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Australia Queensland's coronavirus restrictions are set to ease on Thursday. What happens next?

02:07  14 april  2021
02:07  14 april  2021 Source:   abc.net.au

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a group of people walking down the street: Queensland's mask-wearing rules are expected to ease on Thursday. (ABC News: Lucas Hill) © Provided by ABC News Queensland's mask-wearing rules are expected to ease on Thursday. (ABC News: Lucas Hill)

Queensland's coronavirus restrictions will ease at midday on Thursday — providing no new cases emerge to re-ignite fears of community transmission.

State health officials are expected to confirm the details on Wednesday morning, but Chief Health Officer Jeannette Young said yesterday the state would likely revert to "where we were prior to these outbreaks."

So, what does that mean? Here's a reminder.

Do I need to wear a mask?

The shift back to previous advice means looser rules on wearing masks.

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It's likely there will be no legal requirement to wear masks indoors — including grocery shopping, on public transport, or in restaurants and pubs when not eating or drinking.

However, Queensland Health is likely to continue to encourage people to carry a mask and wear it wherever they cannot socially distance.

Masks will still need to be worn inside airports and on planes — that's an Australia-wide requirement.

Babies and children under 12 do not need to wear a mask, nor those with a physical condition or illness that makes wearing one unsuitable.

Can I visit an aged care home?

Visitors are likely to be allowed back into aged care homes, hospitals, disability support homes and detention centres.

However, they will still have to declare if they have been in a coronavirus hotspot, overseas, or have had contact with a confirmed case of COVID-19 during the previous 14 days.

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Temperature checks and social distancing will remain in place.

What about eating out?

From Thursday, it's likely people will once again be allowed to stand in bars and restaurants. Previously, patrons had to sit at a table to eat or drink.

Hospitality venues will still have to adhere to the one-person-per-two-square-metre rule.

Dancing will be allowed once again, but the two-square-metres-per-person rule will likely apply.

What about weddings and funerals?

It's likely the big ones — weddings and funerals — will again be allowed to host 200 guests, regardless of the size of the venue.

Up to 100 people will be allowed to gather at a private home.

The same rule is expected to apply to private gatherings at non-residences, like a community hall, for example, that does not have a COVID-safe plan.

In outdoor spaces, up to 500 people will be allowed to gather for events, like friends celebrating a birthday in a public park.

Larger events will require a COVID-safe plan, but the upper limit will not be capped.

Ticketed venues and open-air stadiums should be able to operate at 100 per cent capacity.

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