•   
  •   

Entertainment Incredible life of the woman who became the Notorious RBG

04:43  19 september  2020
04:43  19 september  2020 Source:   dailymail.co.uk

Obituary: Ruth Bader Ginsburg

  Obituary: Ruth Bader Ginsburg The US Supreme Court justice was a feminist heroine, cultural icon and national treasure.Ginsburg became only the second woman ever to serve as a justice on the nation's highest court.

Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the second woman to serve as a Supreme Court Justice, a legal pioneer who broke barriers for women in law, a feminist icon to many, and the recent pop culture phenomenon known as the ' Notorious RBG ' has died.

“[ The Notorious RBG ] book mixes cheeky fan art with a serious – and stirring – account of Ginsburg’s life and work, covering everything from her Pretty much no one, including most law professors, can name the justices of the Japan Supreme Court, who are chosen for their anonymity, their conformity

Ruth Bader Ginsburg wearing glasses and smiling at the camera: Ruth Bader Ginsburg, pictured above in 2009, served for 27 years on the highest court of the land and was the second woman to be appointed to the Supreme Court © Provided by Daily Mail Ruth Bader Ginsburg, pictured above in 2009, served for 27 years on the highest court of the land and was the second woman to be appointed to the Supreme Court

Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the second woman to serve as a Supreme Court Justice, a legal pioneer who broke barriers for women in law, a feminist icon to many, and the recent pop culture phenomenon known as the 'Notorious RBG' has died.

She passed away from complications of pancreatic cancer at the age of 87.

Ruth Bader Ginsburg: progressive icon of US Supreme Court, dies at 87

  Ruth Bader Ginsburg: progressive icon of US Supreme Court, dies at 87 Ruth Bader Ginsburg was small in stature, but her influence was enormous -- both as a champion of women's rights early in her career and as a progressive force on the US Supreme Court. - Unlikely pop culture hero - The tiny woman with a low ponytail was a force to be reckoned in her career, and was seen by many as an inspirational figure. Her exercise regimen was turned into a workout book. Halloween costumes were popular for young girls and women alike. Sometimes, she was depicted wearing a gold crown.For Shana Knizhnik, one of the creators of the Notorious RBG blog, the justice's appeal transcended generational differences.

" RBG " details the incredible life and legal legacy of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the second CNN Films Presents: ' RBG '. Directed and produced by award-winning filmmakers Betsy West and Julie Court Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg through the eyes of the people who know her best.

“ Notorious RBG ” became the name of a book on her life in 2015 and “ RBG ” was a 2018 Oscar-nominated documentary. The story of her young life – fighting to be taken seriously as a Jewish woman in the "good old boys"’ world of the 1950s and '60s – was also fictionalized in the 2018 award-winning

She served for 27 years on the highest court of the land and was the second woman to be appointed to the Supreme Court.

The collar-wearing octogenarian captured the public's imagination – especially for those on the left who offered everything from kale to protective bubbles to later on wearing masks on social media to safeguard her continued tenure on the highest court in the land. The list of things that Ginsburg inspired is long: two films, memes that range from the ribald to inspirational, mountains of memorabilia from t-shirts to totes, cocktails, a book on her workout, and even tattoos.

Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Martin D. Ginsburg posing for a photo: MailOnline logo © Provided by Daily Mail MailOnline logo

But beyond the persona of the 'Notorious RBG' and her groundbreaking law career, Ginsburg was a mother of two, had two grandchildren, and was married to her husband Martin D. Ginsburg for 56 years until his death in 2010. She blazed a path for women in the legal profession, and at five-foot-one had become a towering figure in Washington, D.C.

BREAKING NEWS: Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg DEAD

  BREAKING NEWS: Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg DEAD Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has died after a battle with metastatic pancreas cancer, the Supreme Court has announced. The judge, only the second woman to serve as a Supreme Court Justice, passed away Friday evening surrounded by her family at her home in Washington D.C. following complications with her illness. Ginsburg, who served for 27 years on the highest court of the land, had battled several bouts of cancer after first being diagnosed in 2009.She announced in July she was undergoing chemotherapy treatment for lesions on her liver.

