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Australia Australia to be hit by more mosquitoes and cyclones

16:00  25 november  2020
16:00  25 november  2020 Source:   dailymail.co.uk

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Bureau of Meteorology has confirmed that La Niña has formed in the tropical Pacific, with climate models suggesting it's likely to remain until at least the end of 2020. La Niña is a change in Pacific Ocean temperatures that affects global weather.

This is a list of cyclones that have significantly affected or made landfall over the coast of Western Australia . Lists of tropical cyclones . Notes. General. Specific. Hanstrum, Barry. A history of tropical cyclones in the Southwest of Western Australia , 1830-1992. Early days, Vol. 10, pt.

a person lying on a beach: MailOnline logo © Provided by Daily Mail MailOnline logo

Australians have been warned to be on the lookout for mosquitoes as a long, hot and wet summer creates the perfect breeding conditions for the insect.

Conditions could be about to get hotter and wetter in the north of the country after a La Niña formed in the tropical Pacific, with experts predicting it will bring heavy rainfall, and flash flooding.

The devastating weather phenomenon is expected to grip Australia until at least February 2021, according to the Bureau of Meteorology.

a insect on the ground: Experts have warned that wetter conditions and increased humidity could bring more mosquitoes to the Sunshine State (stock) © Provided by Daily Mail Experts have warned that wetter conditions and increased humidity could bring more mosquitoes to the Sunshine State (stock)

These conditions are perfect for mosquitoes, which are likely to thrive in the coming months, and cyclone season.

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A powerful cyclone has hit northeast Australia , destroying homes, upending trees, cutting power lines and The cyclone gathered strength in just a few hours before making landfall mid-morning as a category More than 10% of Australia 's sugar crop was at risk from Marcia, an industry body warned.

BoM believes eastern Australia and parts of the north will experience more rain over the coming months. It could lead to more mosquitoes too. The Northern Territory could be hit with an earlier onset of monsoons while Queensland could see more cyclones bringing widespread flooding.

The hot weather is already setting in with Australia set to swelter through temperatures of up to 50C as a 4,500km band of extreme heat stretches across the country.

This has sparked fears that there could be an outbreak of mosquito-borne diseases such as the 'potentially fatal' Murray Valley encephalitis virus, as well as the Ross River virus.

There has been an increase in Ross River cases in south-east Queensland, with 2,128 cases recorded this year, compared to 935 in 2019.

The last time Australia experience a La Niña was in 2010 and 2011, when Queensland was battered by floods.

Cameron Webb, Clinical Associate Professor and Principal Hospital Scientist, University of Sydney, said in October similar weather patterns has sparked a mosquito population boom in the past.

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The 2019–20 Australian region cyclone season was a well below-average tropical cyclone season for the waters surrounding Australia between longitudes 90°E and 160°E. The season officially began on

Australians are bracing themselves for one of the worst cyclones to hit north-eastern Australia in decades. Thousands of residents have fled their homes and are hunkered down in temporary evacuation centres across the region. Queensland has already been hit by months of flooding and

'Mosquitoes lay their eggs on or around stagnant or still water. This could be water in ponds, backyard plant containers, clogged gutters, floodplains or wetlands,' he wrote for The Conversation.

'Mosquito larvae hatch and spend the next week or so in the water before emerging as adults and buzzing off to look for blood.

chart, line chart: The La Nina heatwave will continue until at least February next year with more rain expected over the coming months © Provided by Daily Mail The La Nina heatwave will continue until at least February next year with more rain expected over the coming months a person lying on a sandy beach: Dr Webb said an increase in mosquito numbers is likely to escalate the risk of the diseases they spread, especially the Ross River virus (pictured, sunbakers in Coogee) © Provided by Daily Mail Dr Webb said an increase in mosquito numbers is likely to escalate the risk of the diseases they spread, especially the Ross River virus (pictured, sunbakers in Coogee)

'If the water dries up, they die. But the more rain we get, the more opportunities for mosquitoes to multiply.'


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Tropical Cyclone Debbie has been downgraded to a category-three storm this afternoon, a few hours after it crossed the Queensland coast at 1pm AEST Cyclone Debbie, which is expected to diminish into a tropical low on Wednesday, is expected to track south-west but is still moving extremely slowly

Two powerful cyclones pounded Australia on Feb. "There are downed power lines. There are a number of trees down and many roads are impassable and we do Queensland has been smashed by several major storms and cyclones over the past few years with Cyclone Oswald, also a category

Dr Webb said an increase in mosquito numbers is likely to escalate the risk of the diseases they spread, especially the Ross River virus.

