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Entertainment British Museum leads the British Museum via Parthenon-Marble

21:40  03 december  2022
21:40  03 december  2022 Source:   tagesspiegel.de

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According to the report,

and the Greek government, according to media reports, have secret talks about a possible return of the Parthenon Marbor issued in London to Greece. The "delicate" conversations between the board of trustees George Osborne and the Greek Prime Minister Kyriako's Mitsotakis are "in an advanced stage", reported the Greek daily "Ta Nea" on Saturday. However, representatives from Athens had warned that the negotiations could come to a standstill at the last moment.

Das British Museum und die griechische Regierung führen nach Medienberichten Geheimgespräche über eine mögliche Rückkehr der in London ausgestellten Parthenon-Marmore nach Griechenland. © Olga Maltseva The British Museum and the Greek government, according to media reports, have secret talks about a possible return of the Parthenon Marbor issued in London to Greece.

The sculptures are also known as elgin marble. In the early 19th century, workers had removed the frieze parts from the Parthenon Temple on the Athenian Acropolis - Lord Elgin, the British ambassador in the Ottoman Empire. Elgin sold the marble to the British government, which she passed on to the British Museum in 1817. There they are among the most valuable exhibits.

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Athens, on the other hand, sees the marble as stolen. In addition to the return of the 75-meter-long frieze, Greece also requires a women's sculpture from the Erechtheion Temple on the Acropolis.

According to "Ta Nea", the secret talks about the Parthenon marble started in November 2021. Most recently, both sides spoke to each other this week in a hotel in London.

"A solution that is advantageous for both sides" is possible, the news agency Ana-MPA Mitsotakis. "The Parthenon sculptures can be combined again and at the same time the concerns of the British Museum can be taken into account." There is a momentum, he said. "I deliberately speak of a 'reunification' of the sculptures and not of a 'return'."

The British Museum said on Saturday that "a new Parthenon partnership with Greece" and was ready to talk to Athens about it. But "we act in the context of the laws and we won't take our great collection apart," said the museum. The Greek Prime Minister's office did not answer the AFP news agency to a request for comment.

Several Greek governments have failed to make significant progress in the dispute over the frieze parts. According to London, the sculptures have been legally acquired. In January, the British newspaper "The Times", which the British Museum had always stubbornly supported, had changed its position and spoken out for a return: "Time and conditions change. The sculptures heard to Athens. You now have to return there."

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This is interesting!