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Australia Scott Morrison stands by AstraZeneca COVID vaccine rollout after blood clot concerns overseas

03:37  12 march  2021
03:37  12 march  2021 Source:   abc.net.au

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The AstraZeneca vaccine is prepared for administering at Region Hovedstaden's Vaccine Centre in Copenhagen, Denmark, Thursday Feb. The UK government has meanwhile urged people to "still go and get their COVID -19 vaccine ", stressing the suspension in multiple countries "is a precautionary measure". It comes after Austria suspended a batch of the vaccines following the death of a woman due to multiple blood clots and the hospitalisation of another person with a blockage in the arteries of the lungs.

rollout of the AstraZeneca -Oxford Covid -19 vaccine following reports of blood clots among a Denmark suspends AstraZeneca COVID shots for two weeks after blood clot reports (Reuters). European Healthcare Workers Are Refusing AstraZeneca Vaccine Over Efficacy Concerns (Forbes).

Scott Morrison wearing a suit and tie: Scott Morrison is standing by the government's vaccine rollout plans. (ABC News: Ian Cutmore) © Provided by ABC Health Scott Morrison is standing by the government's vaccine rollout plans. (ABC News: Ian Cutmore)

Scott Morrison says Australian health authorities have not raised any concerns about using the AstraZeneca coronavirus vaccine, after some European countries paused their rollouts amid reports of people developing blood clots after their injections.

The Prime Minister, who is also the acting Health Minister while Greg Hunt is on sick leave, said he had spoken to Health Department Secretary Brendan Murphy this morning, and there was no advice to pause Australia's rollout.

"The [Therapeutic Goods Administration] obviously looks at these reports when they come through, but they do their own batch testing," he said.

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He also said the reports of blood clots received so far “are not greater than the number that would have occurred naturally in the vaccinated population,” and he urged people to continue seeking inoculation. Meanwhile, Estonia, Lithuania, Luxembourg and Latvia have all suspended use of shots Denmark has given more than 142,000 inoculations with the AstraZeneca vaccine , accounting for about one-quarter of all Danes who have received a first Covid shot. A year ago, Denmark became one of the first EU nations to go into a lockdown and shut its borders, and it has stood out for its cautious

COPENHAGEN (Reuters) - Denmark has temporarily suspended AstraZeneca (NASDAQ:AZN) COVID -19 vaccine shots after reports of cases of blood clots forming, including one in Denmark, Danish authorities said on Thursday. They did not say how many reports of blood clots there had been, but Austria has stopped using a batch of AstraZeneca shots while investigating a death from coagulation disorders and an illness from a pulmonary embolism. They said six other European countries had halted the use of a vaccine batch from AstraZeneca .

"I was watching them do it just earlier this week.

"We have a very robust process for examining that."

Mr Morrison said Australian authorities would continue to monitor developments overseas.

Denmark, Norway and Iceland have suspended the use of the AstraZeneca vaccine, following reports that people who received it went on to form blood clots.

However the European medicine regulator EMA says the vaccine's benefits outweigh its risks and it should continue to be administered.

When asked if he was personally worried about the news from Denmark, Norway and Iceland, Mr Morrison said he was not.

Deputy Prime Minister Michael McCormack also wanted to assure Australians the vaccine remained safe to use.

"We're getting on with the vaccine, we're getting on with the rollout, and Australians should be assured our TGA — which is world class — they've said it's OK," he said.

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© Provided by The Independent. Denmark and Norway have temporarily paused their AstraZeneca coronavirus vaccine programmes after reports of cases of blood clots forming, including one death. The move was described by Danish officials as “precautionary” and there has been no confirmed link between the blood clots and the vaccine . Any possible complications would likely stem from a specific batch, rather than indicating a wider issue. Austria has also stopped using a batch of AstraZeneca doses while investigating a death from coagulation disorders and an illness from a pulmonary embolism.