How RBG became a cultural icon 02:41. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg "It was beyond my wildest imagination that I would one day become the Notorious RBG "They were both from Brooklyn," said Irin Carmon, who co-authored the book " Notorious RBG : The Life and Times of Ruth

“ Notorious RBG ” began in 2013 as a saucy Tumblr blog by Shana Knizhnik, then a law student (For the hip-hop unlettered, Notorious RBG is a play on the Notorious B.I.G., the rapper who At Harvard Law, she was one of just nine women , and she didn’t have access to one of the reading rooms.

Ginsburg battled several bouts of cancer after being first diagnosed in 2009.

Born on March 15, 1933 in Brooklyn, Joan Ruth Bader was the second daughter of Russian Jewish immigrants, Celia and Nathan Bader. Her older sister, who would later die at aged six from meningitis, nicknamed her 'Kiki' for apparently being 'a kicky baby.' Her mother, Celia, a garment factory worker, would encourage Ruth – she went by her middle name to distinguish herself from the other Joans in her Brooklyn class – to attain a higher level of education than she did.

Five things to know about the 'Notorious RBG'

  Five things to know about the 'Notorious RBG' Justice Ginsburg lived a storied life, filled with judicial accomplishments and personal friends on the Supreme Court.Ginsburg, who was born in New York on March 15, 1933, went to Cornell University and Harvard Law School before receiving her law degree from Columbia University, where she later taught.

We can talk later about who 's going to take her Supreme Court seat and when. I am minded, in the meantime, to Roe declared "violative of the due process clause of the Fourteenth Amendment" a Texas criminal abortion statute that allowed abortion only to save a pregnant woman 's life .

Incredible life of the woman who became the Notorious RBG : How Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the Brooklyn-born daughter of Russian Jewish migrants became a trailblazer, the second woman to serve as Supreme Court Justice and a feminist pop culture icon.

'My mother told me two things constantly. One was to be a lady, and the other was to be independent. The study of law was unusual for women of my generation. For most girls growing up in the '40s, the most important degree was not your BA, but your MRS,' she recalled to the ACLU, referring to the idea that women went to college to land a man, get married and become a missus - not to get a bachelor's degree.

Her mother died from cancer right before Ginsburg graduated from high school.

Republicans vow to replace Ginsburg with Trump pick

  Republicans vow to replace Ginsburg with Trump pick Senate leader Mitch McConnell said he will push ahead within hours of Supreme Court justice's death.Mr McConnell said he would act swiftly, despite the election six weeks away.

We can talk later about who ’s going to take her Supreme Court seat, and when. Roe declared “violative of the Due Process Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment” a Texas criminal abortion that allowed abortion only to save a pregnant woman ’s life .

1. The " Notorious RBG " Tumblr was inspired after a game-changing dissent After Ginsburg's dissent in Shelby County v. Holder, which denied the Voting 11. She has always been the voice of the people In addition to speaking up for gender equality, Ginsburg's legacy of rulings on human rights extend to

In 1950, Ginsburg started attending Cornell University where she would meet her husband, Martin D. Ginsburg, during a literature class taught by famous novelist Vladimir Nabokov, according to the biography called 'Ruth Bader Ginsburg: A Life' by Jane Sherron De Hart.

Martin was able to answer Nabokov's quiz question about Charles Dickens, and Ginsburg was smitten, later saying that Martin was the 'the only young man I dated who cared that I had a brain.'

'Meeting Marty was by far the most fortunate thing that ever happened to me,' Ginsburg said in one of the films about her, the documentary 'RBG.' 'Marty was a man blessed with a wonderful sense of humor. I tend to be rather sober.'

At aged 21, Ginsburg, who majored in government, graduated at the top of her class in 1954 at Cornell and married Martin soon after. Their first child, Jane C. Ginsburg, was born on July 21, 1955. Due to Martin's military service, they moved to Fort Sill, Oklahoma.

'After dinner, the newlyweds often spent their evenings reading aloud to each other from Pepys, Tolstoy, Dickens and even Spinoza, although the philosopher was tougher fare,' De Hart wrote, according to a Washington Post article about the biography.

