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Australia SA lower house passes assisted dying laws

00:41  10 june  2021
00:41  10 june  2021 Source:   aap.com.au

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South Australian lower house MPs are set for a crucial debate on the fate of legislation to legalise voluntary assisted dying . The debate is scheduled to begin at 7.30pm on Wednesday night, with the House of Assembly to consider a number of amendments to the original bill which comfortably passed the If it passes , SA will become the fourth state to legalise voluntary assisted dying laws after Victoria, Western Australia and Tasmania. The original bill included 68 safeguards and a provision that people wishing to end their lives must be resident in SA for at least 12 months and at least 18 years old.

South Australian lower house MPs are set for a crucial debate on the fate of legislation to legalise voluntary assisted dying . The debate is scheduled to begin at 7.30pm on Wednesday night, with the House of Assembly to consider a number of amendments to the original bill which comfortably passed the upper house last month. If those amendments are all rejected, it could proceed to a final vote. But if some amendments are agreed to, the legislation will return to the Legislative Council for final approval.

South Australian lower house MPs have passed legislation to legalise voluntary assisted dying by a clear majority, following a late-night debate.

a group of people in a store: SA lower house MPs have passed legalising voluntary assisted dying laws, with amendments. © Kelly Barnes/AAP PHOTOS SA lower house MPs have passed legalising voluntary assisted dying laws, with amendments.

The House of Assembly met on Wednesday evening to consider a number of amendments to the original bill, which had comfortably passed the upper house last month.

MPs later passed the legislation 33 votes to 11.

Some amendments were agreed, meaning the bill will now return to the Legislative Council for final approval.

When it passes in the upper house, SA will become the fourth state to legalise voluntary assisted dying laws after Victoria, Western Australia and Tasmania.

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South Australian lower house MPs are set for a crucial debate on the fate of legislation to legalise voluntary assisted dying . The debate is scheduled to begin at 7.30pm on Wednesday night, with the House of Assembly to consider a number of amendments to the original bill which comfortably passed the upper house last month. If those amendments are all rejected, it could proceed to a final vote. But if some amendments are agreed to, the legislation will return to the Legislative Council for final approval.

South Australian lower house MPs are set for a crucial debate on the fate of legislation to legalise voluntary assisted dying . The debate is scheduled to begin at 7.30pm on Wednesday night, with the House of Assembly to consider a number of amendments to the original bill which comfortably But if some amendments are agreed to, the legislation will return to the Legislative Council for final approval. If it passes , SA will become the fourth state to legalise voluntary assisted dying laws after Victoria, Western Australia and Tasmania. The original bill included 68 safeguards and a provision that people

"We know this will be a bittersweet moment for families who've watched loved ones die in unbearable suffering in the absence of voluntary assisted dying laws," Voluntary Assisted Dying South Australia spokesperson Lainie Anderson said on Thursday.

"We hope they see this is a small victory for those who are gone, but still in our hearts."


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The original bill included 68 safeguards and a provision that people wishing to end their lives must be resident in SA for at least 12 months and at least 18 years old.

It requires patients to show they have decision-making capacity and are capable of informed consent and to undergo an assessment by two independent medical practitioners not related to the applicant.

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The bill now goes to the lower house for a final conscience vote by MPs and if it passes , SA will be the fourth state to legalise voluntary assisted dying laws . This is the state's 17th attempt in 25 years to introduce such laws . Mr Maher, who took up the cause in 2020 after watching his mother's suffering, had been The SA bill is based on Victoria's legislation and system, which Mr Maher has described as the 'Australian model of voluntary assisted dying '. Most concerns amongst MPs about the bill related to coercion and pressure, especially on elderly people. But Mr Maher said ahead of the vote 'there's just

Support group Voluntary Assisted Dying South Australia urged MPs to take "community sentiment to heart" with the majority of people in favour of assisted dying laws . "We believe this bill strikes the right balance between safeguarding the community and offering choice and compassion for those with an incurable illness," spokeswoman Lainie Anderson said. As well as Victoria, Western Australia recently passed similar laws that will come into force later this year, while legislation has also passed both houses in the Tasmanian parliament. The SA bill will be subject to a conscience vote by all MPs.

They must have their request verified by two independent witnesses and be experiencing intolerable suffering that cannot be relieved.

A terminal diagnosis and a life expectancy of fewer than six months, or 12 months for a person with a neurodegenerative disease, must also be confirmed.

Most concerns among MPs about the bill have related to coercion and pressure, especially on elderly people.

The legislation had the support of Premier Steven Marshall but all MPs were free to vote according to their conscience.

The bill was co-sponsored by upper house MP Kyam Maher and lower house MP Susan Close and was the 17th piece of legislation to be presented to parliament over 26 years on assisted dying.

"I have imagined this moment so many times over the last few months," Mr Maher tweeted early Thursday morning.

"So bloody pleased & proud and just a little emotional."

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usr: 0
This is interesting!