Health regulators in Norway have put the use of AstraZeneca ’s Covid vaccine on hold and Italy has banned a batch of the jab as officials in Denmark and Austria investigate 1 fatality in each country among reported recipients. Norway’s Institute of Public Health made a similar move on Thursday by temporarily suspending the AstraZeneca rollout . The agency’s Director of Infection Prevention and Control, Geir Bukholm, told a press conference: “This is a cautionary decision.” “I would like to point out that the break does not mean that we do not recommend vaccination with AstraZeneca in the future

The AstraZeneca vaccine was approved for use in Australia last month. The majority of the doses will be produced onshore in Melbourne by biotech company CSL.

October deadline delay defended

Mr Morrison defended the slow rollout of the COVID-19 vaccine, but insisted all Australians would receive at least their first dose by October.

The Department of Health has blamed uncertainty around local production and international supply issues for putting vaccine rollout targets in doubt.

In January the government said it wanted to have 4 million vulnerable Australians vaccinated by early April.

So far only around 150,000 people have been vaccinated.

The Prime Minister said a decision by Italy and the European Union to block 250,000 AstraZeneca doses from being exported to Australia had taken its toll.

"That obviously has an impact on the amount of doses available in the early stages of the rollout," he said.

Early COVID-19 vaccine supplies 'a lot less than anticipated', PM concedes

  Early COVID-19 vaccine supplies 'a lot less than anticipated', PM concedes Prime Minister Scott Morrison has conceded that Australia's early COVID-19 vaccine supplies from overseas were "a lot less than we had anticipated" as he defended delays to the national rollout. Mr Morrison said Australia had originally expected to receive 3.8 million AstraZeneca doses from the European Union, but had so far received just 700,000."There are some 300,000 doses that are already out and being distributed from AstraZeneca, and there is another 400,000 that's about to go out," he said, speaking from a press conference at a western Sydney car dealership.

Prepared syringes of the AstraZeneca Covid -19 vaccine , March 5, 2021 © REUTERS / Benoit Tessier. The European Medicines Agency (EMA) said on Thursday that it was investigating after two people inoculated from the same batch of AstraZeneca Covid -19 vaccine died from blood clotting and several countries stopped using the jabs. The inquiry comes after Iceland, Norway, Denmark, Estonia, Lithuania, Luxembourg and Latvia all suspended their rollouts of the AstraZeneca vaccine over fears that they may induce blood clotting – known medically as "thromboembolic events."

Germany’s vaccine commission said AstraZeneca ’s COVID -19 vaccine should not be A fourth patient developed a pulmonary embolism, a condition in which a blockage forms in the lungs’ arteries, officials said. The European Medicines Agency said there was “currently no indication” that AstraZeneca ’s vaccine In all, 22 cases of blood clots had been reported as of Tuesday among the 3 million people who had received AstraZeneca ’s vaccine in the 29-nation European Economic Area, officials said. “The information available so far indicates that the number of thromboembolic events in

"We said many months ago ... that we would hope to get, in those early phases, to around 80,000 vaccinations a week.

"We are getting up to those levels now as we conclude our third week."

Mr Morrison said a change in the medical advice had also impacted the October deadline.

Experts changed their advice to say that vaccines should be given 12 weeks apart, not four weeks as originally planned.

"We were clear a month ago that the October deadline would not include the second dose," he said.

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Video: Pfizer/BioNTech say data suggests vaccine 94% effective in preventing asymptomatic infection (Reuters)

Australian experts back AstraZeneca vaccine, despite European regulator not ruling out link to rare blood clots .
Australian experts back AstraZeneca vaccine, despite European regulator not ruling out link to rare blood clotsThe European Medicines Agency (EMA) found in its preliminary review that while the overall risk of clotting in people who've been vaccinated is on par with the general population, it could not rule out a potential link with a number of rare clots associated with low blood platelets.

usr: 1
This is interesting!