•   
  •   

Australia Optus takes out full-page newspaper advertisements to apologise over data breach

08:20  01 october  2022
08:20  01 october  2022 Source:   abc.net.au

Optus customers slam telco for failing to protect data in major breach as hackers demand ransom

  Optus customers slam telco for failing to protect data in major breach as hackers demand ransom The hacker who claims to have stolen the personal details of millions of Optus customers has demanded $1.5 million in ransom money as outraged Aussies slam the telco for failing to protect their data. The hacker has warned personal addresses, dates of birth, phone numbers, drivers' licences, and passport details of millions will be leaked if Optus doesn't pay $US1million (AU$1.53million) in cryptocurrency Monero.They claim to have access to the details of 11.2 million Optus customers in a major breach that tech experts at this stage believe is legitimate.

Optus says it needs to communicate better. (ABC News: Dannielle Maguire) © Provided by ABC NEWS Optus says it needs to communicate better. (ABC News: Dannielle Maguire)

Optus has apologised to people affected by last week's cyber attack, admitting that it needs to communicate better with people caught up in the data breach.

The telecommunications company took out full-page advertisements in major newspapers around the country to say how "deeply sorry" it was.

"We've heard your message that we need to communicate more clearly," the ad says.

"That's why we've now put together easily accessible materials for you to stay informed on the actions you can take."

It directs people to a website dedicated to updates about the cyber attack.

Optus data breach: Millions of Australians may be able to claim compensation after cyber attack

  Optus data breach: Millions of Australians may be able to claim compensation after cyber attack Kylie Carson, a special counsel specialising in general compensation at Shine Lawyers, said if an Optus customer had a financial loss as a result of the data breach, they may be able to pursue a claim. © Provided by Daily Mail More than 11 million Australians have potentially had their personal addresses, dates of birth, phone numbers, passport details and drivers licences stolen in the cyber security attack last week © Provided by Daily Mail Kylie Carson, a special counsel specialising in general compensation at Shine Lawyers, said if an Optus customer had a financial loss as a result of the data breach, they

What does the ad say?

Here's the full text:

We're deeply sorry that a cyberattack has happened on our watch.

We know this is devastating and that we'll need to work hard to regain your trust.

The attack was quickly shut down, and we are working closely with authorities to understand how this attack on your privacy occurred.

Our priority is preventing harm to customers.

We are here to assist and support you through any personal concern that you may be feeling.

We know there's a lot of information and misinformation out there, and we've heard your message that we need to communicate more clearly.

That's why we've now put together easily accessible materials for you to stay informed on the actions you can take at optus.com.au/support/cyberattack.

Optus data hacker scandal takes ridiculous turn as man sent customer's phone numbers and bills

  Optus data hacker scandal takes ridiculous turn as man sent customer's phone numbers and bills Samuel Leighton-Dore posted screenshots of a conversation he claims to have had with an Optus support worker - who appears to have accidentally sent him private information. 'Now Optus support leaking other people's phone numbers and bill amounts to me,' he posted to Twitter, alongside an image of the chat.

What's the latest update?

As of Saturday morning, the Optus website's latest update was about Friday's press conference from the Australia Federal Police (AFP) about Operation Guardian.

It says the AFP would "supercharge" the protection of more than 10,000 customers whose details were published online on Tuesday.

An online account that claimed to be behind the attack asked for a ransom of $US1 million and threatened to release customers' details if it wasn't paid.

On Tuesday morning, the account released the details of more than 10,000 people on an online forum before deleting the post and apologising a few hours later.

"Customers affected by the breach will receive multi-jurisdictional and multi-layered protection from identity crime and financial fraud," Optus' website says.

"The 10,000 individuals, who potentially had 100 points of identification released online, will be prioritised."

The most sinister declassified CIA operations .
The Central Intelligence Agency, better known simply as the CIA, has inspired fear, suspicion, and curiosity ever since its official formation in 1947. Before it was called the CIA, it was known as the Office of Strategic Services, and was responsible for some of the most covert operations during and after World War II. As the CIA, the organization has become notorious for an apparent disregard of federal and international law, and is suspected to handle some projects that even the president of the United States is unaware of. From toppling governments and staging false flag operations, to introducing one of the world's most addictive drugs to the US, the covert operations of the CIA that have come to light are, if nothing else, fascinating to read about. Intrigued? Read on to learn more about some of the CIA's declassified deeds.

usr: 0
This is interesting!