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Australia Coronavirus CORVID-19's hit to Queensland economy prompts $27 million aid package

05:40  18 february  2020
05:40  18 february  2020 Source:   abc.net.au

Coronavirus evacuation flight from Wuhan lands in Darwin

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An ongoing outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID- 19 ) caused by SARS-CoV-2 started in December 2019. It was first identified in Wuhan, capital of Hubei province in China

Novel Coronavirus counter with historical data, info, daily charts, graphs, news and updates. Confirmed Cases and Deaths by Country and Territory. The novel coronavirus (COVID- 19 ) is affecting 29 countries and territories around the world.

Annastacia Palaszczuk smiling for the camera: Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk says Queensland has never treated coronavirus lightly. (ABC News)© Provided by ABC Business Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk says Queensland has never treated coronavirus lightly. (ABC News)

Likening Queensland's economic pain from the coronavirus outbreak to a natural disaster, Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk says the Government is rolling out a $27 million rescue package for the tourism, education and agriculture sectors.

Those three sectors alone are expected to lose hundreds of millions of dollars due to the closure of China's borders following the outbreak of the virus, which has recently been renamed CORVID-19.

Queensland tourism operators will have government fees and charges waived as part of the support package.

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As China now has placed over 400 million of its citizens under quarantine, China' s economy is grinding to a halt. Workers can't leave their homes. A MASSIVE hit to the global economy will directly result from the damage the coronavirus is currently doing. And it may get worse, a lot worse.

Taking a hit to your economy temporarily to slow down the spread both in your country and the world or keep people working and out in public and letting it spread significantly faster which will eventually catch up to their economy New virus? But there is a wuhan coronavirus on the loose already! / s .

"Our tourism, fishing and international education industries are hurting," Ms Palaszczuk said.

She said the devastating impact of coronavirus control measures were akin to "a disaster like any cyclone, fire or flood".

"This is the largest, most comprehensive coronavirus response by any government anywhere in Australia," she said.

China is Queensland's biggest trading partner and concerns have been expressed about the risk of massive job losses across the state due to the coronavirus outbreak.

Ms Palaszczuk said many industries had already been brought to a standstill.

"This Government has never treated this virus lightly," she said.

"We began preparing our defences while the first patients were still 7,000 kilometres away."

Video-conferencing company Zoom lifts the limit on its free version in China because so many people are using it amid the coronavirus outbreak .
Video-conferencing software company Zoom announced it would be lifting the 40-minute limit on video calls for its free version inside China as the country continues to grapple with the novel coronavirus, CEO Eric Yuan wrote in a blog post Wednesday. Virtual conferencing technology has become increasingly important for businesses, schools, and health care operations during the outbreak because limiting in-person contact reduces the risks of spreading the disease. While the global economy suffers from the outbreak, Zoom shares and monthly user rates continue to rise. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

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