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Money SpaceX denies Falcon rocket caused secret Zuma mission failure

08:09  10 january  2018
08:09  10 january  2018 Source:   usatoday.com

Secret spy satellite fails to keep orbit after SpaceX launch

  Secret spy satellite fails to keep orbit after SpaceX launch The launch of “Zuma,” the costly top secret spy satellite aboard SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket, was a bust, according to a report Monday. The mysterious payload failed to keep a low orbit and likely plunged through the Earth’s atmosphere after being launched Sunday from Florida's Space Coast, the Wall Street Journal reported, citing sources close to the bungled mission.The purpose of the government spacecraft is not known but it was believed to be worth billions, the paper reported.

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket carrying the government's secret Zuma payload flew from Launch Complex 40 at Canaveral Air Force Station at 8 p.m. Sunday. In a statement Tuesday, SpaceX said the Falcon 9 “did everything correctly” during Sunday night’s launch of the mission called Zuma from

CAPE CANAVERAL — SpaceX ’s Falcon 9 rocket “did everything correctly” during Sunday night’s launch of the government’s classified Zuma satellite from Cape Canaveral, the company said in a statement Tuesday that attempted to beat back rumors it might be responsible for a failed mission .

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SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket “did everything correctly” during Sunday night’s launch of the government’s classified Zuma satellite from Cape Canaveral, the company said in a statement Tuesday that attempted to beat back rumors it might be responsible for a failed mission.

U.S. spy satellite believed destroyed after failing to reach orbit: officials

  U.S. spy satellite believed destroyed after failing to reach orbit: officials A U.S. spy satellite that was launched from Cape Canaveral, Florida, aboard a SpaceX rocket on Sunday failed to reach orbit and is assumed to be a total loss, two U.S. officials briefed on the mission said on Monday. The classified intelligence satellite, built by Northrop Grumman Corp, failed to separate from the second stage of the Falcon 9 rocket and is assumed to have broken up or plunged into the sea, said the two officials, who spoke on condition of anonymity.The satellite is assumed to be "a write-off," one of the officials said.The presumed loss of the satellite was first reported by the Wall Street Journal.

SpaceX ’s Falcon 9 rocket , carrying the Zuma satellite into orbit. Late Sunday night, SpaceX appeared to successfully launch a classified satellite named Zuma for some unknown government agency — but it’s possible the mysterious spacecraft may have been lost once in space .

CAPE CANAVERAL — SpaceX ’s Falcon 9 rocket “did everything correctly” during Sunday night’s launch of the government’s classified Zuma satellite from Cape Canaveral, the company said in a statement Tuesday that attempted to beat back rumors it might be responsible for a failed mission .

“Information published that is contrary to this statement is categorically false,” said Gwynne Shotwell, chief operating officer of Hawthorne, Calif.-based SpaceX. “Due to the classified nature of the payload, no further comment is possible.”

SpaceX issued the statement in response to reports on Twitter and by some news outlets, not officially confirmed, that the secret satellite fell into the ocean after the Sunday blastoff from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station.

Shotwell said the company's defense of the Falcon 9 was based on “review of all data to date,” and it would report any new information changing that assessment.

But the vigorous defense of the rocket implied that if the Zuma mission did fail, it was because of a problem with the spacecraft built by Northrop Grumman, which has not commented on the mission’s status.

SpaceX denies Falcon rocket caused secret Zuma mission failure

  SpaceX denies Falcon rocket caused secret Zuma mission failure There were reports that the Zuma mission may have ended in failure, but SpaceX said its Falcon 9 rocket "did everything correctly."“Information published that is contrary to this statement is categorically false,” said Gwynne Shotwell, chief operating officer of Hawthorne, Calif.-based SpaceX. “Due to the classified nature of the payload, no further comment is possible.

Fate of secret satellite a mystery amid reports of failure . SpaceX mission commentary covered the initial minutes of the launch, ignition of the rocket 's second stage, jettison of a protective The SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket -- the most powerful ever -- is being prepped for its maiden flight later this month.

