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Australia Drought remains 'diabolical' for most of NSW

00:55  19 february  2020
00:55  19 february  2020 Source:   smh.com.au

South East Queensland rain boosts dams but causes widespread flooding

  South East Queensland rain boosts dams but causes widespread flooding Hundreds of people call authorities for help as a weekend of heavy rain causes flooding and brings much needed supplies to depleted dams. The weather bureau says there's more on the way.The deluge provided some much-needed boosts to dams in the region, but the Bureau of Meteorology (BOM) said it wasn't drought breaking.

More than 99 per cent of the state remains in drought , despite record rainfall in Sydney which will see the desalination plant switched off and water restrictions As Sydney recovers from the worst drought on record, the situation is still " diabolical " for most of the state, in what is likely to create tensions in

DROUGHT -RAVAGED regions across NSW have been granted temporary relief after much -needed Audio special: the ‘ Diabolical ’ drought . It also gave Ms Hicks’ granddaughters Shaleea and Sierra Scone won’t get any more rain until Friday, while Dubbo and Bourke will remain dry this week.

a herd of sheep standing on top of a dirt field: More than 99 per cent of NSW remains in drought despite the heavy rainfall in Sydney.© Nick Moir More than 99 per cent of NSW remains in drought despite the heavy rainfall in Sydney. More than 99 per cent of the state remains in drought, despite record rainfall in Sydney which will see the desalination plant switched off next month and water restrictions wound back.

As Sydney recovers from the worst drought on record, the situation is still "diabolical" for most of the state, in what is likely to create tensions in the Coalition ahead of the May budget.

Data presented to the government this week shows 99.4 per cent of NSW is still in drought, with about one-third in the highest category - "intense drought".

Littleproud says Nationals 'united' after Joyce challenge, before Llew O'Brien's exit

  Littleproud says Nationals 'united' after Joyce challenge, before Llew O'Brien's exit The National Party is together as one, according to Deputy Leader David Littleproud, despite a failed leadership challenge from Barnaby Joyce in the first sitting week of parliament. The Agriculture Minister's comments follow reports that some backbenchers have been threatening to cross the floor on controversial legislation, but were made before Queensland MP Llew O'Brien quit the Nationals.Mr Littleproud, who has recently been reappointed to Cabinet, said late last week that the Nationals "have a different psychology to everyone else.""We are united," Mr Littleproud said.

“This drought is relentless, but that shouldn’t mean students whose families choose to stay in the regions should have the “That’s why the NSW Government will continue to assess individual schools’ circumstances into the future to Visit the Department of Education website for more information.

Many individual storages remain extremely low, including Keepit and Split Rock in the Namoi valley Soil moisture for January was below to very much below average for much of New South Wales Drought is not simply low rainfall; if it was, much of inland Australia would be in almost perpetual

At the same time, water restrictions in Sydney will be eased back to level 1 from March 1 and the desalination plant is expected to be switched off on March 27.

A spokesman for the plant said: "Under the rules of the 2017 Metropolitan Water Plan, the plant is scheduled to cease producing water once Sydney’s dam levels reach 70 per cent capacity, subject to a minimum operating period of 14 months from the restart date."

Sydney's dam levels are now over 80 per cent full, double the level before the recent rains.

The data reveals only greater Sydney is showing signs of "positive recovery" and some of the driest areas in NSW only received sporadic rainfall that will have little impact on the drought.

Nationals leader and Deputy Premier John Barilaro said there was "no place for complacency" while parts of NSW remained "bone dry".

Has there been enough rain to end the drought?

  Has there been enough rain to end the drought? Torrential rain over the last week has brought fields of green, but sadly many have missed out too.The significant weather system that brought torrential rain to parts of New South Wales and Queensland has led to euphoria for some and disappointment for others who have missed out again.

Droughts take place whenever there is prolonged periods of rainfall deficiency for a season or more and usually when there is a lack of anticipated rainfall or precipitation. Social implications are possibly the most felt effects of drought . They are the direct effects to people and communities.

Read more . Some regions of western NSW have experienced their driest 16 months on record, according to the Bureau of Meteorology, and Joyce’s electorate of New England is one of the areas worst affected by the drought . He criticised the ABC’s decision to host Q&A’s drought discussion in

"I look forward to the day when we can finally say that the drought has broken but that day is not today and unfortunately it won’t be tomorrow or the next day," he said.

"It would be a shameful act for anyone to walk away from our farmers now and I refuse to go anywhere at the first sight of rainfall."

Agriculture Minister Adam Marshall said he was concerned Sydneysiders would forget about the plight of farmers.

"Sydney dams may be full and overflowing, and water restrictions might be easing, but our farmers are still facing the worst drought on record," he said.

"Conditions remain diabolical and it’s going to be a long hard slog before we see the drought break."

Mr Marshall said the Department of Primary Industries used three indices to measure drought - rainfall, plant growth and soil water. All measures remained "perilously low", he said.

According to predictions presented to the government, the cropping sector will need at least two fully yielding crops, which will take more than 18 months, to recover.

Meat and Livestock Australia is also predicting that it will take five years for herds to recover, while horticulturalists will face a recovery time of five to seven years.

Mr Marshall said it would take years for regional and rural NSW to recover.

"Some of our producers won’t see full recovery for at least five years. We owe it to our farmers to continue to stand by them through these times," he said.

Has the drought finally broken for some Aussie farmers? .
For some lucky farmers the past month has brought about a dramatic transformation on their properties, with once empty dust bowls suddenly becoming swathed in a sea of green. Others have been left to deal with the heartbreak of missing out on the rains yet again, as patchy summer downpours pass them by.Sheep and cattle farmer Cherilyn Lowe, who owns five properties and leases another two in Moonbi, near Tamworth in northern NSW, is one of the fortunate ones, having received about 280ml of rain since the beginning of the year."The way that the country looks now, it's so green, it just looks amazing.

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