•   
  •   

Australia Furniture removalists from red zones barred from Victoria

11:05  16 july  2021
11:05  16 july  2021 Source:   9news.com.au

Vic seeks to stamp out NSW virus 'embers'

  Vic seeks to stamp out NSW virus 'embers' The "flying embers" from Sydney's worsening COVID-19 outbreak have blown into Victoria, with authorities working to stamp out separate virus spot fires.Victorian contact tracers are having trouble nailing down the movements of a Sydney-based removalist team, one of two new COVID-19 scares.

Victoria has banned furniture removalists from interstate "red zones" from crossing the border for at least the next two weeks.

The rule change came after two removalists travelled from NSW to South Australia, via Victoria, while positive with COVID-19.

Under the new rules, furniture and removal vehicles will not be permitted to travel to Victoria from NSW.

READ MORE: Thousands in isolation as Victoria records six new cases

Daniel Andrews wearing glasses and looking at the camera: Premier of Victoria, Daniel Andrews has announced a ban on furniture removalists from red zones. © Getty Premier of Victoria, Daniel Andrews has announced a ban on furniture removalists from red zones.

Approved freight trucks can still cross the border, but drivers will be tested for COVID-19 every three days.

Victoria records two Covid cases after removalist entered from Sydney

  Victoria records two Covid cases after removalist entered from Sydney Victoria has recorded two new locally-acquired coronavirus cases after infected removalists entered the state from Covid-ravaged NSW. The two new cases were previously announced on Monday afternoon and take Victoria's tally of active Covid-19 cases to 20.Another local case was acquired interstate. All three cases are members of the same Melbourne household who have been in isolation having recently returned from NSW on red zone permits.Meanwhile, an apartment complex in Melbourne is now in lockdown after being visited by the infected removalists who travelled from Sydney.

Victorian Premier Dan Andrews said it was the "appropriate" action to take.

"It is just a change we can make, particularly as things become more unstable and more challenging in terms of more case numbers coming out of Sydney," he said.


Video: NSW ‘will not hesitate’ to go harder with restrictions (Sky News Australia)

READ MORE: Exposure sites confirmed for Wallabies match in Melbourne

People who have already booked removalists for an interstate trip, such as moving house, will be dealt with individually.

"They can explain their circumstances and we can work with them on a case-by-case basis," Mr Andrews said.

He thanked the freight industry for cooperating with the government.

Hungry Jacks and a Caltex added to Melbourne's list of exposure sites

  Hungry Jacks and a Caltex added to Melbourne's list of exposure sites Anyone who visited Caltex or Hungry Jack's in Kalkallo, north of the city, on July 8 between 9.07am and 10.06am is considered a Tier one contact.Anyone who visited Caltex or Hungry Jack's in Kalkallo, north of the city, on July 8 between 9.07am and 10.06am is considered a Tier one contact, and must get tested and isolate for 14 days.

READ MORE: Defence member tests positive to coronavirus on Victorian naval base

"This is challenging but we are grateful to everyone in the freight sector, they have done a great job through all of this," he said.

South Australia has introduced similar rules, and Mr Andrews speculated that the issue might become a national one.

"I would think that all states will opt to pick up some of these changes and work with that freight industry to make sure we keep everyone safe," he said.

He also said he wouldn't rule out making it mandatory for any interstate worker to get tested before entering Victoria in the future.

Australians are living longer but what does it take to reach 100 years old? .
Exercise, eat your veggies and don't smoke: the age old advice for a long healthy life remains true but education, staying social and even optimism are important too, writes Catherine Taylor.And although scientists don't understand exactly why, research suggests she is correct.

usr: 3
This is interesting!