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Entertainment A look at artists who've objected to Trump using their songs

20:47  27 october  2020
20:47  27 october  2020 Source:   ap.org

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From classic American rockers to British artists to the estates of late legends, here's a look at some of the musicians who have objected to Donald Trump using their songs at campaign events.

FILE - Pharrell Williams attends the world premiere of © Provided by Associated Press FILE - Pharrell Williams attends the world premiere of "The Black Godfather," in Los Angeles on June 3, 2019. Dozens of artists have objected to Donald Trump using their music in his two presidential campaigns. Williams sent a cease-and-desist letter after his song ”Happy" was played at a Trump rally in 2018. He was especially angered that the event was hours after a mass shooting at a Pittsburgh synagogue. (Photo by Mark Von Holden/Invision/AP, File)

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FILE - In this Feb. 15, 2016 file photo, Adele arrives at the 58th annual Grammy Awards in Los Angeles. Adele is among several musicians who are objecting to their songs being used at President Donald Trump's campaign rallies. Adele made her objections clear when she learned her songs, “Rolling in the Deep” and “Skyfall,” were playing at Trump rallies.   (Photo by Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP, File) © Provided by Associated Press FILE - In this Feb. 15, 2016 file photo, Adele arrives at the 58th annual Grammy Awards in Los Angeles. Adele is among several musicians who are objecting to their songs being used at President Donald Trump's campaign rallies. Adele made her objections clear when she learned her songs, “Rolling in the Deep” and “Skyfall,” were playing at Trump rallies. (Photo by Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP, File)

Some classic rockers say not only do they oppose Trump using their music, the choice of songs is ironic or downright wrong. John Fogerty, who last week sent the campaign a cease-and-desist letter over the use of “Fortunate Son” by his band Creedence Clearwater Revival, said he was baffled by the use of a song that could have been written to slam Trump. Phil Collins sent the campaign a demand to stop using “In the Air Tonight" after it was played at an Iowa rally this month. Many observers say it was an odd song to choose given that the air among the mostly mask-less people at the rally could have been spreading the coronavirus. And just as he had with Ronald Reagan in 1984, Bruce Springsteen objected in 2016 to Trump blasting “Born in the U.S.A." as a patriotic anthem, when it's actually a scathing indictment of the treatment of Vietnam vets.

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FILE - Singer and fashion designer Rihanna attends the © Provided by Associated Press FILE - Singer and fashion designer Rihanna attends the "Rihanna" book launch event in New York on Oct. 11, 2019. Dozens of artists have objected to President Donald Trump using their music in his presidential campaigns. Rihanna demanded that Trump stop playing “Don't Stop the Music” after the song played at a 2018 rally. (Photo by Evan Agostini/Invision/AP, File)

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NEIL YOUNG, EDDY GRANT

Most musicians have stopped at legal threats, but a few have actually sued over the use of their songs. Neil Young filed a lawsuit in August over the Trump campaign's use of his music including “Rockin' in the Free World,” which he said he couldn't bear to hear as a theme song for Trump. Eddy Grant sued Trump in September over the use of his 1980s hit “Electric Avenue” in a Trump campaign animated video that mocked his opponent Joe Biden.


Gallery: Musicians who stopped Trump from using their tunes (StarsInsider)

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Phil Collins, Donald Trump are posing for a picture: Few presidents have polarized the world like Donald Trump. Love him or loathe him, the world's most powerful man has always been a controversial figure. At his rallies, Trump has played some of the most iconic music ever, much to the dismay of many iconic musicians. Now, with his 2020 election campaign, he's running into the same problem.Phil Collins is the latest artist to send a cease and desist letter to Trump's camp after the President's campaign blared his hit song 'In the Air Tonight' at a few of his rallies. The letter claims the song choice makes it seem like Collins is a Trump supporter, which he clarified he is not.Click through to meet  the musicians who have tried to stop Trump from using their songs.

LEONARD COHEN, TOM PETTY, PRINCE

The heirs of dead artists have been as quick as living musicians in objecting to Trump's use of songs. Tom Petty’s wife and daughters, who had been in legal squabbles over the management of his estate, came together to issue a statement in June denouncing Trump’s use of the rocker’s “I Won’t Back Down” at rallies. After “Purple Rain” was played at a Trump rally in Prince's hometown of Minneapolis in 2019, the late singer's estate publicly condemned the use of the song and said the campaign had previously agreed not to play it. The lawyers for the Leonard Cohen estate condemned the use of “Hallelujah” at the finale of the Republican National Convention, saying they had denied organizers' permission.