Victoria had an outbreak of the Rose River virus in the summer of 2016.

Entomologist Stephen Doggett told Seven News the best way to avoid mosquitoes is to avoid areas prone to them at dawn and dusk.

He also advised it is important to cover up and make sure you wear repellent that contains DEET, picaridin, or eucalyptus.

map: Inland regions will sweat through six straight days of temperatures above 40C. Pictured: weather map for Saturday at 5pm © Provided by Daily Mail Inland regions will sweat through six straight days of temperatures above 40C. Pictured: weather map for Saturday at 5pm

'Most importantly, read the label and see when you need to reapply it - because there are different reapplication rates for different products and different percentages of the chemical that's inside the repellent,' he said.

People are also advised to close their windows and doors, and use insecticide if found in the home.

Cyclones are also a weather pattern that can develop due to La Nina.

Forecasters warn that La Nina will dampen the state's bushfire season, but create a more intense storm and cyclone season this summer.

Queensland BOM forecast predicts more cyclones than usual this year due to La Niña warming Coral Sea

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The Bureau of Meteorology's Laura Boekel is expecting higher than average rainfall to cause higher than average flooding, and more than four cyclones to form in the Coral Sea.

a group of police officers riding on the back of a truck: Queenslanders were urged to draw up their own household emergency plans, pack emergency kits and check their insurance cover (pictured, flooding in Brisbane on October 27) © Provided by Daily Mail Queenslanders were urged to draw up their own household emergency plans, pack emergency kits and check their insurance cover (pictured, flooding in Brisbane on October 27) a person standing in front of a tree: Forecasters warn that La Nina will dampen the state's bushfire season (pictured, a blaze in Peregian Springs in September 2019) but create a more intense storm and cyclone season © Provided by Daily Mail Forecasters warn that La Nina will dampen the state's bushfire season (pictured, a blaze in Peregian Springs in September 2019) but create a more intense storm and cyclone season

'Even though the bushfire season is still ongoing and has affected parts of Queensland, it's a lot less severe than what we saw last year and we are expecting more flooding and more tropical cyclones this season,' she told reporters on Monday.

Ms Boekel said it was difficult to say which particular areas would experience the most intense rainfall.

Monsoon troughs and tropical lows would primarily affect the north, but she said any lows moving down the coast could bring flooding to the southeast.

'It's very difficult to say, and the message would be that all of Queensland should prepare for what the season could bring because there's no one area that is exempt from severe weather,' Ms Boekel said.

Cyclones, rain storms and flash flooding to batter Queensland

  Cyclones, rain storms and flash flooding to batter Queensland Forecasters warn that La Nina will dampen the state's bushfire season, but create a more intense storm and cyclone season this summer. The Bureau of Meteorology's Laura Boekel is expecting higher than average rainfall to cause higher than average flooding, and more than four cyclones to form in the Coral Sea.'Even though the bushfire season is still ongoing and has affected parts of Queensland, it's a lot less severe than what we saw last year and we are expecting more flooding and more tropical cyclones this season,' she told reporters on Monday.

The meteorologist said that typically one to two cyclones form the in Gulf of Carpentaria and about four form in the Coral Sea.

What is Ross River and Barmah Forest, Murray Valley encephalitis virus?

The Ross River and Barmah Forest viruses can spread by the bite of certain types of infected female mosquitoes.

Sometimes aspirin or paracetamol are enough to treat the virus but a doctor will advise the best form of treatment.

Murray Valley encephalitis virus (MVE) is a flavivirus spread by mosquitoes.

It can cause permanent neurological disease or death and was first found in Australia in Victoria in 1951.

It is very rare for humans to contract MVE.

Diagnosis of the above viruses must be reported to the Department of Health so they can keep track of infected areas.

The viruses can only be diagnosed through a blood test. There are no registered vaccinations to help prevent catching the virus.

Symptoms of the Ross River and Barmah illnesses can include:

Symptoms of MVE include fever, drowsiness, confusion, seizures and vomiting.

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