally in 2016. (ABC News: Margaret Burin) But in the Kimberley, where the Indigenous population sits at close to 42 per cent and residents are at the front line of social issues confronting First Nations communities, the campaign is virtually absent from public debate.

Cult 'anointed by God' kills 7 in Panama Jungle

  Cult 'anointed by God' kills 7 in Panama Jungle Bibles rest on a wooden altar next to percussion instruments — a guiro and a drum — in the room where a religious sect allegedly forced a pregnant woman and five of her children to walk through fire in this remote hamlet. WARNING: The following story may be distressing to some readers.

Traditional owners will feature heavily in today's community events and citizenship ceremonies, but there are no rallies, marches, or concerts planned for the region's major towns.

Locals said it came down to people being focused on more immediate issues.

'It hasn't really been one of my priorities'

Bart Pigram has a long line of family history in the West Kimberley. © ABC Kimberley Bart Pigram has a long line of family history in the West Kimberley. Bart Pigram, a Yawuru man born and raised in Broome, has a long line of family history in the area.

He believes changing the date will be good for everybody, but said people in the Kimberley were more inclined to worry about more pressing issues.

"Changing the date for the Kimberley people won't change the suicide rates, it won't affect our drug and alcohol problem up here, we have other priorities at hand," he said.

Indigenous groups plot closing gap goals

  Indigenous groups plot closing gap goals Peak indigenous groups are meeting with the prime minister in Canberra on Thursday, to continue work on a new agreement on closing the wellbeing gap. Peak indigenous groups are meeting with the prime minister in Canberra in a bid to finalise a new agreement on Closing the Gap.Thursday's meeting comes ahead of the next Council of Australian Governments meeting in March, when the new agreement is expected to be given the stamp of approval. require(["inlineoutstreamAd", "c.

"We won't even be able to change the date if our living rates keep going the way they are.

"These other life and death issues in our community are more important to me."

The Kimberley region has one of the highest suicide rates in the world, with young Indigenous men making up 71 per cent of suicide victims over the last decade.

In 2017 an inquest was held regarding 13 suicides between 2012 and 2016, five of those children between 10 and 13 years of age.

In coroner Ros Fogliani's opening address, she said they had all been exposed to alcohol abuse and domestic violence in their homes, had poor school attendance, and most had not received any sort of mental health assessment or support.

While he was supportive of the rallies, Mr Pigram believes more effective ways of generating discussion around Australia's past are needed.

"It's great that protesters do it [but] there are also other strategic ways to do this — one of those is through the education system," he said.

'A dark day for Indigenous Australians': AFL superstar Nic Naitanui throws his support behind changing the date of Australia Day with a heartfelt message

  'A dark day for Indigenous Australians': AFL superstar Nic Naitanui throws his support behind changing the date of Australia Day with a heartfelt message West Coast Eagles ruckman Nic Naitanui took to Twitter on Thursday to weigh in on the debate around the date of Australia Day.West Coast Eagles ruckman Nic Naitanui took to Twitter on Thursday to share a lengthy post on his feelings around January 26.

"This is the whole problem: we're an uneducated nation, we are because our schools aren't teaching the true history of Australia.

"I learnt about pyramids when I was at school. What do I have to do with ancient Egypt? I should've been learning about ancient Australia."

'We are still oppressed'

Alicia Mclean Lulkbudia knows of the complex issues, but believes changing the date is a step in the right direction. © Alicia Mclean Lulkbudia Alicia Mclean Lulkbudia knows of the complex issues, but believes changing the date is a step in the right direction. Alicia Mclean is a Miriuwung and Gajerrong woman who goes by her traditional name of Lulkbudia.

Living in Perth but raised in Kununurra, 3,200km to the north, Ms Lulkbudia is able to see both worlds.

"I would say that we are still oppressed in our country," she said. 

"The incarceration rates, mental illness and how that affects our community, especially in the Kimberley region ... There are a lot of problems and they're very complex."

Ms Lulkbudia would prefer to abolish Australia Day altogether.

"It's just about acknowledging the history of Australia, and that this day is causing a lot of pain," she said.

"No day is appropriate to celebrate genocide, stolen generations, and all the horrific things that happened to Aboriginal people."

Young Australian of the Year finalists

  Young Australian of the Year finalists The state and territory finalists for the 2020 Young Australian of the Year.YOUNG AUSTRALIAN OF THE YEAR FINALISTS

Celebrating 'in a different way'

Ethan Taylor hopes we can make another day to celebrate the nation. © Supplied: Ethan Taylor Ethan Taylor hopes we can make another day to celebrate the nation. Warumungu man Ethan Taylor believes the same values celebrated on Australia Day could be celebrated on another day.

"I wish I could celebrate with these people the beauty of this country, the magic that lies on this land, not just on a different day, but in a different way," Mr Taylor said.

"For me no matter what day you celebrate, it won't do justice for as long as it's celebrated the way it is."

Originally from Geraldton in WA's mid-west, Mr Taylor said the things that make Australia great could easily be celebrated on a different date.

'The values that I see celebrated on Australia Day are not bad values — mateship, coming together, sharing a drink — that's not what's bad,' Mr Taylor said.

"When it's done under [the guise of] celebrating a nation that has committed atrocious acts to certain people, that's when it becomes bad."

With many people voicing different Australia Day suggestions, or a new day to celebrate entirely, Mr Pigram said the past could not be ignored.

"The date that Australia became Australia and [was] federated as one whole country was the first of January 1901; that is the true Australia Day," he said.

"We can't deny the past; that happened, that's history."

Australia Day celebrations divide public

  Australia Day celebrations divide public Australia Day celebrations should remain on January 26 as it marks a significant day for many across the nation, an exclusive reader survey has found.The survey, of 1114 participants*, revealed 49 per cent felt strongly about the date, claiming it is very important to them.

Pictures: 43 incredible facts about Australia you may not believe are true

a sunset over a body of water: Australia Day celebrations this year will take a decidedly solemn turn as residents around the country reflect on the devastating bushfires that have stunned the nation and the world. Each year, Australia Day commemorates the arrival of the first fleet of British ships and the raising of the flag of Great Britain at Sydney Cove in 1788. The celebrations are typically a balance between festive, commemorative and respectful, but at many celebrations this year, fireworks shows will be scrapped and more reflection will be on tap.In Sydney, for example, firefighters will take center stage. An expected 50 firefighters and their families will join New South Wales Governor Margaret Beazley on board the HMAS Canberra for a 21-gun military salute in Sydney Harbour.

Chris Hemsworth speaks out about Australia Day: 'Change the date' .
Chris Hemsworth has spoken out about the controversy surrounding Australia Day, calling for the date to be changed. The Aussie actor, 36, voiced his concern on Instagram, telling his almost 40 million followers of the "pain, sorrow and deep loss" that January 26 represents for our First Nations people.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

usr: 0
This is interesting!