•   
  •   

Australia NSW plans to manufacture key technology used to make Covid-19 vaccines

12:41  04 may  2021
12:41  04 may  2021 Source:   dailymail.co.uk

India Is a Warning

  India Is a Warning The world’s largest vaccine producer is struggling to overcome its latest COVID-19 surge—and that’s everyone’s problem.What is taking place in India isn’t so much a wave as it is a wall: Charts showing the country’s infection rate and death toll, which has also reached record numbers in the country, depict curves that have shot up into vertical lines. Public-health experts aren’t optimistic that they will slope down anytime soon.

a person standing in a room: MailOnline logo © Provided by Daily Mail MailOnline logo

Australia's top scientists and politicians have teamed up to set up a manufacturing plant for mRNA vaccines like Pfizer and Moderna.

NSW Premier Gladys Berejiklian on Monday met with the state's chief scientist to discuss plans to build Australia's first RNA manufacturing facility.

The Pfizer and Moderna vaccines both use mRNA technology but Australia has no capacity to make the jabs itself, leaving the country dependent on overseas production.

Making mRNA vaccines took on more importance since Australia's plan to immunise the population with locally-made AstraZeneca vaccnine was scuttled by the jab's link to a fatal blood clot condition.

How deadly is India's Covid variant and is it REALLY behind crisis?

  How deadly is India's Covid variant and is it REALLY behind crisis? Doctors on the frontline have blamed the B.1.617 strain for the raging second wave that is killing nearly 3,000 Indians a day. But UK scientists have accused India of being too complacent.Doctors on the frontline claim the B.1.617 strain is responsible for the raging second wave which has sparked hundreds of thousands of new infections each day and left the country with a crippling shortage of oxygen and hospital beds.

Messenger mRNA vaccines teach cells how to make protein that triggers an immune response to a virus, rather than using an inactivated version of the disease.

a group of people standing in a room: ( © Provided by Daily Mail (

Ms Berejiklian said she was launching a pilot project with the state's best brains which would take 12 to 24 months to complete.

She said the private sector, universities and the NSW Government already worked together during the pandemic on life-changing research.

'NSW is well placed to provide the advanced manufacturing workforce training, the scientific expertise and the physical location of a future RNA-based manufacturing hub,' she said.

'The state has an established advanced manufacturing capability and is well placed to be the home of mRNA manufacturing in Australia.'

Poorer countries might not get Covid-19 vaccinated until 2023

  Poorer countries might not get Covid-19 vaccinated until 2023 This inequality is baked into the vaccine manufacturing process.If these glaring inequities in vaccine access continue, it will take at least two years for the world’s poorest countries, who couldn’t compete for early doses of vaccines, to immunize 60 percent of their populations.

Experts have said creating mRNA manufacturing capacity would cost $250 million, The Sydney Morning Herald reported.

NSW Chief Health Officer Dr Kerry Chant said mRNA vaccines were easier to make than other vaccines.

'What makes them so exciting is that they’re relatively easy to produce, change [and] modify at low cost, and that’s why people are so interested in this as an emerging technology for vaccines into the future,' she said.

Read more

Australia likely to follow America’s lead in support for vaccine patent waiver, but it’s no magic bullet .
Even if Scott Morrison decides to fall into line behind Joe Biden, it doesn't solve the issue of material supply shortages.The temporary waiver is supported by many developing nations but is currently being blocked by the EU, UK, Switzerland, Japan, Norway, Canada, Brazil and Australia. It would allow countries to produce generic versions of the vaccines at a cheaper price, potentially speeding up manufacturing.

usr: 0
This is interesting!