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Entertainment How to read Women's Weekly online

06:05  18 february  2021
06:05  18 february  2021 Source:   aww.com.au

Thailand legalises early abortions; pro-choice groups want more

  Thailand legalises early abortions; pro-choice groups want more Changes expected to come into force this week, making Thailand more liberal on abortion than some others in the region.Pro-choice groups have met the move with muted praise. They say the amendments do not go far enough and warn that many women may still turn to risky illegal abortions unless the government also commits to raising awareness and expanding access.

logo, company name: How can you read The Australian Women's Weekly following Facebook's ban on Australian news? In many ways! Here, find out all the great ways you can get our news and stories, immediately. © Provided by Are Media Pty Ltd How can you read The Australian Women's Weekly following Facebook's ban on Australian news? In many ways! Here, find out all the great ways you can get our news and stories, immediately.

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The Indian kitchen serving an unpalatable truth

  The Indian kitchen serving an unpalatable truth The drama that unfolds in a grimy kitchen raises unsettling questions about insidious sexism within homes. "It's a universal story. A woman's struggle in the kitchen is the story of almost all women in India," says Jeo Baby, the film's director. "Men think women are machines, for making tea and washing clothes and raising kids." The inspiration for The Great Indian Kitchen, he says, came to him in his own kitchen."After I got married in 2015, I started spending a lot of time in the kitchen since I believe in gender equality. That's when I realised that cooking involves a lot of heavy lifting.

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Number of weekly COVID deaths falls - as antibody levels show vaccine impact

  Number of weekly COVID deaths falls - as antibody levels show vaccine impact The number of people who have COVID-19 antibodies has increased across the UK but there is "substantial variation" between regions, new figures show. The rates are highest in England, where around one in five adults tested positive for antibodies, with the ratio rising to one in seven in Wales and Northern Ireland and one in nine in Scotland.Having antibodies indicates that people have either previously been infected with the virus or have had a coronavirus vaccine.

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Amazon must also indicate the origin of fruit and vegetables

 Amazon must also indicate the origin of fruit and vegetables The law applies to everyone - and that is why the online retailer Amazon must indicate the country of origin to its customers when ordering fresh fruit and vegetables, just like the supermarket around the corner and the Traders at the weekly market. © Monika Skolimowska / dpa An employee of the grocery delivery service Amazon Fresh is in a depot of the company. This was made clear by the Munich Higher Regional Court and confirmed a judgment by the Munich Regional Court.

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Spanish enclave closure plunges Morocco town into crisis .
Moroccans in a town bordering a Spanish enclave face a bleak future after a smuggling crackdown plus a border closure over coronavirus fears destroyed their livelihoods. Street vendor Badr is one of thousands from the town of Fnideq who once profited from the trade in black-market clothes, food and cleaning products imported from the nearby Spanish territory of Ceuta. "We're not asking for a resumption of contraband, but for alternatives," saidStreet vendor Badr is one of thousands from the town of Fnideq who once profited from the trade in black-market clothes, food and cleaning products imported from the nearby Spanish territory of Ceuta.

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