De Hart emphasized Marty's 'proto-feminism' in the 1950s, and the couple decided they both would pursue careers. After two years in Oklahoma, Ginsburg and Martin went to Harvard Law School in 1956. Women had only started being admitted to the law school six years earlier, and Ginsburg was one of nine women in a class of about 500.

Sen. Gardner, Trailing Hickenlooper in Colorado, Backs SCOTUS Seat Push

  Sen. Gardner, Trailing Hickenlooper in Colorado, Backs SCOTUS Seat Push The Colorado senator has said he will support a "qualified nominee" who will "protect our constitution, not legislate from the bench, and uphold the law," should one be put forward.Gardner released a statement in which he outlined his commitment to voting to confirm should a "qualified nominee" who will "protect our constitution, not legislate from the bench, and uphold the law," be put forward.

Martin graduated from Harvard in 1958 and practiced tax law in New York. Ginsburg switched schools, attending Columbia Law School to be close to her husband. In 1959, she graduated with her law degree, a Juris Doctor, from Columbia, and was tied for first in her class.

a person posing for the camera: A young Ruth Bader Ginsburg, pictured here in 1977, who broke barriers in the legal profession to become the second woman to serve as a Supreme Court justice © Provided by Daily Mail A young Ruth Bader Ginsburg, pictured here in 1977, who broke barriers in the legal profession to become the second woman to serve as a Supreme Court justice

Despite the credentials, Ginsburg, now 26, was still a woman and she had a hard time finding a place at a law firm after graduation.

'You think about what would have happened... Suppose I had gotten a job as a permanent associate. Probably I would have climbed up the ladder and today I would be a retired partner. So often in life, things that you regard as an impediment turn out to be great good fortune,' Ginsburg said during the documentary series, 'Makers: Women Who Make America.'

Ginsburg was also rejected for a Supreme Court clerkship due to being a woman. But there were successes as well: she was the first female member of the Harvard Law Review and was elected to the Columbia Law Review as well. Eventually, Ginsburg landed a clerkship for a judge of the US District Court for the Southern District of New York.

After two years with the Southern District, Ginsburg was a research associate and associate director for the Project of International Procedure at Columbia Law School. She also learned Swedish, and conducted research in Sweden for a book that she co-authored on civil procedure in the country.

Protesters Gather Outside Lindsey Graham's House to 'Wake Him Up' Over Push to Replace RBG

  Protesters Gather Outside Lindsey Graham's House to 'Wake Him Up' Over Push to Replace RBG "We're here with your wake up call @LindseyGrahamSC," tweeted protest organizer Sunrise Movement DC. "RBG's seat will be filled after the election."In several videos posted to Twitter, protesters can be seen filling the streets outside of Graham's home, yelling "wake him up" while banging pots and pans.

a group of people standing in a garden: After serving as a judge of the US Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit for 13 years, Ginsburg was nominated by President Bill Clinton to Supreme Court after Justice Byron White announced he was retiring. Clinton (left) is shaking Ginsburg's hand during the announcement in the Rose Garden at the White House on June 14, 1993 © Provided by Daily Mail After serving as a judge of the US Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit for 13 years, Ginsburg was nominated by President Bill Clinton to Supreme Court after Justice Byron White announced he was retiring. Clinton (left) is shaking Ginsburg's hand during the announcement in the Rose Garden at the White House on June 14, 1993

In 1963, she started teaching at Rutgers University School of Law when there were few female law professors. Also during this time, she and Martin had their second child, James S. Ginsburg, on September 8, 1965. She taught at Rutgers until 1972 and then moved to Columbia Law School, where, at aged 39, she was the first woman put on a tenure track.

She taught at Columbia for eight years, co-authored a law school book, and also worked as general counsel for the ACLU, where she argued several hundred gender discrimination cases, six of which were before the Supreme Court.

By 1980, Ginsburg, then 47, was selected to be a judge of the US Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, which is often a springboard to the Supreme Court. After thirteen years as a judge on that court, President Bill Clinton nominated the 60-year-old Ginsburg for the Supreme Court after Justice Byron White said he was retiring.

