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Entertainment BREAKING NEWS: Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg DEAD

04:43  19 september  2020
04:43  19 september  2020 Source:   dailymail.co.uk

Obituary: Ruth Bader Ginsburg

  Obituary: Ruth Bader Ginsburg The US Supreme Court justice was a feminist heroine, cultural icon and national treasure.Ginsburg became only the second woman ever to serve as a justice on the nation's highest court.

JUST WATCHED. Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg dies at 87. The vacancy gives Trump the opportunity to further solidify the conservative majority on the court and fill the seat of a woman who broke through the glass ceiling at a time when few women attended law school with a different

Following years of health concerns, Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg died Friday at the age of 87, the court said. Ginsburg 's death could very well set up a bitter battle over her successor in the weeks leading up to the ABC News reported that Scalia often spoke fondly of Ginsburg

Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Ruth Bader Ginsburg looking at a laptop: MailOnline logo © Provided by Daily Mail MailOnline logo

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has died aged 87 after a battle with metastatic pancreas cancer, the Supreme Court has announced.

The judge, only the second woman to serve as a Supreme Court Justice, passed away Friday evening surrounded by her family at her home in Washington D.C. following complications with her illness.

Ginsburg, who served for 27 years on the highest court of the land, had battled several bouts of cancer after first being diagnosed in 2009.

Ruth Bader Ginsburg: progressive icon of US Supreme Court, dies at 87

  Ruth Bader Ginsburg: progressive icon of US Supreme Court, dies at 87 Ruth Bader Ginsburg was small in stature, but her influence was enormous -- both as a champion of women's rights early in her career and as a progressive force on the US Supreme Court. - Unlikely pop culture hero - The tiny woman with a low ponytail was a force to be reckoned in her career, and was seen by many as an inspirational figure. Her exercise regimen was turned into a workout book. Halloween costumes were popular for young girls and women alike. Sometimes, she was depicted wearing a gold crown.For Shana Knizhnik, one of the creators of the Notorious RBG blog, the justice's appeal transcended generational differences.

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg , the Supreme Court’s feminist icon, not only changed the law [Follow our live coverage of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg ’s death and the Supreme Court vacancy.] Judge Breyer was in pain from broken ribs suffered in a recent bicycle accident, and the interview did not go

No, Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is not dead . But a tweet purportedly posted by Fox News said otherwise as she was hospitalized before the But that was nothing in that or other reports about the hospitalization hinting that she was either near death or dead . In fact, as CNN went on to

She announced in July she was undergoing chemotherapy treatment for lesions on her liver.

Her death paves the way for Donald Trump to expand his conservative majority on the Supreme Court ahead of November's election.

Ruth Bader Ginsburg wearing glasses and smiling at the camera: Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg (pictured 2009) has died aged 87 after a battle with metastatic pancreas cancer, the Supreme Court has announced © Provided by Daily Mail Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg (pictured 2009) has died aged 87 after a battle with metastatic pancreas cancer, the Supreme Court has announced

Ginsburg, the leader of the court's four-member liberal wing, voiced concerns about the political impact of her passing in the days leading up to her death.

'My most fervent wish is that I will not be replaced until a new president is installed,' the legal pioneer said in a statement dictated to her granddaughter Clara Spera days before her death.

Incredible life of the woman who became the Notorious RBG

  Incredible life of the woman who became the Notorious RBG Ruth Bader Ginsburg served as a Supreme Court justice for almost 27 years. Her death at aged 87 means that President Donald Trump will be able to nominate another justice.She passed away from complications of pancreatic cancer at the age of 87.

Ruth Bader Ginsburg , the enigmatic, longtime Supreme Court justice who attained near cult-like status among progressive circles, died Friday at the age of 87 from complications surrounding metastatic Read: supreme court'S statement on ruth bader ginsburg 's death .

Liberal champion Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has been missing in action in the Supreme Court after breaking several ribs and undergoing lung cancer surgery. Owen Shroyer breaks down how this spells the end for Ginsburg ’s long career, which means a third Justice chosen by Trump will soon be a

Chief Justice John Roberts led tributes to his colleague Friday describing her as a 'champion of justice'.

