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Australia Accused COVID breacher Riccardo Bosi calls Adelaide magistrate an 'imbecile' during phone hearing

12:22  25 october  2021
12:22  25 october  2021 Source:   abc.net.au

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A former Special Forces officer charged with breaching South Australian COVID rules has called an Adelaide magistrate an "imbecile" and a "traitor" during his hearing.

Magistrate Jack Fahey hung up on Riccardo Bosi, who appeared via phone from New South Wales on Monday.

"You have no standing, you are at worst a traitor and at best an imbecile, the truth of which will be determined in due course," Mr Bosi told the court.

Magistrate Fahey told Mr Bosi "I'm fed up with this rubbish, I'm terminating this call", before cutting his line.

The court did not hear how Mr Bosi had allegedly breached directions.

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Mr Bosi will have to enter a plea at his next court date in January.

Second breacher plans to fight COVID direction legitimacy

Magistrate Fahey also heard the case of Adelaide agricultural scientist Graham Lyons, who refused a COVID test after arriving at Adelaide airport from interstate.

Mr Lyons was not allowed into the court for his hearing because he would not wear a mask and was represented by lawyer Angus Redford.

Outside court, surrounded by dozens of supporters, Mr Redford said he planned to fight Mr Lyons's direction breach charge by challenging the legitimacy of SA's COVID directions.

Mr Redford said he will argue the directions were written by Police Commissioner Grant Stevens and had not been rubber-stamped by parliament.

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"We live in a parliamentary democracy and as such these laws have not been the subject of any parliamentary scrutiny and we would challenge the validity of those laws on that basis," Mr Redford said.

"There's a secondary issue as to whether the parliament should be allowed to transfer its responsibilities to unelected officials."

Mr Lyons said he refused to get a PCR COVID test multiple times upon his arrival in the state.

"The first time, I was at the airport, the second time was at my home, a policeman visited me," Mr Lyons said outside court.

"I said, 'Didn't they tell you at the airport? I said I will not undergo those tests'."

Mr Lyons will face court again in December.

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