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Australia Family of Chinese student pay a $213,000 ransom

05:00  21 september  2020
05:00  21 september  2020 Source:   dailymail.co.uk

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A Chinese student victim of a bizarre virtual kidnapping where a man posing as a police officer extorted her family out of $ 213 , 000 has been found safe and well. The man in the video claimed to be from the Chinese police and demanded her family pay a ransom in exchange for her safe release.

A Chinese international high school student who was the victim of a "virtual kidnapping" scam has been found safe and well after her family paid more than 0, 000 in ransom . Key points: The woman spent several days with a Chinese university student who believed he was hiding a protected witness.

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A Chinese student victim of a bizarre virtual kidnapping where a man posing as a police officer extorted her family out of $213,000 has been found safe and well.

The 18-year-old, who lives in Sydney, was reported missing by worried friends just before 2am on September 8.

Photos and videos of the student being held at an unknown location were sent to her family over the Chinese messaging app WeChat.

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A 20-year-old Chinese student in Australia was returned to his parents after the family paid his kidnappers 80 bitcoin (2,320). Ye Jingwang was rescued and returned safely to his family , who arrived in Sydney, Australia on September 1, according to Southern Metropolis Daily via Shanghaiist.

Students are typically telephoned by a Mandarin speaker who purports to be someone holding authority in China such as an embassy, police or They are told they risk deportation or arrest unless their families pay a ransom . The students send images of themselves bound and gagged, move

The man in the video claimed to be from the Chinese police and demanded her family pay a ransom in exchange for her safe release.

a person standing in a room: Photos and videos of the student being held at an unknown location (pictured) were sent to her family over the Chinese-owned messaging app WeChat © Provided by Daily Mail Photos and videos of the student being held at an unknown location (pictured) were sent to her family over the Chinese-owned messaging app WeChat

Another person could be seen in the room with her in one of the images.

According to NSW Police, the scam started in July when the teenager got an email from people claiming to be Chinese authorities.

The fraudsters said her details had been illegally used on a package that was intercepted overseas.

After the woman was reported missing a strike force was launched with special investigators from the NSW State Crime Command, along with local detectives, to find the missing woman.

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Twenty-year-old Chinese student Xie is safe and sound after being kidnapped and held for a ransom of 80 bitcoin in Australia in late August. One family member said that the kidnapper used a taser to shoot the young college student , tying Ye’s hands and feet and keeping him in the back of a car for

After the ransom was paid , the kidnappers released the boy in a nearby village. A relative of the nine-year-old, Maxwell Buabeng Hazel recounted the family ’s “The person was like he has kidnapped the guy and is requesting an amount of GHc 5, 000 from the mother before they released the son to them.”

On Tuesday, less than a week later, she was found safe and well in Pyrmont, near Sydney CBD.

Police then established a crime scene at an apartment in Chatswood in the city's north where they spoke with a 22-year-old man.

a blurry image of a man: The man in the video (pictured) claimed to be from the Chinese police and demanded her family pay a ransom in exchange for her safe release © Provided by Daily Mail The man in the video (pictured) claimed to be from the Chinese police and demanded her family pay a ransom in exchange for her safe release

The woman believed the scammers were following orders from Chinese police and agreed not to contact her friends and family while she hid in an apartment, The Daily Telegraph reported.

Police confirmed that more than $213,000 had been transferred into an offshore account since July.

Less than two months ago NSW police warned the community about virtual kidnapping scams targeting Chinese students studying in Australia.

a person standing in a room: Police confirmed that more than $213,000 had been transferred into an offshore account since July. Pictured: The woman who was 'kidnapped' © Provided by Daily Mail Police confirmed that more than $213,000 had been transferred into an offshore account since July. Pictured: The woman who was 'kidnapped'

'It appears these scammers are continuing to operate and are once again preying on the vulnerabilities of individuals in the community who are not in direct physical contact with their families,' he said.

'The individuals behind these "virtual kidnapping" scams continually adapt their scripts and methodology which are designed to take advantage of people's trust in authorities.'

Officers have been assured by the Chinese Consulate-General in Sydney that no one claiming to be from a Chinese authority will contact a student via phone and demand money.

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