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MoneyNASA’s Kepler just spotted 18 new Earth-sized planets, but only one is worth dreaming about

06:30  24 may  2019
06:30  24 may  2019 Source:   bgr.com

Kepler Discovers 18 New Earth-Sized Planets; How Many Are Habitable?

Kepler Discovers 18 New Earth-Sized Planets; How Many Are Habitable? After using a new method of analyzing data collected by the Kepler Space Telescope mission, scientists were able to discover 18 Earth-sized exoplanets. One of the planets they found could actually be habitable and might be able to sustain liquid water. Since the launch of the Kepler mission, scientists have been using the space telescope to search for planets that orbit other stars and has the same size as Earth. In total, the mission has confirmed over 4,000 exoplanets in 3,033 systems. Over 650 of those systems contain more than one planet.

NASA ' s Kepler Space Telescope may be dead, but that doesn't mean that the wealth of data it gathered doesn't still hold some untold surprises. A whopping 18 new planets are one heck of a discovery, but almost none of them would likely be habitable by life as we understand it.

NASA ' s Kepler Space Telescope may be dead, but that doesn't mean that the wealth of data it gathered doesn't still hold some untold surprises. A new research paper from scientists at the Max Planck Institute, Georg August University, and the Sonneberg Observatory is a great reminder of that .

NASA’s Kepler just spotted 18 new Earth-sized planets, but only one is worth dreaming about© Provided by Penske Media Corporation kepler

NASA’s Kepler Space Telescope may be dead, but that doesn’t mean that the wealth of data it gathered doesn’t still hold some untold surprises. A new research paper from scientists at the Max Planck Institute, Georg August University, and the Sonneberg Observatory is a great reminder of that, and it reveals the existence of 18 (!) completely new exoplanets that were previously unknown to astronomers.

The discovery was made after a careful analysis of Kepler data using a new method of approach that is more sensitive and could, its creators believe, uncover dozens or even over a hundred totally new worlds orbiting distant stars.

18 Earth-size planets found in our galaxy—all hiding in plain sight

18 Earth-size planets found in our galaxy—all hiding in plain sight And a hundred more small worlds may be awaiting discovery, astronomers predict, thanks to a new method for combing through NASA data.

The 18 exoplanets are Earth sized and include the smallest known planet so far and one that looks like it Most of these new planets were orbiting their stars very closely and were extremely hot apart from one Nasa sent the Kepler space telescope into orbit with the purpose of finding Earth sized .

NASA ' s Kepler Space Telescope may be dead, but that doesn't mean that the wealth of data it gathered doesn't still hold some untold surprises. A new research paper from scientists at the Max Planck Institute, Georg August University, and the Sonneberg Observatory is a great reminder of that .

Typically, data exoplanet-hunting hardware is scanned for changes in star brightness that could indicate the presence of a planet. However, this can make it difficult to spot smaller planets, like those similar in size to Earth.

“Standard search algorithms attempt to identify sudden drops in brightness,” Dr. Rene Heller, first author of the research published in Astronomy & Astrophysics, said in a statement. “In reality, however, a stellar disk appears slightly darker at the edge than in the center. When a planet moves in front of a star, it therefore initially blocks less starlight than at the mid-time of the transit. The maximum dimming of the star occurs in the center of the transit just before the star becomes gradually brighter again,” he explains.

A planet that shouldn’t exist was just found orbiting a distant star

A planet that shouldn’t exist was just found orbiting a distant star When astronomers search for exoplanets they rarely know what they're going to find, but that doesn't mean there aren't rules that would-be planets are expected to follow. Depending on their distance from their host star, any given planet will fall into one of several categories… or at least that’s what scientists have come to expect. NGTS-4b, a newly-discovered world orbiting a distant star, doesn’t follow many of the rules that researchers thought they knew, and it’s earned the nickname “The Forbidden Planet” because of it. NGTS-4b was detected by scientists with the European Southern Observatory.

- NASA ' s Kepler mission has discovered two new planetary s Two of the newly discovered planets orbit a star smaller and cooler than the sun. Kepler -62f is only 40 percent larger than Earth , making it the exoplanet closest to the size of our planet known in the habitable zone of another star.

NASA ' s Kepler Space Telescope may be dead, but that doesn't mean that the wealth of data it gathered doesn't still hold some untold surprises. A new research paper from scientists at the Max Planck Institute, Georg August University, and the Sonneberg Observatory is a great reminder of that .

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NASA’s Kepler just spotted 18 new Earth-sized planets, but only one is worth dreaming about

A whopping 18 new planets are one heck of a discovery, but almost none of them would likely be habitable by life as we understand it. In fact, a full 17 of them are likely far too hot for liquid water to exist on their surfaces. That’s a huge bummer for those of us who dream of the discovery of a true “alien” world complete with its own unique forms of life.

The single outlier, a planet called EPIC 201238110.02, is quite a bit larger than Earth but still within the realm of what astronomers consider “Earth-like.” It’s at the right distance from its host star that it could likely support liquid water on its surface. This so-called “Goldilocks zone” is right where Earth sits, and it’s thought that planets in this zone of their respective stars are our best chance for finding extraterrestrial life.

Going forward, the researchers will set their sights on discovering even more previously-unknown worlds, and we’ll be hoping some more potentially habitable planets are in the mix.

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