SpaceX 's Falcon 9 rocket will lift off from Cape Canaveral on 5 January, buy mystery surrounds the Zuma mission as no one appears to know what the First Rocket Launch of 2018 with SpaceX Falcon 9 and Zuma Payload - Продолжительность: 10:05 Space Videos 117 116 просмотров.

a star filled sky: Colorful contrails are created as the second stage of a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket begins its ascent and the first stage descends after liftoff from Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station at 8 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 7, 2018. The rocket was carrying the classified Zuma payload for the U.S. Government. © Craig Bailey, FLORIDA TODAY-USA TODAY NETWORK Colorful contrails are created as the second stage of a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket begins its ascent and the first stage descends after liftoff from Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station at 8 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 7, 2018. The rocket was carrying the classified Zuma payload for the U.S. Government. The Wall Street Journal and Reuters — citing officials who spoke on condition of anonymity — earlier reported the satellite is presumed "to be a total loss."

SpaceX cut off its launch broadcast after confirming that the rocket's nose cone — the cause of a delay to a planned November launch — had separated a few minutes after the 8 p.m. ET blastoff from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. That's standard procedure during secret national security missions.

But neither SpaceX nor Northrop later confirmed the launch was ultimately a success, as United Launch Alliance typically does for its classified missions.

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A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launches the Zuma mission for an unspecified U.S. government agency on Jan. The rocket lifted off from Cape Canaveral's Space Launch Complex 40.) SpaceX has stressed that any blame for the Zuma failure — if indeed the mission failed — falls on someone else's

SpaceX Secret Zuma Launch - SpaceX landing of first stage booster night time - Продолжительность: 12:55 Space Videos 6 907 просмотров. Alien UFO Taking Out Space X Falcon 9 Elon Musk Rocket On The Way To ISS - Продолжительность: 5:41 Igor Kryan 3 777 600 просмотров.

SpaceX CEO Elon Musk on Monday shared a long-exposure photo of the Falcon launch and landing taken by Satellite Beach High student John Kraus, with no indication that anything was amiss.

Marco Langbroek, an amateur satellite tracker from the Netherlands who was closely watching Zuma, said evidence shows the rocket’s upper stage did achieve orbit.

He noted that U.S. military’s Joint Space Operations Center, which tracks objects in space, did catalog an object designated “payload,” meaning something completed at least one orbit.

If something went wrong — “a big ‘if’ – I am skeptical,” he wrote in a blog post — it could be that the spacecraft ended up in the wrong orbit, that it did not work after separating from the rocket, or that it failed to separate from the Falcon 9’s upper stage at all.

Of those scenarios, he said, the third appears to be the most plausible.

The Falcon rocket’s upper stage vented excess fuel and was dropped from orbit on purpose, a standard procedure to minimize space junk. If the satellite was still attached, it would not have been salvageable.

Spy satellite launched from California

  Spy satellite launched from California A United Launch Alliance Delta 4 rocket boosted a new spy satellite into space from California FridayRunning a day late because of glitches with ground systems, the United Launch Alliance Delta 4 rocket carrying the classified NROL-47 spacecraft lifted away from launch complex 6 at 2:11 p.m. PST (GMT-7; 5:11 p.m. EST) and quickly shot away to the south over the Pacific Ocean.

A secret spacecraft launched by a SpaceX rocket on Sunday failed to enter a stable orbit and It was not immediately clear if the failure of this mission was due to problems with the SpaceX rocket , or Falcon Heavy is SpaceX 's massive new rocket that will boast three times the thrust of the Falcon 9.

SpaceX lofted the super- secret Zuma spacecraft for the U.S. government tonight (Jan. 7), successfully executing a mission that also featured yet another A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket carrying the secret Zuma spacecraft for the U.S. government launches Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral

a boat that is lit up at night: A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launches from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station with the secretive Zuma payload on Sunday, Jan. 7, 2018. The first stage can be seen returning to land between the boat masts. © MALCOLM DENEMARK/FLORIDA TODAY A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launches from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station with the secretive Zuma payload on Sunday, Jan. 7, 2018. The first stage can be seen returning to land between the boat masts.

