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Entertainment Raymond Cauchetier, the photographer of the New Wave, died at the age of 101

12:50  26 february  2021
12:50  26 february  2021 Source:   francetvinfo.fr

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Emblematic set photographer of the New Wave, Raymond Cauchetier died on Monday February 22 at the age of 101, as a result of the Covid -19.

  Raymond Cauchetier, le photographe de la Nouvelle Vague, est mort à l’âge de 101 ans © Provided by franceinfo

Chabrol, Truffaut, Demy, Varda, Tavernier… Many directors have worked with Raymond Cauchetier, some of whose photographs remain legendary. He died Monday, February 22 at the age of 101, from the consequences of the Covid-19, the Galerie de l'Instant informed us, which hosted his last exhibition in 2016.

From reporter to set photographer

Exercising for the cinema in the Sixties, the one which one nicknamed "the photographer of the New Wave" was initially a military man and a great reporter. He notably carried out an important photographic work during the war in Indochina, which earned him the Legion of Honor in 1955.

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But these are really his shots of actors during and outside the shooting of films by Jean-Luc Godard or François Truffaut who made him world famous. The lovers of Breathless on the Champs-Élysées, Jeanne Moreau's race in Jules et Jim or Anouk Aimée dancing in Lola are his most famous photographs. They contributed to the popularity of the New Wave around the world.

Carried away by the New Wave

Unlike his counterparts in still photography, Raymond Cauchetier used his gaze as a great reporter to bring depth to his shots, and not to be a simple witness. "J e disturbs. I am severely criticized for my initiatives, and my image-hunter style, so far removed from the standards of still photography," he explains in an autobiographical text on his website.

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His inspiration came directly from the admiration he had for the directors of the New Wave who, for him, turned the world of cinema upside down. "The key word was improvisation. These people were reinventing cinema, but they had to make do with bits of string," he said.

80,000 photos throughout his life

Last September, the Galerie de l'Instant in Paris hosted what was his last exhibition, specially organized to celebrate the artist's 100th spring.

According to his wife, Kaoru, Raymond Cauchetier would have taken more than 80,000 photos during his life. A third of these photographs are about the artist's greatest passion: Romanesque art. However, these are his few pictures of Jean-Paul Belmondo or Jean-Pierre Léaud, having toured the world for more than 50 years, which will remain for a long time to come in the collective unconscious.

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