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Entertainment Hollywood will stop making reboots when you stop paying for them

04:35  07 december  2019
04:35  07 december  2019 Source:   cnet.com

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Has Hollywood run out of ideas? You 'd be forgiven for asking that question. In 2019, it feels as though a significant percentage of movies released in One generation might be nostalgic about something they used to watch as kids, but their own children might not be interested in a comeback of that show

Hollywood will stop making reboots when you stop paying for them by koavf in movies. This was the year I finally told EA to kiss my ass. Now, I'll probably buy Madden and NHL around the turn of the New Year when they 're marked down, but I'm not paying anymore.

a cat looking at the camera: The Lion King remake raked in $1 billion only weeks after its release. Walt Disney Pictures © Provided by CBS Interactive Inc. The Lion King remake raked in $1 billion only weeks after its release. Walt Disney Pictures Has Hollywood run out of ideas? 

You'd be forgiven for asking that question. In 2019, it feels as though a significant percentage of movies released in theatres are sequels or remakes of hits from 20 years ago. 

People are starting to take notice. Entire Reddit threads are dedicated to complaints about this resurgence, and Twitter is ripe with commentary on every new movie and TV show being brought back from the dead.

Just this year, Toy Story 4, Men in Black International and the live-action remake of The Lion King were among the top box office hits. Charlie's Angels will join the long list of remakes in November, and Friday brought word that we're getting another Pirates of the Caribbean. In the world of TV, networks and streaming platforms have brought back shows like Gilmore Girls, Full House and Will and Grace. It seems the reboot and remake trend has reached a fever pitch, and much of that can be traced to our longing for the past. 

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They key to stopping reboots ? Stop paying for them . Hollywood will stop making reboots when you stop paying for them - CNET.

Hollywood will stop making reboots when you stop paying for them . It's that they just decided to stop using color halfway through. (self.movies). submitted 2 years ago by FreakaJebus. There are better ways for a series to get "darker" than by literally turning them in to almost black and white films.

"We're looking at a peak nostalgia moment," says Ryan Lizardi, assistant professor of digital media design and humanities at SUNY Polytechnic Institute. 

But nostalgia isn't all that's at play here. Reboots, remakes and revivals are nothing new. Star Trek, for example, has had several iterations through the decades, and A Star is Born has been remade multiple times since the first version of the film debuted in the 1930s. Today, though, we're inundated with revived content everywhere from network television to movie theatres to streaming platforms like Netflix and Hulu, as well as soon-to-be competitors like Disney Plus and Peacock, NBC's newly announced streaming service.

A key reason for this resurgence traces back, unsurprisingly, to money. Creating original content is a costly risk not many studios are willing to take these days. As the price of making movies and TV shows rises, studios are less likely to take a gamble on fresh content because there's so much at stake, says Ross Richie, founder and CEO of comics company Boom! Studios, part of an industry with a vested interest in adapting existing properties. Pulling from previously successful content offers more of a guarantee audiences will latch on. 

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Hollywood isn’t making these decisions in a vacuum. They ’re giving audiences what they want. Even in 2013, only 20 of the Top 50 films were remakes/ reboots /sequels, compared to 15 in 1985. The harsh reality is that audiences pay for sequels, and they aren’t as friendly to new movies as they like

Hollywood will stop making reboots when you stop paying for them by koavf in movies. [–] ShinePDX 0 points1 point2 points 4 days ago (0 children). Sounds like you do have a problem with it if it when it pertains to important issues.

"If you're given a choice between something new and original that you've not experienced or something that you already like, you tend to choose the thing you already like," Richie said. "You understand what it is, and you've had a previously positive experience with it, so there's a high likelihood you'll have a good experience with it again." 

Comforting familiarity

a woman standing on a stage: A Star is Born has been remade three times. Warner Bros © Provided by CBS Interactive Inc. A Star is Born has been remade three times. Warner Bros The current media landscape has played no small role in shaping today's trend. Streaming platforms, hungry for content, revive old network shows not just because they see the economic viability of nostalgia, Lizardi says, but because they need more content than ever before. That's why we see platforms like Netflix bringing back Gilmore Girls, HBO Max rebooting Gossip Girl and Peacock heavily promoting the return of shows like Saved by the Bell and Battlestar Galactica.  

