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Australia Australia's net zero by 2050 target wins praise from Fiji's PM, attracts disappointment from across the Pacific

08:30  28 october  2021
08:30  28 october  2021 Source:   abc.net.au

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Australia has long dragged its heels on climate action. It has some of the highest emissions per head of population and is a massive exporter of fossil fuels. Strategic allies the US and UK have both pledged to cut emissions faster. The UK has pledged that all its electricity will come from renewable sources by 2035 This requires cutting emissions by 45% by 2030 and reaching net zero by 2050 , scientists say. Over 100 nations have committed to carbon neutrality. Net zero means not adding to the amount of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. It is achieved by a combination of cutting emissions as much as

Australia is “meeting and beating” emissions targets in the “ Australian way,” according to the prime minister Scott Morrison , who today committed to a net zero by 2050 target with a plan that makes no mention of harder 2030 cuts, relying instead on “existing” and “emerging” technologies. South Australia will relax its border restrictions from 23 November under a Covid plan that will allow fully vaccinated travellers from hotspots back into the state. Victoria reported 1,510 new Covid cases and four deaths as new pandemic laws were introduced to parliament. The laws will replace the state of

Frank Bainimarama is welcoming Australia's net zero by 2050 target. (ABC News: Tamara Penniket) © Provided by ABC NEWS Frank Bainimarama is welcoming Australia's net zero by 2050 target. (ABC News: Tamara Penniket)

Fiji's Prime Minister Frank Bainimarama has made it very clear that he doesn't want any more excuses on climate action from big emitters, including Australia, when they gather for this year's global climate talks in Glasgow.

Mr Bainimarama has previously said that he, and other Pacific islanders, want world leaders to pledge carbon emission cuts of 50 per cent or more by 2030.

However, he has now welcomed the new climate policy announced by his "friend", Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison.

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Australia ' s 2050 net - zero carbon emissions target will rely on existing technologies to meet 85 per cent of the goal, with the remainder to be achieved through new breakthroughs. © Lukas Coch/AAP PHOTOS Scott Morrison has revealed Australia ' s plan to achieve net - zero emissions by 2050 . Prime Minister Scott Morrison on Tuesday confirmed he would take the commitment to the United Nations climate conference which starts on Sunday in Glasgow. Load Error. Australia ' s carbon emissions have fallen 20 per cent since 2005.

Australia will aim for net zero carbon emissions by 2050 but will not pass legislation about the goal. A new nationwide injunction has been granted against Insulate Britain protesters which means they could be jailed if they block any motorway or major A road across England. Transport Secretary Grant Shapps said the protesters were “back, risking lives and ruining journeys” after activists brought the streets of the City of London and Canary Wharf to a standstill on Monday morning.

Mr Morrison announced on Tuesday that Australia will join the bulk of the developed word in pursuing net zero emissions by 2050, but its formal target for 2030 remains unchanged: a 26–28 per cent reduction in emissions.

But Mr Bainimarama — who will be one of a few Pacific leaders able to attend COP26, the UN's global climate talks that start on Sunday — said he would continue to push for "high-emitting nations to halve emissions by 2030".

He described that as "the only goal that can keep 1.5 [degree Celsius rise in temperatures] alive and keep low-lying island nations above water".

Other Pacific leaders have been more critical of Australia's new policy, lamenting what they see as a lack of ambition.

The President of the Federated States of Micronesia, David Panuelo, said Australia's announcement was too vague and "not quite clear".

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Australia pivots on climate with 2050 net zero target , but won 't adopt steeper 2030 commitment. I therefore welcome the announcement by Australia to commit to net zero emissions by 2050 . Australia Sets Target for Net - Zero Emissions by 2050 Ahead of COP26. Net zero by 2050 - the PM reveals government' s new climate commitment | ABC News.

Just how Australia will get to net zero by 2050 carbon emissions remains unclear, with the government refusing to release its modeling. The plan would invest US billion in low-emission technologies over the next decade, but it also leans heavily on unproven technologies and carbon offsets, which critics Australia ' s reluctance to act had been criticized by close allies such as the United States and Britain, as well as Pacific island neighbors that are highly vulnerable to the impacts of climate change. The coalition government has also found itself increasingly out of step with Australians ' attitudes as they

"To me, as a leader [who] sees climate change as an existential threat to our entire Pacific population, it's somewhat hollow," Mr Panuelo told the ABC.

"The more you read of Australia's nationally determined contributions plan, the less you know what they are really going to do," he said.

"I'm deeply concerned that, if Australia doesn't have that measurable commitment, it's going to hurt the credibility and the livelihood of the Pacific community."

Next week's talks in Glasgow have been described as the "point of no return" and the world's last chance stop rising temperatures to avoid catastrophic climate events, such as severe sea level rises, droughts and intense storms.

Australia plans to cut its emissions by 2050 through the use of future technology such as hydrogen power and carbon capture and storage.

Some of those technologies, including carbon capture and storage, remain largely unproven.

How the world reacted to Australia's net zero plan

  How the world reacted to Australia's net zero plan Headlines and news articles around the world were heavily critical of the net zero 2050 climate plan unveiled by Prime Minister Scott Morrison.Using less colourful language, the world's media were marginally more restrained than the Atlassian founder in running the rule over Prime Minister Scott Morrison's plan - but not by much.

MOSCOW (Sputnik) – The Australian government presented on Tuesday a state strategy designed to help the country hit a net - zero emission objective by 2050 26.10.2021, Sputnik International.

One of the world’ s most criticised polluters, Australia , has promised it will achieve net zero carbon emissions by 2050 . PM Scott Morrison made the long-delayed pledge after bargaining with resistant MPs within his government. He said Australia had a plan to lower emissions, but it would not include ending its massive fossil fuel sectors. This requires cutting emissions by 45% by 2030 and reaching net zero by 2050 , scientists say. Over 100 nations have committed to carbon neutrality. Australia has long dragged its heels on climate action, putting it increasingly at odds with strategic allies including the US and UK.

Mr Panuelo is not impressed with the Australian government's reliance on such future technology.

"Technology is great, but some technology amounts to, in my view, public relations," he said.

Target not ambitious enough

Anote Tong, a former president of Kiribati, a low-lying atoll nation in the Pacific, said Australia's plan doesn't go far enough to prevent a climate catastrophe for Pacific countries.

"We remain disappointed [because] 2050 [is] still a long way away … I think Australia really is not showing any leadership on the climate issue," Mr Tong told the ABC.

He said Australia's lack of ambition might set the stage for other countries to water down the commitments reached at the COP26 talks in Glasgow.

"What Australia is doing, is encouraging everybody else not to do what needs to be done," Mr Tong said.

"For the Pacific Island countries who really are on the frontline of this of the challenge, this is extremely disappointing. We would have expected a lot more."

However, the Solomon Islands' lead climate negotiator, Chanel Iroi, was more diplomatic, welcoming Australia's announcement.

But, he said, there was still room for improvement.

"I want to encourage Australia to meet the necessary steps … to ensure they continue to take the ambitious actions … because our obligation and ultimate aim is for the global goal … to ensure the 1.5C [maximum rise in temperatures] is achieved," he said.

Australia looks like a climate laggard, as other countries ramp-up efforts .
The government is confident Australia will cut emissions by more than 26 per cent below 2005 levels by 2030, but data shows our ambition is insufficient by almost any measure. Labor is calling for stronger 2030 targets, although the opposition won't say what those targets should be until after the Glasgow conference.Others have been clearer. The Business Council of Australia has backflipped on earlier calls to go slow on climate action and is now calling for a 46-per-cent cut by 2030.Some in the government have called for stronger targets too.

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