Australia: Women's biggest heart attack risk factors - PressFrom - Australia
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AustraliaWomen's biggest heart attack risk factors

04:46  08 november  2018
04:46  08 november  2018 Source:   msn.com

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Women with bigger waists relative to their hips are at more risk of heart attacks than men of a similar "apple shape", research from the George Institute for Global Health says. The study showed waist-to-hip ratio to be a better heart attack predictor than general obesity - 18% stronger than body mass.

Table of contents. Symptoms. Post-menopause. Risk factors . When to see a doctor. When to call emergency services. Prevention. Takeaway. A heart attack is a life-threatening event caused by a disruption in the blood flow to the heart .

Women's biggest heart attack risk factors© AAP Images Smoking, diabetes and high blood pressure puts women at greater risk than men of having a heart attack, a study has found. Women who smoke, have diabetes or high blood pressure face a greater risk of suffering a life-threatening heart attack than men.

An international study of 472,000 middle-aged adults with no history of cardiovascular disease found while men were three times as likely as women to have heart attacks, certain risk factors were increasing the chances among women.

Researchers from The George Institute for Global Health in Australia and Britain found both men and women had increased risks of heart attack if they smoked, had diabetes or high blood pressure and were overweight.

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Heart attack risk factors include Men age 45 or older and women age 55 or older are more likely to have a heart attack than are younger men and women .

Some of the main factors that can predispose a person to heart attack include smoking cigarettes, having high blood pressure and high cholesterol, being overweight, and having diabetes. Whom do these risk factors affect the most, however?

But women who were heavy smokers, had high blood pressure, and were diagnosed with type I or type II diabetes faced what the researchers called an "excess risk".

"Overall, more men experience heart attacks than women," said the study's lead author, Dr Elizabeth Millett, an epidemiologist at The George Institute at the University of Oxford.

"However, several major risk factors increase the risk in women more than they increase the risk in men, so women with these factors experience a relative disadvantage."

The researchers found the "excess risk" of having a heart attack among women who smoked more than 20 cigarettes compared to women who never smoked was twice as great as that for men.

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New U.K. research has found that smoking, diabetes and high blood pressure, key risk factors for heart disease, may have a bigger impact on the risk in women than in men.

Women with bigger waists relative to their hips are at more risk of heart attacks than men of a similar "apple shape", research from the George Institute for Global Health says. The study showed waist-to-hip ratio to be a better heart attack predictor than general obesity - 18% stronger than body mass

Women with high blood pressure also had an 80 per cent higher relative risk of heart attack than men.

And women with type I diabetes faced an almost three times higher relative risk, while for those with type II diabetes it was 47 per cent greater.

"Our findings suggest that clinicians should be vigilant when their female patients are elderly, smoke, have diabetes, or have high blood pressure," the researchers wrote in a paper published by The British Medical Journal on Thursday.

"In addition, a rising prevalence of lifestyle associated risk factors, coupled with the ageing population, is likely to result in women having a more similar overall rate of myocardial infarction (heart attack) to men in the future, with a major additional burden on society and health resources."

The researchers based their findings on a review of data collected as part of the UK Biobank, a long-term health study of more than 500,000 people.

More than 7800 Australians died after having heart attacks last year, an average of 21 people a day.

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