'Our nation has lost a justice of historic stature,' Roberts said in a statement.

'We at the Supreme Court have lost a cherished colleague. Today we mourn but with confidence that future generations will remember Ruth Bader Ginsburg as we knew her, a tired and resolute champion of justice.'

Tributes poured in from former presidents including George Bush and Jimmy Carter and several Democrats including Hillary Clinton, Bernie Sanders and New York Governor Andrew Cuomo.

Hillary Clinton tweeted that Ginsburg, a staunch advocate for women's rights, paved the way for other women.

'Justice Ginsburg paved the way for so many women, including me. There will never be another like her. Thank you RBG,' Clinton wrote.

Bernie Sanders called her passing a 'tremendous loss' to America.

Celebrities are flooding social media with tributes to Ruth Bader Ginsburg

  Celebrities are flooding social media with tributes to Ruth Bader Ginsburg 'Justice Ginsburg paved the way for so many women, including me.'Ginsburg, who was 87, is most known for her fearless defence of gender equality and women's rights. She recently announced her cancer had returned, although she said she would remain on the Supreme Court.

Ruth Bader Ginsburg changed America long before she joined the supreme court | Moira Donegan. “During her extraordinary career, this Brooklyn native broke barriers & the letters RBG took on new meaning– – as battle cry People gather in Washington following the death of Ruth Bader Ginsburg .

Ruth Ginsburg died Sept 18, 2020. Disclaimer: -All footage taken falls under ''fair use'' of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (1998). Criticism; Comment; News Reporting; Teaching (includes making copies for use in the classroom); Scholarship and research; Parody

'Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg was one of the great justices in modern American history and her passing is a tremendous loss to our country,' he tweeted.

'She will be remembered as an extraordinary champion of justice and equal rights.'

Former president George Bush also paid tribute to Ginsburg in a statement Friday.

'Laura and I join our fellow Americans in mourning the loss of Ruth Bader Ginsburg. She dedicated many of her 87 remarkable years to the pursuit of justice and equality, and she inspired more than one generation of women and girls,' he said.

'Justice Ginsburg loved our country and the law. Laura and I are fortunate to have known this smart and humorous trailblazr, and we send our condolences to the Ginsburg family'.

Ruth Bader Ginsburg's Husband and Children Are Part of Her Historic Legacy

  Ruth Bader Ginsburg's Husband and Children Are Part of Her Historic Legacy Although Ruth Bader Ginsburg's husband Martin died in 2010, their two children, Jane and James, are alive and accomplished in their fields.Their father, Ruth's husband Martin D. Ginsburg, died on June 27, 2010 at age 78 due to complications from metastatic pancreatic cancer.

Get breaking news alerts and special reports. The news and stories that matter, delivered weekday Ginsburg 's death devastated her followers. Outside the Supreme Court on Friday night, crowds People gather at a makeshift memorial for late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bather Ginsburg on the

The Supreme Court justice , Ruth Bader Ginsburg , has died at the age of 87 after undergoing treatment for pancreatic cancer. As one of four liberal justices on the highest court, her death raises the prospect of President Trump trying to expand the court's conservative majority.

Former president Jimmy Carter also paid tribute to the 'powerful legal mind and a staunch advocate for gender equality'.

'Rosalynn and I are saddened by the passing of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. A powerful legal mind and a staunch advocate for gender equality, she has been a beacon of justice during her long and remarkable career,' he said in a statement.

'I was proud to have appointed her to the U.S. Court of Appeals in 1980. We join countless Americans in mourning the loss of a truly great woman.

'We will keep her family in our thoughts and prayers during this difficult time.'

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo spoke of the state's heartbreak over the loss over one of its own.

'NY's heart breaks with the passing of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg,' the Democrat tweeted.

'During her extraordinary career, this Brooklyn native broke barriers & the letters RBG took on new meaning—as battle cry & inspiration. Her legal mind & dedication to justice leave an indelible mark on America.'