THE ROLLING STONES, THE BEATLES, ADELE

Artists from the UK have been as vocal about their songs as their American counterparts. The Rolling Stones objected to “You Can't Always Get What You Want” getting regular rotation at Trump rallies, threatening to sue in August and saying they had opted out of music licensing that allows campaigns to legally play songs. When the Beatles' “Here Comes the Sun” was played at the 2016 RNC, the heirs of George Harrison, who wrote the song, called it “offensive & against the wishes of the George Harrison estate.” Adele made her objections clear when she learned her songs, “Rolling in the Deep” and “Skyfall,” were playing at Trump rallies.

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PANIC! AT THE DISCO, PHARELL, RIHANNA

It's mostly Baby Boomer favorites who have objected to Trump's use of their music, but younger artists have cried foul too, sometimes with foul language. Panic! At The Disco singer and songwriter Brendon Urie sent a profane tweet that ended with “you're not invited, stop playing my song” in June after the Trump campaign played the hit “High Hopes” at a rally in Phoenix. Pharrell Williams sent a cease-and-desist letter after his song ”Happy" was played at a Trump rally in 2018. He was especially angered that the event was hours after a mass shooting at a Pittsburgh synagogue. And Rihanna demanded that Trump stop playing “Don't Stop the Music” after the song played at a 2018 rally.

FILE - In this Nov. 5, 2018, file photo, Bruce Springsteen performs at the 12th annual Stand Up For Heroes benefit concert at the Hulu Theater at Madison Square Garden in New York. In 2016, Springsteen objected to Presidential candidate Donald Trump blasting “Born in the U.S.A. © Provided by Associated Press FILE - In this Nov. 5, 2018, file photo, Bruce Springsteen performs at the 12th annual Stand Up For Heroes benefit concert at the Hulu Theater at Madison Square Garden in New York. In 2016, Springsteen objected to Presidential candidate Donald Trump blasting “Born in the U.S.A." as a patriotic anthem, when it's actually a scathing indictment of the treatment of Vietnam vets. (Photo by Brad Barket/Invision/AP, File)

R.E.M., GUNS AND ROSES

Generation X bands have been as angry as anyone about the use of their tunes. The Trump campaign has played “Losing My Religion,” “Everybody Hurts” and “It's the End of the World as We Know It (And I Feel Fine)” at rallies, to the outrage of the left-leaning members of R.E.M. “Please know that we do not condone the use of our music by this fraud and con man,” bassist Mike Mills tweeted in January. And Axl Rose has tweeted his annoyance at the songs of Guns N' Roses, including ”Sweet Child O' Mine," being used to entertain Trump rally-goers.

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FILE - British reggae musician Eddy Grant performs during the 42nd Montreux Jazz Festival in Montreux, Switzerland on July 16, 2008. Dozens of artists have objected to President Donald Trump using their music in his two presidential campaigns. Grant sued Trump in September over the use of his 1980s hit “Electric Avenue” in a Trump campaign animated video that mocked his opponent Joe Biden. (AP Photo/KEYSTONE/Jean-Christophe Bott, File) © Provided by Associated Press FILE - British reggae musician Eddy Grant performs during the 42nd Montreux Jazz Festival in Montreux, Switzerland on July 16, 2008. Dozens of artists have objected to President Donald Trump using their music in his two presidential campaigns. Grant sued Trump in September over the use of his 1980s hit “Electric Avenue” in a Trump campaign animated video that mocked his opponent Joe Biden. (AP Photo/KEYSTONE/Jean-Christophe Bott, File)

The Democracy Activists Who Love Trump .
Despite his own assault on democratic norms, the president is lauded in parts of Asia for his hawkishness toward China.Chin isn’t an American shock jock, though. In fact, he doesn’t even live in the United States. He is, instead, an early and prominent advocate of Hong Kong’s prodemocracy movement: His 2011 book, On the Hong Kong City-State, was a formative text for the localist movement, which seeks to promote and protect Hong Kong’s identity and way of life, separate from that of mainland China. Chin, a former professor, peppered his opinions with historical references to ancient Chinese dynasties and arcane tidbits from folk tales.

usr: 1
This is interesting!