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Hollywood will stop making reboots when you stop paying for them . 6471 · 1143 comments. In Time. It was one of the most intriguing movies I'd ever heard of: 1) Unique premise: everyone stops aging at 25 and from then on the days/hours/minutes of your remaining life is literally currency that is

Hollywood will stop making reboots when you stop paying for them by koavf in movies. Thankfully, the latter doesn't happen that often. Not because companies care about MY time, but because they pay for bandwidth and don't want to waste it on downloads of stuff they knew was

Streaming services, are, in a sense, working to re-create old-time family viewing in the modern-day using these shows, says Kathleen Looke, a postdoc fellow at Freie Universitat Berlin. Companies like Netflix stream original episodes so younger viewers can be brought up to speed before watching the revival with their parents or siblings, as was the norm back when these shows first aired on TV. 

I get angry that something from my childhood is being remade, but I'm the first in line to see it.

Ryan Lizardi, professor of digital media design and humanities

For people who did grow up watching the original versions, being able to go back and see familiar faces and scenes can be comforting in more tumultuous times, Looke notes.

"There are few revivals that change the essence of what these shows have been before," she said. "That gives reassurance that things remain the same, even though that actually doesn't match our times, which are much more fragmented."

Some reboots, like One Day at a Time, put a modern-day, progressive spin on original content by incorporating a more diverse cast and addressing contemporary issues such as immigration. Other revivals, like Fuller House and Gilmore Girls, tend to stick with many of the same attributes of the originals, Looke notes, such as featuring a primarily white cast. 

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Hollywood will stop making reboots when you stop paying for them . then before anything can be done the last guy is killed. This totally makes sense to me because both the quote from the guard as well as the introduction of the fiance near the end of the movie seem like they are there for no reason

Hollywood will stop making reboots when you stop paying for them . There's an influx of recycled movies and TV shows. Lawsuits involving at least 34 women allege the ride-hailing company isn't doing enough to stop them .

Then there are films like the all-female remake of Ghostbusters, which did poorly at the box office but still scored a higher rating on both CNET sister site Metacritic and Rotten Tomatoes than 1989's Ghostbusters II (though it didn't top the original). And it turns out we'll be seeing yet another return of Ghostbusters next summer, but it'll only pull from the original, male-dominated cast.

Audiences are more likely to choose a show in an increasingly crowded marketplace if they have a point of entry, says Myles McNutt, assistant professor at Old Dominion University. When studios launch a new series, they hope audiences can develop a relationship with it. Reboots and revivals have the advantage of already being familiar to viewers and potential subscribers. 

"With a reboot or revival, you've got something to start with," McNutt said. "That's ultimately a real value within the TV industry, whether you're trying to get somebody to watch a show and watch ads, or if you're trying to get someone to subscribe to a streaming service."

At the cinema

Movie studios are in fierce competition with streaming services to produce content that'll pique viewers' interests and get them to leave their homes. Because of the influx in entertainment choices, people may be less inclined to go to the movies and risk walking away feeling dissatisfied, says Jonathan Tower, general partner at venture capital firm Catapult

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Hollywood will stop making reboots when you stop paying for them . There's an influx of recycled movies and TV shows. Lawsuits involving at least 34 women allege the ride-hailing company isn't doing enough to stop them .

Hollywood will stop making reboots when you stop paying for them . There's an influx of recycled movies and TV shows. Lawsuits involving at least 34 women allege the ride-hailing company isn't doing enough to stop them .

But if the film playing is the latest instalment in a franchise or a remake of an old favourite, they may be more likely to get off the couch. Box office numbers reflect this. The Lion King remake, for example, raked in $1 billion nearly two weeks after its release, beating its animated counterpart. Other Disney remakes like 2017's Beauty and the Beast and 2019's Aladdin also crossed the $1 billion mark. Only two of the top 20 films on Box Office Mojo's list of highest-grossing films so far this year are originals. 

"People are drawn to those stories and those franchises because they know what they're getting for their money," Tower said. "The sense that they might be disappointed is mitigated by that."

As companies like Disney, which completed its acquisition of 21st Century Fox earlier this year, grow and become more successful, they need bigger hits, which are expensive to produce, says Richie. The Lion King remake, for example, reportedly had a budget of around $260 million, and Avengers: Endgame cost around $350 million to make. Studios are therefore far more risk-averse, especially if they have a broad catalogue of recognizable brands to choose from. 

"The larger a company gets," Richie says, "the more predictability they need."

Not a guaranteed success

Isabella Gomez, Rita Moreno, Todd Grinnell, Justina Machado, Stephen Tobolowsky, Dickie Moore posing for a photo: Some reboots, like One Day at a Time, get modern-day updates, such as a more diverse cast and episodes focusing on contemporary issues. Netflix © Provided by CBS Interactive Inc. Some reboots, like One Day at a Time, get modern-day updates, such as a more diverse cast and episodes focusing on contemporary issues. Netflix That doesn't mean viewers want everything to get a modern-day spin. Many were up in arms when rumours began circulating about a possible Princess Bride remake. Even actor Cary Elwes, who played Westley in the film spoke out about the reports, tweeting, "There's a shortage of perfect movies in this world. It would be a pity to damage this one."