Washington Governor Jay Inslee, also a Democrat, described her as an 'American hero' and demanded that her 'dying wish' to not be replaced on the bench until after the election be respected.

He tweeted: 'We have lost an American hero and a giant of justice.

'May we honor Justice Ginsburg's legacy by fighting for the civil rights of all Americans and respect her dying wish that she 'will not be replaced until a new president is installed.''

Petition Against Replacing Ginsburg Until Election Gets More Than 475K Signatures in Under a Day

  Petition Against Replacing Ginsburg Until Election Gets More Than 475K Signatures in Under a Day The petition, created late Friday night, asks the U.S. Senate not to replace the late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg with under 50 days left to the election."Ruth Bader Ginsburg's dying wish was that her Supreme Court seat not be filled until a new president was installed. She was a champion for gender equality, among other issues rooted in fairness and justice for all. With less than 50 days until the election and voting already underway in many states, it's important that we demand all senators pledge not to move forward with any nominee until after the next inauguration," MoveOn.org said in its petition.

His words were echoed by Senator Cory Booker who urged the nation to carry on 'her legacy of fairness and equality'.

'Ruth Bader Ginsburg was a true giant, an American hero and a warrior for justice,' Booker tweeted.

'Our country mourns her loss deeply—we must honor her by carrying on her legacy of fairness and equality.'

Tributes also poured in from those on the other side of the political spectrum.

Senator Lindsey Graham tweeted that he was filled with 'great sadness' at the news and that despite their 'many differences' he 'appreciate[d] her service to our nation'.

'It was with great sadness that I learned of the passing of Justice Ginsburg. Justice Ginsburg was a trailblazer who possessed tremendous passion for her causes. She served with honor and distinction as a member of the Supreme Court,' he wrote.

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  If Elected, Who Would Joe Biden Pick for the Supreme Court? The Democratic presidential candidate hasn't released a list of potential candidates for the high court. But legal experts say the pool of qualified prospects is small enough to make some very good educated guesses about who the former veep might nominate if he wins in November.All Biden has indicated on the record so far is a desire to appoint the first Black woman to the high court. But if Democrats make good on a threat to add justices to the high court in the event that they capture the Senate and White House in November, Biden could have an unusual opportunity to break other Supreme Court barriers on race, ethnicity and identity, too.

'While I had many differences with her on legal philosophy, I appreciate her service to our nation. My thoughts and prayers are with her family and friends. May she Rest In Peace.'

President Trump is yet to tweet about her passing however estranged niece Mary Trump urged Americans to continue her 'fight for our country'.

'Take a moment. Breathe. And then we fight for our country the way she always did for us. Or we will lose everything,' she wrote on Twitter.

Ginsburg's death gives Trump the opportunity to name her successor at a critical time just six weeks before the nation heads to the polls.

a woman looking at the camera: Ruth Bader Ginsburg in her engagement photo taken in December 1953  © Provided by Daily Mail Ruth Bader Ginsburg in her engagement photo taken in December 1953

The president has already appointed two members of the Supreme Court, Justices Neil M. Gorsuch and Brett M. Kavanaugh, in a move that pushes the court increasingly right wing.

The replacement of Ginsburg, a Democrat and women's rights champion, by another Republican will leave the court Democrats outnumbered, with six Republicans to their three.

A debate is expected to ensue over whether Trump should nominate her successor or leave the seat vacant until after the outcome of the election.

Senator Chuck Schumer tweeted Friday after the news broke of Ginsburg's death that the position should not be filled until the White House race was over.

'The American people should have a voice in the selection of their next Supreme Court Justice,' he tweeted.

'Therefore, this vacancy should not be filled until we have a new president.'

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell issued a statement saying the Senate and nation mourns for Ginsburg alongside a statement where he said Trump's nominee would be voted for by the Senate.

