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MoneyNASA is giving away an Apollo-era Saturn rocket

12:53  20 july  2019
12:53  20 july  2019 Source:   cnet.com

The great ocean mission eclipsed by Apollo 11

The great ocean mission eclipsed by Apollo 11 On July 15, 1969, one day before Apollo 11 launched for the moon, a crew of six men prepared to drop into unchartered and mysterious depths of the ocean. Their ground-breaking mission, onboard a strange submersible craft called Ben Franklin, was to try and unlock secrets of the Gulf Stream, one of Mother Nature's most important ocean currents. Flowing through the Atlantic Ocean, thousands of kilometres in length, the Gulf Stream affects much of the climate and life on earth.

The Saturn 1 rocket they’re “ giving away ”. Photo credit: NASA . If you find yourself in the market for a rocket , there are two things you should know about this one. The agency is still in possession of a lot of equipment from both the Apollo era and the shuttle program. Some of it can be found in the rocket

NASA 's Saturn V, the mighty rocket that launched men to the moon was first tested in 1967. See how the giant Saturn V moon rocket worked in this A total of 13 Saturn V rockets were launched from 1967 until 1973, carrying Apollo missions as well as the Skylab space station. Every part of the giant

NASA is giving away an Apollo-era Saturn rocket © Provided by CBS Interactive Inc. Coming to a park near you, if that park has an extra $250,000 in the budget. NASA

Just in time for the 50th anniversary of NASA's Apollo 11 astronauts landing on the moon, the space agency has a very big piece of history it's looking to offload.

The historic Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Alabama played a central role in developing the Saturn rockets that powered the Apollo rocket program, and apparently it had one of the earliest models just lying around after all these years.

According to documents and emails obtained by CNET, MSFC "has excessed a Saturn 1 Block 1 Booster portion of a Saturn rocket stack up."

Fifty years after Moon mission, Apollo astronauts meet at historic launchpad

Fifty years after Moon mission, Apollo astronauts meet at historic launchpad Fifty years ago on Tuesday, three American astronauts set off from Florida for the Moon on a mission that would change the way we see humanity's place in the universe. The crew's surviving members, Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins, are set to reunite at the same launchpad on Tuesday, the start of a week-long series of events commemorating Apollo 11. Their commander and the first man on the Moon, Neil Armstrong, passed away in 2012. But Aldrin and Collins, 89 and 88 respectively, will meet Tuesday at precisely 9:32 am (1332 GMT) at the Kennedy Space Center's pad 39A to kick off the festivities.

Saturn V was an American super heavy-lift launch vehicle certified for human-rating used by NASA between 1967 and 1973. It consisted of three stages, each fueled by liquid propellants.

The Saturn V was just the rocket for the job. Apollo 8 ranks as one of the most audacious and risky missions in space history. Alongside Borman in the Apollo command module were Jim Lovell and Bill Anders, who gave the endeavour just a 30% chance of success.

Related slideshow: Apollo 11's lunar landing mission (Provided by Photo Services)

NASA is giving away an Apollo-era Saturn rocket
NASA is giving away an Apollo-era Saturn rocket
NASA is giving away an Apollo-era Saturn rocket
NASA is giving away an Apollo-era Saturn rocket
NASA is giving away an Apollo-era Saturn rocket
NASA is giving away an Apollo-era Saturn rocket
NASA is giving away an Apollo-era Saturn rocket
NASA is giving away an Apollo-era Saturn rocket
NASA is giving away an Apollo-era Saturn rocket
NASA is giving away an Apollo-era Saturn rocket
NASA is giving away an Apollo-era Saturn rocket
NASA is giving away an Apollo-era Saturn rocket
NASA is giving away an Apollo-era Saturn rocket
NASA is giving away an Apollo-era Saturn rocket
NASA is giving away an Apollo-era Saturn rocket
NASA is giving away an Apollo-era Saturn rocket
NASA is giving away an Apollo-era Saturn rocket
NASA is giving away an Apollo-era Saturn rocket
NASA is giving away an Apollo-era Saturn rocket
NASA is giving away an Apollo-era Saturn rocket
NASA is giving away an Apollo-era Saturn rocket
NASA is giving away an Apollo-era Saturn rocket
NASA is giving away an Apollo-era Saturn rocket
NASA is giving away an Apollo-era Saturn rocket
NASA is giving away an Apollo-era Saturn rocket
NASA is giving away an Apollo-era Saturn rocket
NASA is giving away an Apollo-era Saturn rocket
NASA is giving away an Apollo-era Saturn rocket
NASA is giving away an Apollo-era Saturn rocket
NASA is giving away an Apollo-era Saturn rocket
NASA is giving away an Apollo-era Saturn rocket

The booster is the bottom or first stage of the Saturn I, which was the United States' first heavy-lift rocket, developed in the early 1960s. It was the more massive fifth version, or Saturn V, that would send Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins on their trip to the moon in 1969.

Presumably, this rocket never flew since the standard practice for all NASA launches prior to the emergence of SpaceX was to allow spent boosters to fall in the ocean.

So this is basically an unused, genuine space rocket being given away to interested schools, universities, museum or libraries for free. All any interested organization has to do is pay for shipping, which happens to cost a quarter million dollars in this case.

NASA occasionally offers free artifacts to schools and museums through the federal government's General Services Administration. In fact, it's currently also trying to get rid of some old space shuttle tiles and astronaut food packets.

If the $250,000 shipping and handling fees for a rocket are a little steep for your burgeoning space museum, you might do better to start building your exhibit around some nice shuttle tiles, which can be had for one ten-thousandth the cost, or about $25 in shipping costs.

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