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Entertainment Rolling Stones retire classic song Brown Sugar due to slavery reference in lyrics

03:08  14 october  2021
03:08  14 october  2021 Source:   celebrity.nine.com.au

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• In the song , recorded 1969, the rockers sing, "Gold coast slave ship bound for cotton fields/Sold in the market down in New Orleans /Scarred old slaver knows he's doing alright/Hear him whip the women just around midnight/ Brown sugar , how come you taste so good?" "At the moment I don't want to Though fans likely won't hear the song in concert while the Rolling Stones are on tour, Jagger, 78, agreed with Richards and said it was pulled for the time being. "We've played ' Brown Sugar ' every night since 1970, so sometimes you think, we'll take that one out for now and see how it goes," the

The Rolling Stones duo, Mick Jagger and Keith Richards have announced that the band will no longer be performing their 1969 classic ‘ Brown Sugar ’. The band are currently in the midst of a 13-date US tour and have not played the hit once since its start in St. Louis on September 26. Now, in a new interview with The Los Angeles Times, responding to questions about the song ’s absence from their sets, Jagger has explained that they’re giving the song a break amid all the racial discomfort and discussions of slavery that it has. “We’ve played ‘ Brown Sugar ’ every night since 1970, so

The Rolling Stones have made the decision to retire one of their hit songs from their concert setlists for the time being.

The iconic rock band, which consists of Mick Jagger, Keith Richards and Ronnie Wood, are currently on their No Filter Tour, during which they have notably left out their song 'Brown Sugar'.

"You picked up on that, huh?" Richards, 77, told the Los Angeles Times when asked why they ditched the track. "I don't know. I'm trying to figure out with the sisters quite where the beef is. Didn't they understand this was a song about the horrors of slavery? But they're trying to bury it."

READ MORE: Paul McCartney disses the Rolling Stones for a second time: 'They're a blues cover band'

CRAIG BROWN: Slurring Mick pledges pizza satisfaction...

  CRAIG BROWN: Slurring Mick pledges pizza satisfaction... CRAIG BROWN: Mick Jagger is a man of many talents, but enunciation is not one of them. Whenever his near-contemporary, Dame Julie Andrews, sings a song, every word emerges crystal clear. Even when the lyric is complicated, as in My Favourite Things, there is no question of any misunderstanding.Sir Mick, on the other hand, tends to garble his words. It is often impossible to make out what he's getting at. © Provided by Daily Mail ( Over the years, this has meant that many Rolling Stones fans have misheard even their most famous lyrics.

Brown Sugar ’s lyrics tell of slavery , rape, racism and sexual violence. Mick Jagger said the 1969 song has ‘all the nasty subjects in one go’. The song was released in 1971 and is one of their most popular. He said in 1995 that there is no way he would have written the song now. Jagger said the band decided to give the song a break, potentially returning to it. Mick Jagger and Keith Richards have announced the Rolling Stones will stop performing hit song Brown Sugar , amid discomfort about the 50-year-old classic ’s references to slavery . The band, currently on the road for a 13-date U.S. tour

The Rolling Stones will no longer perform ' Brown Sugar ' after their hit song has been labelled 'racist, sexist and stunningly offensive'. The Rolling Stones have confirmed that they have made the decision to stop performing Brown Sugar . This comes after they received criticism for the song ’s lyrics which makes reference to slavery among other topics that are considered highly sensitive. Since their 13-date tour started in September this year, they have not performed the 50-year-old classic which they last performed in 2019.

 Ronnie Wood, Mick Jagger and Keith Richards of The Rolling Stones perform onstage at Nissan Stadium on October 09, 2021 in Nashville, Tennessee. © Getty Ronnie Wood, Mick Jagger and Keith Richards of The Rolling Stones perform onstage at Nissan Stadium on October 09, 2021 in Nashville, Tennessee.

The group have performed the hit single in nearly every live gig since its release in 1969.

In the track, they sing: "Gold coast slave ship bound for cotton fields. Sold in the market down in New Orleans. Scarred old slaver knows he's doing alright. Hear him whip the women just around midnight. Brown sugar, how come you taste so good?"

Richards told the Los Angeles Times the decision was not permanent and the band hopes to perform the track in concert at a later stage.

READ MORE: Watch the Rolling Stones open 'No Filter' tour with moving Charlie Watts tribute

The Rolling Stones taken in the 1960's, from left to right, Brian Jones, Bill Wyman, Charlie Watts, Keith Richards and Mick Jagger. © Getty The Rolling Stones taken in the 1960's, from left to right, Brian Jones, Bill Wyman, Charlie Watts, Keith Richards and Mick Jagger.

"At the moment I don't want to get into conflicts with all of this s--t," the guitarist explained. "But I'm hoping that we'll be able to resurrect the babe in her glory somewhere along the track."

Frontman Jagger confirmed: "We've played 'Brown Sugar' every night since 1970, so sometimes you think, 'We'll take that one out for now and see how it goes'. We might put it back in."

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The Rolling Stones touch down at Hollywood Burbank Airport .
The Rolling Stones touched down at Hollywood Burbank Airport on Monday ahead of their anticipated gigs at SoFi Stadium.The rock icons - Sir Mick Jagger, 78, Keith Richards, 77, and Ronnie Wood, 74 - looked in very high spirits as they prepared to continue the North American leg of their No Filter Tour.

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