More Than 100 of Ruth Bader Ginsburg's Former Clerks Guard Casket at Supreme Court

  More Than 100 of Ruth Bader Ginsburg's Former Clerks Guard Casket at Supreme Court Several of Ginsburg's former clerks met her casket and accompanied it up the stone steps to the Supreme Court's Great Hall, where the celebrated jurist presided for almost 30 years.Ginsburg died September 18 at age 87 from complications of pancreatic cancer. Memorial services commenced Wednesday, with her casket arriving at the building just before 9:30 a.m. ET. NBC reporter Jake Whittenberg tweeted four pictures showing hundreds of people, all dressed in black, standing in neat lines which trailed down the front steps of the Supreme Court.

'The Senate and the nation mourn the passing of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg and the conclusion of her extraordinary American life,' he tweeted.

Ginsburg was appointed to the Supreme Court by President Clinton in 1993 and has served more than 27 years.

She leaves behind her two children Jane Carol Ginsburg and James Steven Ginsburg, four grandchildren Paul Spera, Clara Spera, Miranda Ginsburg and Abigail Ginsburg, two step-grandchildren Harjinder Bedi and Satinder Bedi, and one great-grandchild Lucrezia Spera.

Her husband Martin David Ginsburg died in 2010.

Ginsburg was born in Brooklyn, New York, on March 15 1933.

Incredible life of the woman who became the Notorious RBG: How Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the Brooklyn-born daughter of Russian Jewish migrants became a trailblazer, the second woman to serve as Supreme Court Justice and a feminist pop culture icon

by Dusica Sue Malesevic for DailyMail.com

Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the second woman to serve as a Supreme Court Justice, a legal pioneer who broke barriers for women in law, a feminist icon to many, and the recent pop culture phenomenon known as the 'Notorious RBG' has died. She was 87.

The collar-wearing octogenarian captured the public's imagination – especially for those on the left who offered everything from kale to protective bubbles to later on wearing masks on social media to safeguard her continued tenure on the highest court in the land. The list of things that Ginsburg inspired is long: two films, memes that range from the ribald to inspirational, mountains of memorabilia from t-shirts to totes, cocktails, a book on her workout, and even tattoos.

But beyond the persona of the 'Notorious RBG' and her groundbreaking law career, Ginsburg was a mother of two, had two grandchildren, and was married to her husband Martin D. Ginsburg for 56 years until his death in 2010. She blazed a path for women in the legal profession, and at five-foot-one had become a towering figure in Washington, D.C.

Ginsburg battled several bouts of cancer after being first diagnosed in 2009.

Born on March 15, 1933 in Brooklyn, Joan Ruth Bader was the second daughter of Russian Jewish immigrants, Celia and Nathan Bader. Her older sister, who would later die at aged six from meningitis, nicknamed her 'Kiki' for apparently being 'a kicky baby.' Her mother, Celia, a garment factory worker, would encourage Ruth – she went by her middle name to distinguish herself from the other Joans in her Brooklyn class – to attain a higher level of education than she did.

'My mother told me two things constantly. One was to be a lady, and the other was to be independent. The study of law was unusual for women of my generation. For most girls growing up in the '40s, the most important degree was not your BA, but your MRS,' she recalled to the ACLU, referring to the idea that women went to college to land a man, get married and become a missus - not to get a bachelor's degree.

Her mother died from cancer right before Ginsburg graduated from high school.

In 1950, Ginsburg started attending Cornell University where she would meet her husband, Martin D. Ginsburg, during a literature class taught by famous novelist Vladimir Nabokov, according to the biography called 'Ruth Bader Ginsburg: A Life' by Jane Sherron De Hart.

Martin was able to answer Nabokov's quiz question about Charles Dickens, and Ginsburg was smitten, later saying that Martin was the 'the only young man I dated who cared that I had a brain.'

'Meeting Marty was by far the most fortunate thing that ever happened to me,' Ginsburg said in one of the films about her, the documentary 'RBG.' 'Marty was a man blessed with a wonderful sense of humor. I tend to be rather sober.'

At aged 21, Ginsburg, who majored in government, graduated at the top of her class in 1954 at Cornell and married Martin soon after. Their first child, Jane C. Ginsburg, was born on July 21, 1955. Due to Martin's military service, they moved to Fort Sill, Oklahoma.

