•   
  •   

Australia Health Minister 'deeply sorry' for Blackwater scare but has no regrets

04:55  02 june  2020
04:55  02 june  2020 Source:   brisbanetimes.com.au

'Do I have breast cancer?' Radio host Jackie 'O' Henderson reveals her terrifying health scare

  'Do I have breast cancer?' Radio host Jackie 'O' Henderson reveals her terrifying health scare The radio host, 45, said on Thursday she'd previously had an ultrasound on her breast, which left her convinced she had cancerThe mother-of-one, 45, said on Thursday she'd previously had an ultrasound on her breast, which left her convinced she had the disease.

Care minister Caroline Dinenage told the House of Commons she was " deeply sorry that this has happened". BBC health correspondent Nick Triggle said one of the questions being asked today is why it took a BBC Panorama programme to expose this, and why the authorities did not spot what

“We deeply regret what happened and the suffering caused,” he wrote, echoing comments by the prime minister Theresa May in parliament on Wednesday when she too stopped short of apologising. “We deeply regret what happened and the suffering caused,” May said.

A supplied image obtained on Friday, May 29, 2020, of Queensland man Nathan Turner © AAP Image/Supplied A supplied image obtained on Friday, May 29, 2020, of Queensland man Nathan Turner Queensland's Deputy Premier has apologised to the family of a central Queensland man who was believed to have been the country's youngest COVID-19 victim, after a coroner found he did not have the virus.

Nathan Turner, 30, was found dead at his Blackwater home last week and a post-mortem test returned positive to COVID-19.

His death sparked a massive health response, with fever clinics set up and public experts flown in from Brisbane.

Authorities had been left baffled as to how Mr Turner could have contracted the virus given he had not left the small coal mining town, which had never recorded a case of coronavirus, for months.

More coronavirus restrictions set to be eased for Queenslanders

  More coronavirus restrictions set to be eased for Queenslanders The Queensland Government gave itself until today to decide which restrictions will be eased next and one Government Minister has indicated there's good news to come."The Premier will have more to say about that … I would tune in … the Premier's press conferences are always very important," Shannon Fentiman said.

Deputy Premier and Health Minister Steven Miles says a formal investigation would get to the bottom of critical questions, such as why the nurse didn't reveal she had travelled to Kuala Lumpur in March. "It appears to be incredibly unlikely that somebody wasn't asked if they had travelled overseas when that

Scotland's first minister says she is " deeply sorry " for the situation, but stands by her decision-making. Nicola Sturgeon has defended her response to revelations that Scotland's chief medical officer had twice breached coronavirus lockdown rules.

Steven Miles, who is also the state's health minister, personally apologised to Mr Turner's family and friends after multiple tests on the man's lungs and airways had found no traces of the virus.

"I know it's been incredibly distressing for them and to have to grieve under these circumstances, under this level of scrutiny, in some cases in quarantine, has only compounded that tragedy and their grief and to them I am so deeply sorry," he said.

"Our ability to control this virus requires us to respond rapidly to every single positive test; we have to treat every positive test as though it is a positive case."

Mr Miles said while he was sorry for adding to the family's grief, he would not have done anything differently.

"I think we have to respond rapidly to every positive case and that is precisely what happened here," he said.

Queensland MP referred to corruption watchdog over leak allegation

  Queensland MP referred to corruption watchdog over leak allegation A Queensland government MP has been referred to the state's corruption watchdog for allegedly leaking information a Rockhampton nurse gave to coronavirus contact tracers. A union, representing the nurse at the centre of central Queensland nursing home coronavirus scare last month, has referred Keppel Labor MP Brittany Lauga to the Crime and Corruption Commission. Nurses' Professional Association of Queensland spokesman Jack McGuire alleges information the nurse gave to contact tracers was passed on to Ms Lauga, which was then leaked to the media.

Improving health in WA. Health for Our performance.

Everyone has regrets in life, but how you move on from your past unfavorable choices can make a big difference in your life. Being able to take ownership of your mistakes will ensure you learn important lessons that will prevent you from repeating those same mistakes again.

"As you can see, I am upset that this has caused distress to this man's partner and his family but I think, given that we had that positive test, it was largely unavoidable."

Queensland's chief health officer Dr Jeannette Young said it may never be known whether Mr Turner ever had the virus.

The most sensitive and accurate test, conducted a few hours after his death, returned a positive and although up to a dozen subsequent tests returned negative, these were less reliable.

"Unfortunately I don't think we will ever know the answer to that question. There are two potential answers here: one is that it was a false positive, the other is that it was a true positive, and we won't know which it was," Dr Young said.

"But I am confident about the actions that were taken on that night to protect the community of Blackwater.

"I don't believe there was any more that could have been done that night.

Canberra Hospital's Adult Mental Health Unit admits about a dozen children each year

  Canberra Hospital's Adult Mental Health Unit admits about a dozen children each year About a dozen adolescents, some as young as 14, are admitted to the Adult Mental Health Unit each year, and advocates are '"deeply concerned" for their recovery and safety.The ACT has no facility for underaged mental health patients, so those who require admission often end up in the Adult Mental Health Unit (AMHU) at Canberra Hospital.

The mask boom has prompted sellers to jack up prices and exploit demand. This has meant a shortage for medics Italian authorities are now scrambling to respond to the outbreak, after the prime minister was Mask shortages mean fewer available for health workers. Health care workers who treat novel

Yes, countries with single-payer systems still have coronavirus cases, Italy and Japan. But the spread of the virus in those countries would likely pale in comparison to the potential spread of coronavirus in the US, in which a significant portion of the population simply won’t go to the doctor if they’re sick.

"I had a positive test result in the context of a gentleman who had a four-week history of flu-like illness."

Dr Young said while it was extremely rare" to get a false positive, "extremely rare things happen".

"There is always going to be a problem collecting a specimen post-mortem - that's always going to be difficult," she said.

Dr Young also praised the "tremendous response" of residents - 605 of whom had come forward for testing and returned negative results.

Click here for up-to-date coverage of the COVID-19 crisis on the Microsoft News app — available on Windows 10, iOS and Android

Subašić: “There are people who don't even know how long I've been wearing the ASM shirt” .
© Supplied by Sofoot Big gloved punch. In an interview with Monaco Morning , the now ex-goalkeeper of AS Monaco, Danijel Subašić , returned to his journey on the Rock by commenting in particular on the news of his former club. The Croatian doorman initially pointed out with bitterness the instability of the Principality club, victim of an all-too-frequent renewal according to him: " I think it has become a problem. Every six months, things move, the sport directors, the players.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks
usr: 0
This is interesting!