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Australia Australians banned from the PUB if they refuse coronavirus vaccine

02:58  20 february  2021
02:58  20 february  2021 Source:   dailymail.co.uk

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a couple of people that are sitting on a bench: MailOnline logo © Provided by Daily Mail MailOnline logo

Australians could be banned from entering restaurants, pubs and even shops if they fail to show proof of immunisation when the vaccine is rolled out on Monday.

Safe Work Australia said while it's unlikely companies will be forced to ask customers for proof of vaccination under current work health and safety laws, they are free to do so if they please.

The safety regulator recommended that businesses - including cafes, restaurants and bars - consider taking further precautionary action once the vaccine is administered.

a woman sitting at a desk in an office chair: Quarantine and border staff, aged care residents and frontline health staff will receive their first jab of the Pfizer vaccine on Monday (pictured: nurse simulates administering Covid-19 vaccine at vaccination hub in Camperdown) © Provided by Daily Mail Quarantine and border staff, aged care residents and frontline health staff will receive their first jab of the Pfizer vaccine on Monday (pictured: nurse simulates administering Covid-19 vaccine at vaccination hub in Camperdown) a group of people sitting at a table: Safe Work Australia recommends businesses to consider asking customers for proof of vaccination as an entry requirement (pictured: revellers at the Coogee Bay Hotel) © Provided by Daily Mail Safe Work Australia recommends businesses to consider asking customers for proof of vaccination as an entry requirement (pictured: revellers at the Coogee Bay Hotel)

'However, you might still want to require this as a condition of entry to your premises,' the advice said.

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'Before you take action to impose this kind of requirement, you should seek advice as there may be privacy and discrimination issues that apply.'

Safe Work also recommends that employers can't force staff to get the jab, and workers aren't allowed to use their colleagues' inability to get vaccinated as an excuse to stay home.

But at-risk industries such as hotel quarantine and workplaces that care for groups vulnerable to the virus, may have a better chance to encourage vaccinations.

The advice from Safe Work recommends that businesses use pre-existing laws that allow companies to issue reasonable directions to staff.

Industrial Relations Minister Christian Porter said the Safe Work advice reinforced that vaccinations against Covid-19 should be voluntary.

Covid vaccines to be rolled out from MONDAY in NSW

  Covid vaccines to be rolled out from MONDAY in NSW Healthcare staff and those supporting New South Wales' hotel quarantine program will receive a Pfizer jab in the first stage of the state's vaccine rollout over the next three weeks.Healthcare staff and workers supporting the state's hotel quarantine program will get a Pfizer jab in the first stage of the state's vaccine rollout.

'The government expects that the overwhelming majority of Australians will want to be vaccinated to protect themselves and their loved ones, and so they can get on with their lives without disruption,' Mr Porter said.

a group of people sitting in front of a crowd: Safe Work Australia said it's unlikely companies will need to ask customers for proof of vaccination but recommends implementing additional measures (pictured: revellers at the Coogee Bay Hotel) © Provided by Daily Mail Safe Work Australia said it's unlikely companies will need to ask customers for proof of vaccination but recommends implementing additional measures (pictured: revellers at the Coogee Bay Hotel) a group of people wearing military uniforms © Provided by Daily Mail

A recent Australian Bureau of Statistics survey found that three out of four Australians said they would happily receive the COVID-19 vaccine.

The survey found men were more likely than women, at 76 per cent versus 71 per cent, to agree or strongly agree with getting a vaccine, as were people aged over 65 compared to those aged 18 to 64 (83 per cent versus 71 per cent).

But 12 per cent said they did not want to get a vaccine, due to concerns about potential side effects or how effective the vaccine would be.

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From Monday, quarantine and border staff, aged care residents and frontline health staff around the country will receive their first jab of the Pfizer vaccine as phase 1a of the Australia's vaccination program begins.

If you are in an at-risk group, you should contact your GP to ensure you receive the vaccine promptly.

a group of people around each other: A recent Australian Bureau of Statistics survey found that three out of four Australians said they would receive the COVID-19 vaccine (pictured: nurse simulates administering Covid-19 vaccine at vaccination hub in Camperdown) © Provided by Daily Mail A recent Australian Bureau of Statistics survey found that three out of four Australians said they would receive the COVID-19 vaccine (pictured: nurse simulates administering Covid-19 vaccine at vaccination hub in Camperdown)

Everything Aussies need to know about the vaccine roll out

* What about Australians under the age of 16?

The Pfizer vaccination approval does not cover people under the age of 16, but it has no upper age limit. The medical regulator says the benefits of the vaccination for people over the age of 85, or those who are frail, should be weighed against potential risk of even a mild response.

Age limits for the AstraZeneca vaccination will be outlined in the Therapeutic Goods Administration's approval.

Victoria administers first COVID-19 jab

  Victoria administers first COVID-19 jab Victoria has given its first COVID-19 vaccine this morning, becoming the first state to officially begin the vaccination rollout. © Nine Monash Health's Professor Rhonda Stuart has become the first person in Victoria to receive the COVID-19 jab. Head of infection prevention at Monash Health, Professor Rhonda Stuart, was the first Victorian recipient of the Pfizer vaccine, getting the jab about 7.30am.About 100 healthcare workers are expected to be vaccinated in the first Monash Health clinic today.

* How many do we get?

Both vaccines are two doses - so Australians will get two at least 21 days apart. They will need to be from the same company.

* Where will they be administered?

General practitioners and pharmacies have put their hand up to be involved, and there's expected to be pop-up clinics at current COVID-19 testing centres and hospitals.

* How can Australians prove they've been vaccinated?

Jabs will be recorded on the Australian Immunisation Register. Certificates proving vaccinations will then be available either digitally or in hard copy. The government says this might be needed for interstate and overseas travel.

* How many vaccines has Australia ordered?

Australia has secured more than 150 million doses of various vaccines, including almost 54 million doses of the AstraZeneca vaccine, with the vast majority to be manufactured in Melbourne. As well as more than 51 million from Novavax.

WHICH VACCINES AUSTRALIA HAS SECURED:

Pfizer:

20 million doses - enough to vaccinate 10 million Australians

Novavax:

Australia has ordered 51 million doses but it is still in the trial phase

University of Oxford/AstraZeneca:

53.8 million doses

3.8 million doses to be delivered to Australia in early 2021

COVAX Facility

The Australian Government has joined the COVAX Facility as part of a global effort to support rapid, fair and equitable access to COVID-19 vaccines. This participation enables us to purchase vaccine doses for Australia as they become available

This includes the Moderna vaccine, CureVac, Inovio and others.

Australia has paid $123.2 million to allow the purchase of over 25,000,000 doses and paid $80 million to support vaccine access for

University of Queensland:

Australia had ordered 51 million doses. However, the deal has been scrapped after trial participants returned false positive results for HIV

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