'After dinner, the newlyweds often spent their evenings reading aloud to each other from Pepys, Tolstoy, Dickens and even Spinoza, although the philosopher was tougher fare,' De Hart wrote, according to a Washington Post article about the biography.

a person posing for the camera: A young Ruth Bader Ginsburg, pictured here in 1977, who broke barriers in the legal profession to become the second woman to serve as a Supreme Court justice © Provided by Daily Mail A young Ruth Bader Ginsburg, pictured here in 1977, who broke barriers in the legal profession to become the second woman to serve as a Supreme Court justice

De Hart emphasized Marty's 'proto-feminism' in the 1950s, and the couple decided they both would pursue careers. After two years in Oklahoma, Ginsburg and Martin went to Harvard Law School in 1956. Women had only started being admitted to the law school six years earlier, and Ginsburg was one of nine women in a class of about 500.

Martin graduated from Harvard in 1958 and practiced tax law in New York. Ginsburg switched schools, attending Columbia Law School to be close to her husband. In 1959, she graduated with her law degree, a Juris Doctor, from Columbia, and was tied for first in her class.

Despite the credentials, Ginsburg, now 26, was still a woman and she had a hard time finding a place at a law firm after graduation.

'You think about what would have happened... Suppose I had gotten a job as a permanent associate. Probably I would have climbed up the ladder and today I would be a retired partner. So often in life, things that you regard as an impediment turn out to be great good fortune,' Ginsburg said during the documentary series, 'Makers: Women Who Make America.'

Ginsburg was also rejected for a Supreme Court clerkship due to being a woman. But there were successes as well: she was the first female member of the Harvard Law Review and was elected to the Columbia Law Review as well. Eventually, Ginsburg landed a clerkship for a judge of the US District Court for the Southern District of New York.

After two years with the Southern District, Ginsburg was a research associate and associate director for the Project of International Procedure at Columbia Law School. She also learned Swedish, and conducted research in Sweden for a book that she co-authored on civil procedure in the country.

a group of people standing in a garden: After serving as a judge of the US Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit for 13 years, Ginsburg was nominated by President Bill Clinton to Supreme Court after Justice Byron White announced he was retiring. Clinton (left) is shaking Ginsburg's hand during the announcement in the Rose Garden at the White House on June 14, 1993 © Provided by Daily Mail After serving as a judge of the US Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit for 13 years, Ginsburg was nominated by President Bill Clinton to Supreme Court after Justice Byron White announced he was retiring. Clinton (left) is shaking Ginsburg's hand during the announcement in the Rose Garden at the White House on June 14, 1993 Ruth Bader Ginsburg wearing glasses and smiling at the camera: 'The announcement of this vacancy,' Clinton said on June 14, 1993, 'brought forth a unique outpouring of support for distinguished Americans on Judge Ginsburg’s behalf. What caused that outpouring is the essential quality of the judge herself: her deep respect for others and her willingness to subvert self-interest to the interest of our people and their institutions.' Ginsburg (pictured) at the announcement ceremony at the White House's Rose Garden © Provided by Daily Mail 'The announcement of this vacancy,' Clinton said on June 14, 1993, 'brought forth a unique outpouring of support for distinguished Americans on Judge Ginsburg’s behalf. What caused that outpouring is the essential quality of the judge herself: her deep respect for others and her willingness to subvert self-interest to the interest of our people and their institutions.' Ginsburg (pictured) at the announcement ceremony at the White House's Rose Garden

In 1963, she started teaching at Rutgers University School of Law when there were few female law professors. Also during this time, she and Martin had their second child, James S. Ginsburg, on September 8, 1965. She taught at Rutgers until 1972 and then moved to Columbia Law School, where, at aged 39, she was the first woman put on a tenure track.

She taught at Columbia for eight years, co-authored a law school book, and also worked as general counsel for the ACLU, where she argued several hundred gender discrimination cases, six of which were before the Supreme Court.