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Hollywood will stop making reboots when you stop paying for them . There's an influx of recycled movies and TV shows. Lawsuits involving at least 34 women allege the ride-hailing company isn't doing enough to stop them .

Hollywood will stop making reboots when you stop paying for them . There's an influx of recycled movies and TV shows. Lawsuits involving at least 34 women allege the ride-hailing company isn't doing enough to stop them .

News that Disney is planning a remake of Home Alone sparked similar reactions. Star Macaulay Culkin weighed in with a joke, but many were outraged the childhood classic would be reimagined. 

While some remakes become box office hits, not all are well received by critics and audiences. Men in Black: International, for example, didn't score as highly as expected, despite having a generous budget and a cast of big-name actors. And when Disney did a remake of The Lone Ranger in 2013, it was also met with poor reviews. Other remakes of previously successful films like The Mummy were also box office flops

Studios might also feel that the digital tools they have today can help an older film level up, but that's not always the case. Fresher effects on the 2012 remake of Total Recall, for example, didn't make the story work any better the second time around, Tower says. That's a lesson for Hollywood that sometimes it's good to leave things alone, he notes.  

Pictures: Who would play these iconic characters today? (Espresso)

Jeff Bridges sitting on a table: Whether you like it or not, modern Hollywood is all about the reboots and remakes, from A Star is Born to The Lion King to Spider-Man (and The Amazing Spider-Man and Spider-Man: Homecoming). There’s no point in fighting it, so we thought it would be fun to reimagine some of the most iconic movie characters of all time with actors and actresses from today.   

Still, it's hard to shake the money-making opportunities remakes offer. A film may struggle at the box office but make money in other areas like merchandising, cross-branding and product placement, Tower says. Therefore, studios feel it's a fairly low-risk bet to remake a film, even if it originally wasn't that strong creatively or critically. If they're even half right, he says, companies feel they'll at least make their money back or rake in a bit of a profit. 

The same goes with television. Even if a show like the Gilmore Girls revival doesn't continue into a second season, it's a success if it convinces people to subscribe to Netflix, McNutt notes. If content generates buzz or leads to ad sales, it undoubtedly brings value. 

Regardless of what critics and numbers say, there's an undeniable pull among viewers when an old-time favorite is brought back.

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Hollywood will stop making reboots when you stop paying for them . There's an influx of recycled movies and TV shows. Lawsuits involving at least 34 women allege the ride-hailing company isn't doing enough to stop them .

"I get angry that something from my childhood is being remade," Lizardi said, "but I'm the first in line to see it."

Other industries are also experiencing a similar resurgence of old content. Video game companies continue to crank out miniaturized versions of classical consoles like Nintendo's NES Classic, and are bringing back retro games like Atari's Pong and Night Drive. Arcade machines are also wooing today's gaming fans, and classic board games like Operation are being reimagined. And then there's the slew of musical comebacks like the Spice Girls, who announced a reunion tour last fall, and the Jonas Brothers, who joined forces again earlier this year

"It seems to be a cross-cultural, cross-media movement," Lizardi said.

A shifting landscape

This trend isn't likely to go away soon, says Derek Kompare, associate professor at Southern Methodist University. Media companies will likely continue to acquire intellectual property and rights to things they can develop, he says. 

We might see changes in what gets rebooted, revived or remade as audiences age and change, Kompare notes. One generation might be nostalgic about something they used to watch as kids, but their own children might not be interested in a comeback of that show or movie. 

What people want to see will also become more variable in the future, he predicts, since millennials and members of Gen Z had more options of what to watch as kids than did older generations. 

"If you want to scale something up and do the movie version of [it], that's going to be tricky to do because there are so many different things people may be into at a particular moment," he said.

It may not be clear what kind of content we'll see resurfaced in the coming years, but one thing's for certain: There's a high chance it'll still look pretty familiar.  

Pictures: Popular TV reboots and revivals

Qantas picks A350-1000 for non-stop London, New York flights .
Qantas has chosen the aircraft it will use for non-stop flights to New York and London, but delayed its decision on whether it will go ahead with the new routes.The airline on Friday said the Airbus jet had beaten Boeing's 777X-8 as the preferred aircraft for its so-called "Project Sunrise" flights, which will be the longest commercial airline routes in aviation history.

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