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Australia Smiling through the dry: Drought-hit schools work hard to keep students happy

12:56  10 august  2018
12:56  10 august  2018 Source:   abc.net.au

Federal government announces drought aid

  Federal government announces drought aid The federal government will announce a $190 million drought assistance package to help farmers affected by the biggest dry in the past century.Farmers will receive immediate additional financial support to help them and their communities fight one of the worst droughts of the past century.

If they don ' t get it, maybe some extra work for the whole class to keep them busy. Hi Susan, Great article. Schools are seeing kids leave as their families fight to combat the consequences of the dry spell. If the drought persists, Hernandez knows that some of his students —mostly poor, Hispanic

Tiny schools in drought -ravaged regions find creative and practical ways to help students and their families stay positive.

Tiny schools in drought-ravaged regions are finding creative and practical ways to help kids and their families stay positive.

Trundle Central School, in the central west region of New South Wales, has had to sell most of its sheep but principal John Southon said they were not focusing on the negative impacts of the drought.

"What we are doing very well is that we are remaining positive; we're not letting this drought pull us down," Mr Southon said.

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Tiny schools in drought -ravaged regions are finding creative and practical ways to help kids and their families stay positive.

Tiny schools in drought -ravaged regions find creative and practical ways to help students and their families stay positive. Trundle Central School , in the central west region of New South Wales, has had to sell most of its sheep but principal John Southon said they were not focusing on the negative

"We have kids who are working very long hours after school, they're feeding sheep, and they're taking on the pressures of their parents.

"We've socialised our country kids to be tough … they say 'there are kids worse off than us' but I don't believe that anymore.

"These kids are seeing death, dust storms … I want the kids to see Trundle Central School as an oasis in their life."

Students at Trundle Central School who are smiling through the drought.© ABC Central West/Donal Sheil Students at Trundle Central School who are smiling through the drought. The school has come up with a range of creative ways to cope, including upgrading its showers and opening them to the community.

"Some of our kids are washing in buckets because it costs around $700 to get a load of water out to some of these properties," Mr Southon said.

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Living through the Big Dry . Seven Network 18 August 2018.

The Los Banos Unified School District could lose up to 5 percent of its students , says Superintendent Steve Tietjen. At least this year, he won't have to make that decision. The California Department of Education says it's going to work with schools hit hardest by the drought to make sure they don ' t

"I don't know whether people understand what it's like for a teenage girl not to be able to have long, therapeutic, I'm-a-teenager-shower in the afternoon.

"A family can pick up a key out of my letterbox and have a hot shower."

The school has also taken donations of old cars which are being used in mechanical and artistic projects.

Year Nine student Nick Williams said the new assignments worked as a distraction from the realities of the drought.

"It gets your brain going, gets your brain off the drought, and puts it on putting a motor back together," he said.

"I can focus, but it certainly sets you back a little bit when your stock aren't going real well."

Technology teacher Lisa Rollins said a student trip to the snow would continue to go ahead, despite families struggling financially.

Woodwork students have been making chopping boards and selling them to raise money for the excursion.

Religion in decline in Australian schools

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Helping students grow and succeed is the goal of every teacher. This article looks at 8 things that you can do to foster student success. Students don ' t like to deviate from the established norms and will become advocates in your classroom to make sure things run smoothly.

Working through college won' t cover all of a student 's education expenses. It can lighten the debt burden, though, and pay off in other ways — good news for the growing number of students who work while attending school .

"It's pretty cool to have a positive to look forward to at the moment," Ms Rollins said.

"It's hard to imagine that just two years ago students were being evacuated from the school's back oval because of flooding."

Students have also painted over brown parts of school buildings with white, so that they can escape the colour of the big dry.

Student Holly Tomlinson said the approach was working.

"You know it is going to be a good day when you come here," she said.

Plays bring students together

Students from across drought-affected areas in the New England region of New South Wales are coming together to perform plays with ABC New England North West staff.

The first performance will be staged at Ben Lomond Public School where principal Kirsten Reim welcomed the distraction.

"These kids are fairly resilient, but we always talk about rain," she said.

"Every conversation starts with 'how much rain have you had?'"

Student Ruben Jolly, whose family owns a cattle property, said he was looking forward to the play.

"I've been practising 'If You're Happy and You Know It,'" he said.

Selective school application fees 'problematic' for public education

  Selective school application fees 'problematic' for public education Some NSW selective schools are charging non-refundable application fees of up to $100 for students seeking entry after year 7.Most of the state's top selective schools, including James Ruse High School, North Sydney Girls, North Sydney Boys, St George Girls High School, Hornsby Girls High School, Girraween High School, Gosford High School and Northern Beaches Secondary College Manly Campus all charge application fees of between $30 to $100 depending on students' year groups.

Some students , even in high school , do not understand why they are being disciplined. Make it clear in a way that lets the student know you want their success. Find a time to discuss what happened to lead to the discipline. If kids know you are still on their side, they will try harder to do better for you.

To keep students involved and on their toes, try to move from teacher-centered learning to student -centered active learning, and vice versa. Here's how: Introduce a presentation by having students pair up, talk to each other about their prior knowledge of the presentation, and generate a

Performances will also take place at Bellata and Blackville.

Pictures: Australia's drought - the cancer eating away at farms

The Wider Image: Australia's drought - the cancer eating away at farms: A lone tree stands near a water trough in a drought-effected paddock on Jimmie and May McKeown's property located on the outskirts of town of Walgett, in New South Wales, Australia, July 20, 2018. From ground level, Australia's drought looks like a featureless, brown dustbowl, but from the air it transforms into an artistry of colour and texture as the land cracks under a blazing sun. Australia's drought - the cancer eating away at farms

Visit Drought SOS: For more news, informationand how to help Australian farmers.

Nicole Kidman and Keith Urban donate to drought relief .
Nicole Kidman and Keith Urban appeared in a video message on Today's Farm Aid Telethon to donate a whopping $100,000 to support struggling Australian farmers during the current drought. Speaking in the clip, country singer Keith said, "We wish we could be with you today but I'm on tour, but it is very important for us to be a part of this today and do our bit for the farmers." "We love Australia and we realise that there's been a crippling drought crisis and the rural communities are doing it really, really hard right now so we want to do our bit.

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