By 1980, Ginsburg, then 47, was selected to be a judge of the US Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, which is often a springboard to the Supreme Court. After thirteen years as a judge on that court, President Bill Clinton nominated the 60-year-old Ginsburg for the Supreme Court after Justice Byron White said he was retiring.

'The announcement of this vacancy,' Clinton said on June 14, 1993, according to a YouTube video courtesy of the William J. Clinton Presidential Library, 'brought forth a unique outpouring of support for distinguished Americans on Judge Ginsburg's behalf. What caused that outpouring is the essential quality of the judge herself: her deep respect for others and her willingness to subvert self-interest to the interest of our people and their institutions.'

At the announcement, Ginsburg said: 'Most closely, I have been aided by my life's partner, Martin D. Ginsburg, who has been, since our teenage years, my best friend and biggest booster.'

On August 4, 1993, the US Senate confirmed her by a vote of 96 to 3, the New York Times reported. She was sworn in as a justice on August 10, 1993.

Later in October 1993, a photo shows Ginsburg and her family at the court. Her daughter, Jane C. Ginsburg, followed in her footsteps, graduating from Harvard Law School, and currently teaches at Columbia Law School. She married George T. Spera Jr and they have two children together: Paul Spera, who is an actor, and Clara Spera, who is also a lawyer and clerked for the US District of the Southern District of New York.

Ginsburg told the New Republic that her grandchildren loved the fact that she had become an Internet sensation.

'At my advanced age - I'm now an octogenarian - I'm constantly amazed by the number of people who want to take my picture,' she said in 2014.

Not only did people want their photo taken, an interest in her workout also took hold. In her eighties, Ginsburg would do exercises such as a wall squat with a yoga ball. So much so that her trainer of many years, Bryant Johnson, wrote the book 'The RBG Workout.'

When Ginsburg joined the court in 1993, Sandra Day O'Connor had already been on it since 1981. Sandra Day O'Connor became the first woman to serve on the Supreme Court, nominated by President Ronald Reagan. Ginsburg called O'Connor a mentor, and Ginsburg told The Washington Post that they 'thought it would be appropriate if we included as part of our robe something typical of a woman.

'So I have many, many collars.'

Fans of Ginsburg have parsed her collars, which were sometimes lace, gold embellished and beaded. One was dubbed 'the dissenter.'

A feminist icon to many, Ginsburg told 'Makers,' the documentary series, that feminism is 'that notion that we should each be free to develop our own talents, whatever they may be, and not be held back by artificial barriers - manmade barriers, certainly not heaven sent.'

After O'Connor retired in early 2006, Ginsburg was the only woman on the court until Sonia Sotomayor was confirmed on August 8, 2009. Ginsburg was also close to conservative justice Antonin Scalia until his death in February 2016.

'We care about this institution more than our individual egos and we are all devoted to keeping the Supreme Court in the place that it is, as a co-equal third branch of government and I think a model for the world in the collegiality and independence of judges,' Ginsburg said on C-SPAN.

In 2015, Ginsburg told MSNBC how she would liked to be remembered.

'Someone who used whatever talent she had to do her work to the very best of her ability. And to help repair tears in her society, to make things a little better through the use of whatever ability she has. To do something, as my colleague David Souter would say, outside myself. 'Cause I've gotten much more satisfaction for the things that I've done for which I was not paid.'

Read more

Video: Jon Meacham: Ruth Bader Ginsburg represented ‘the best of a devotion to the American experiment’ (NBC News)

More Than 100 of Ruth Bader Ginsburg's Former Clerks Guard Casket at Supreme Court .
Several of Ginsburg's former clerks met her casket and accompanied it up the stone steps to the Supreme Court's Great Hall, where the celebrated jurist presided for almost 30 years.Ginsburg died September 18 at age 87 from complications of pancreatic cancer. Memorial services commenced Wednesday, with her casket arriving at the building just before 9:30 a.m. ET. NBC reporter Jake Whittenberg tweeted four pictures showing hundreds of people, all dressed in black, standing in neat lines which trailed down the front steps of the Supreme Court.

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