'The announcement of this vacancy,' Clinton said on June 14, 1993, according to a YouTube video courtesy of the William J. Clinton Presidential Library, 'brought forth a unique outpouring of support for distinguished Americans on Judge Ginsburg's behalf. What caused that outpouring is the essential quality of the judge herself: her deep respect for others and her willingness to subvert self-interest to the interest of our people and their institutions.'

At the announcement, Ginsburg said: 'Most closely, I have been aided by my life's partner, Martin D. Ginsburg, who has been, since our teenage years, my best friend and biggest booster.'

Mitch McConnell Thinks Senate Has an 'Obligation Under the Constitution' to Advance Trump's SC Nominee

  Mitch McConnell Thinks Senate Has an 'Obligation Under the Constitution' to Advance Trump's SC Nominee Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said that filling the vacancy on the U.S. Supreme Court with an appointee from President Donald Trump was "very likely to happen."McConnell said hours after Ginsburg's death on Friday that a nominee from President Donald Trump would receive confirmation hearings as quickly as possible. Some Democratic lawmakers said that filling the seat should wait until after the upcoming November election. Conservative justices currently hold a 5-3 majority on the Supreme Court.

On August 4, 1993, the US Senate confirmed her by a vote of 96 to 3, the New York Times reported. She was sworn in as a justice on August 10, 1993.

Later in October 1993, a photo shows Ginsburg and her family at the court. Her daughter, Jane C. Ginsburg, followed in her footsteps, graduating from Harvard Law School, and currently teaches at Columbia Law School. She married George T. Spera Jr and they have two children together: Paul Spera, who is an actor, and Clara Spera, who is also a lawyer and clerked for the US District of the Southern District of New York.

Ginsburg told the New Republic that her grandchildren loved the fact that she had become an Internet sensation.

'At my advanced age - I'm now an octogenarian - I'm constantly amazed by the number of people who want to take my picture,' she said in 2014.

Not only did people want their photo taken, an interest in her workout also took hold. In her eighties, Ginsburg would do exercises such as a wall squat with a yoga ball. So much so that her trainer of many years, Bryant Johnson, wrote the book 'The RBG Workout.'

When Ginsburg joined the court in 1993, Sandra Day O'Connor had already been on it since 1981. Sandra Day O'Connor became the first woman to serve on the Supreme Court, nominated by President Ronald Reagan. Ginsburg called O'Connor a mentor, and Ginsburg told The Washington Post that they 'thought it would be appropriate if we included as part of our robe something typical of a woman.

'So I have many, many collars.'

Fans of Ginsburg have parsed her collars, which were sometimes lace, gold embellished and beaded. One was dubbed 'the dissenter.'

A feminist icon to many, Ginsburg told 'Makers,' the documentary series, that feminism is 'that notion that we should each be free to develop our own talents, whatever they may be, and not be held back by artificial barriers - manmade barriers, certainly not heaven sent.'

After O'Connor retired in early 2006, Ginsburg was the only woman on the court until Sonia Sotomayor was confirmed on August 8, 2009. Ginsburg was also close to conservative justice Antonin Scalia until his death in February 2016.

'We care about this institution more than our individual egos and we are all devoted to keeping the Supreme Court in the place that it is, as a co-equal third branch of government and I think a model for the world in the collegiality and independence of judges,' Ginsburg said on C-SPAN.

In 2015, Ginsburg told MSNBC how she would liked to be remembered.

'Someone who used whatever talent she had to do her work to the very best of her ability. And to help repair tears in her society, to make things a little better through the use of whatever ability she has. To do something, as my colleague David Souter would say, outside myself. 'Cause I've gotten much more satisfaction for the things that I've done for which I was not paid.'

Read more

Mitch McConnell Thinks Senate Has an 'Obligation Under the Constitution' to Advance Trump's SC Nominee .
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said that filling the vacancy on the U.S. Supreme Court with an appointee from President Donald Trump was "very likely to happen."McConnell said hours after Ginsburg's death on Friday that a nominee from President Donald Trump would receive confirmation hearings as quickly as possible. Some Democratic lawmakers said that filling the seat should wait until after the upcoming November election. Conservative justices currently hold a 5-3 majority on the Supreme Court.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks
usr: 1
This is interesting!