From the Space Coast, bluish-white light appeared to swirl in the sky as the rocket’s upper-stage engine ignited some 50 miles up, about two-and-a-half minutes after liftoff, and the first stage began flying back to the Cape for a landing.

But while striking, the visuals likely were the result of what meteorologists said were relatively common weather conditions.

Viewers saw light from the Falcon 9 engines glowing and diffracted through a pair of thin cloud decks, one at 4,000 feet and another at roughly 20,000 to 25,000 feet, said Tony Cristaldi, senior meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Melbourne.

The clouds were more widespread along the Falcon 9’s northeasterly path over the Atlantic Ocean, but broken up at the coast, which provided unobstructed views throughout the rocket’s rise and the booster’s descent to a landing.

The glow from the Merlin engines was accentuated in the same way that light reflecting off high clouds at sunrise or sunset is often particularly picturesque.

person standing in a parking lot: A hair salon worker photographs the light display of SpaceX's Falcon 9 rocket launch, Friday, Dec. 22, 2017, in Apple Valley, Calif. The launch was more than 200 miles from Apple Valley yet was still brilliantly visible. The Falcon 9 booster lifted off from coastal Vandenberg Air Force Base, carrying the latest batch of satellites for Iridium Communications. © James Quigg, AP A hair salon worker photographs the light display of SpaceX's Falcon 9 rocket launch, Friday, Dec. 22, 2017, in Apple Valley, Calif. The launch was more than 200 miles from Apple Valley yet was still brilliantly visible. The Falcon 9 booster lifted off from coastal Vandenberg Air Force Base, carrying the latest batch of satellites for Iridium Communications.

“The illumination of the rocket plume would cause similar effects as it’s passing through those clouds,” said Cristaldi.

This Year’s Corporate Space Race: Getting Ready for Astronauts, Then Tourists

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There were reports that the Zuma mission may have ended in failure , but SpaceX said its Falcon 9 rocket "did everything correctly."        

SpaceX successfully launched the secretive Zuma mission from Cape Canaveral on Sunday, Jan. 7, 2018 and landed the Falcon 9 rocket ’s first stage.

Sunday night’s show was eye-catching, at least briefly, but didn't top the dramatic scene Southern California residents took in recently when a Falcon 9 blasted off near sunset on Dec. 22.

Light from the setting sun enveloped the rocket plume in a white bubble with a comet-like tail that transfixed viewers and went viral on social media. Musk played along with jokes about UFOs and aliens during the successful launch of Iridium satellites.

That phenomenon is known as noctilucent clouds.

a star filled sky: On Sept. 2, 2015, a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket carrying the Navy's MUOS-4 satellite lit up the sky after launching from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station at 6:18 a.m. © Craig Rubadoux/FLORIDA TODAY On Sept. 2, 2015, a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket carrying the Navy's MUOS-4 satellite lit up the sky after launching from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station at 6:18 a.m. SpaceX has been preparing for tests and a debut launch of its Falcon Heavy rocket, and for another satellite launch as soon as late January.

Shotwell said SpaceX planned to proceed with its launch schedule "since the data reviewed so far indicates that no design, operational or other changes are needed."

That includes the debut launch of its Falcon Heavy rocket from Kennedy Space Center. A test-firing of the rocket’s 27 main engines is possible as soon as Wednesday afternoon.

Another Falcon 9 launch of a communications satellite from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station is planned within three weeks.

ULA is preparing to kick off its 2018 launch schedule with a Wednesday flight of a classified National Reconnaissance Office mission from California on a Delta IV rocket. That will be followed by a Jan. 18 night launch from the Cape of an Atlas V rocket and U.S. missile warning satellite.

Delays and safety concerns mar NASA’s plans to fly astronauts on commercial spacecraft .
NASA’s ambitious initiative to fly astronauts on commercial spacecraft continues to suffer from schedule delays, as well as questions regarding the program’s safety — and Congress isn’t happy about it. As part of the program, two companies — Boeing and SpaceX — are developing spacecraft to ferry NASA astronauts to and from the International Space Station. When these two companies were selected by NASA back in 2014, the goal was to start flying crews to the station as early as 2017. But 2017 has come and gone, and the target dates keep moving.

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