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Australia Qld govt says vaccine rollout can adapt

04:20  12 april  2021
04:20  12 april  2021 Source:   aap.com.au

Decision about AstraZeneca's use in Australia to be make this week

  Decision about AstraZeneca's use in Australia to be make this week An urgent investigation was launched into the potential side effects of the Covid-19 vaccine after a Melbourne man who received the jab was hospitalised with a rare blood clotting condition. Experts have been holding talks with European regulators to determine whether the 44-year-old's low blood platelets and 22 other similar cases in the UK are linked to the vaccine. The Australian Technical Advisory Group on Immunisation (ATAGI) will convene on Wednesday to weigh up the risks and benefits of AstraZeneca jabs once further information is provided from international discussions.

Maimin said collaboration between private and public sectors was key to ensure that the country’s COVID-19 vaccine rollout plan went smoothly. “The whole intention of NHI is that there’s no public or private care. I think this will be a wonderful example, it will set the scene for universal health coverage, no such thing as private or public health care.” South Africa is expected to receive vaccines from various suppliers but Maimin said this was nothing unusual and they would be well managed by nurses as seen during other programmes. Download the Eyewitness News app to your iOS or Android device.

While vaccine rollouts for some group across Canada have begun, there are still questions about how the remaining Canadians will know when it's their turn to be immunized. Smith says there are two components to setting a vaccine timeline _ determining which segment of the population should go next, and implementing ways to inform them when their turn is approaching. Some countries, like Britain, are going by age, inoculating the eldest members of society first and working backwards from there.

The Queensland government says any delay in its coronavirus vaccine rollout will be caused by federal supply issues rather than its own distribution efforts.

graphical user interface, text, application: Qld health officials are confident the rollout of Pfizer vaccine doses can adapt to new advice. © Albert Perez/AAP PHOTOS Qld health officials are confident the rollout of Pfizer vaccine doses can adapt to new advice.

The federal government has dumped its target of giving all Australians their first vaccine dose by the end of October after authorities recommended people under the age of 50 get the Pfizer vaccine instead of AstraZeneca jab because of blood clotting concerns.

Queensland Health Minister Yvette D'Ath says the state has already completed vaccinating about 125,000 people in the 1a cohort, which includes frontline healthcare and quarantine workers.

Young Australians' hopes for an overseas holiday could be dashed

  Young Australians' hopes for an overseas holiday could be dashed Australia had been aiming to open its international borders beyond New Zealand from the end of October when every citizen was expected to receive at least their first vaccine dose. But that timeline is now almost impossible to meet following Thursday's announcement the AstraZeneca Covid-19 vaccine - which Australia had purchased the most doses of - was no longer recommended for under 50s, only the Pfizer jab.

Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk said the AstraZeneca vaccine would continue to be administered in the Torres Strait due to the high rates of COVID-19 in nearby Papua New Guinea. CEO Brian Hewitt said increasing the supply of alternative vaccines was the Federal Government 's best option to maintain confidence in the rollout . "We're talking about a very, very rare possibility of a reaction to this vaccine – very rare compared to all other medicines and vaccines that are distributed," Mr Hewitt said .

The country said it would suspend the use of the shot in its vaccination program after a study, published Sunday and not yet peer reviewed, found that the vaccine offered "minimal protection" against mild to moderate disease caused by the mutation found in South Africa. Oxford University said "protection against moderate-severe disease, hospitalization or death could not be assessed in this study as the target population were at such low risk." Vaccine makers had already started developing second-generation Covid vaccines aimed at targeting new variants of the virus, and experts say it

The state is still vaccinating more than one million in the 1b cohort, which includes health care workers and critical and high risk workers such as defence, police, fire, emergency services and meat processing.

Ms D'Ath has previously promised that 1b would be fully vaccinated by mid-June, but she says supply issues could impact the target.

"We've said all along that our rollout is contingent on supply, so as long as that supply keeps coming we will keep vaccinating Queenslanders," she told reporters.

"We've already done our 1a group, we're in the stage of doing 1b, we will keep doing 1b as quickly as we possibly can subject to supply."


Video: TGA to advise the Govt on future of AstraZeneca (ABC NEWS)

The health minister was confident that state's vaccine rollout can adapt to the new advice even though the Queensland currently has only six Pfizer vaccine hubs in operation.

Urgent AstraZeneca Covid vaccine probe lauched after man hospitalised

  Urgent AstraZeneca Covid vaccine probe lauched after man hospitalised Australia's medicines regulator has begun an urgent investigation into the AstraZeneca Covid vaccine after a man was hositalised with a rare blood clotting condition. The Therapeutic Goods ­Administration held talks with British regulators overnight probing whether the 44-year-old's low blood platelets and 22 other similar cases in the UK are linked to the vaccine.Discussions will continue on Saturday between the Australian Health Protection Principal Committee and the Australian Technical Advisory Group on Immunisation.

The rollout of the COVID-19 vaccine in Europe is "unacceptably slow" as the number of new cases across the region increased for the sixth consecutive week, the World Health Organization (WHO) European office warned on Thursday. "Only five weeks ago, the weekly number of new cases in Europe had dipped to under one million, but now the region's situation is more worrying than we have seen in several months," Dr Dorit Nitzan, Regional Emergency Director for Who Europe, said in a statement.

Australia will still wait until March to roll out a vaccine , but we'll be keeping a close eye on what transpires in the UK. Here's what we can learn. So far, Pfizer has reported no serious side effects, although vaccine recipients may experience temporary pain and flu-like reactions immediately after injections. Dr Short said it was "very unlikely" a major adverse event would occur in the UK's vaccine rollout , but possible, which is why researchers continue to monitor trial participants and watch for any issues in the general population for at least a couple of years.

She said the government was working out how to distribute Pfizer beyond the hubs and to train staff how to handle the vaccine.

"That's all possible, we're very confident we can do that, we can do it successfully, and we are already putting in place those processes," Ms D'Ath said.

Chief Health Officer Jeannette Young said the biggest issue was consistent supply rather than handling and administering the Pfizer vaccine.

She said health staff needed training in cold chain storage and diluting the Pfizer vaccine, which isn't required for the AstraZeneca jab.

"So it is a significantly different vaccine, which is not an issue, it just means people need training for it," Dr Young said.

Queensland reported one new case of COVID-19, who was already in hotel quarantine after arriving from Papua New Guinea, on Monday.

The state also added a historic case to the tally of the recent outbreak in southeast Queensland and northern NSW.

The woman had attended a hen's party in Byron Bay in March which was linked to the virus spreading to 13 people.

Australian man, 44, hospitalised with blood costs after Covid vaccine .
The 44-year-old got the jab on March 22 and later presented to a Melbourne hospital suffering fever and abdominal pain, and was found to have blood clots in his abdomen.The 44-year-old got the jab on March 22 and later presented to Box Hill Hospital in Melbourne suffering fever and abdominal pain.

usr: 1
This is interesting!