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Money Facebook alerts 14M to privacy bug that changed status composer to public

11:32  08 june  2018
11:32  08 june  2018 Source:   techcrunch.com

Tim Cook says Apple has never received user data from Facebook

  Tim Cook says Apple has never received user data from Facebook Facebook was once again under the privacy spotlight yesterday, when the New York Times published a report suggesting the company had given at least 60 device makers access to sensitive user data. The original report claims that Facebook struck partnerships with device makers so that they could "recreate a Facebook-like experience" with features such as messaging and "like" buttons without the need for an app. But, it claimed, in facilitating this these third parties could also access other information on users, such as events they planned to attend, and religious and political beliefs.

A bug in May accidentally changed the suggested privacy setting for status updates to public from whatever users had set it to last, potentially causing them to post sensitive “We recently found a bug that automatically suggested posting publicly when some people were creating their Facebook posts.

Facebook has landed itself in yet another self-inflicted privacy debacle. From a report: Facebook 's Chief Privacy Officer Erin Egan wrote to TechCrunch in a statement: "We recently found a bug that automatically suggested posting publicly when some people were creating their Facebook posts.

  Facebook alerts 14M to privacy bug that changed status composer to public © Jaap Arriens/NurPhoto via Getty Images Facebook has another privacy screwup on its hands. A bug in May accidentally changed the suggested privacy setting for status updates to public from whatever users had set it to last, potentially causing them to post sensitive friends-only content to the whole world. Facebook is now notifying 14 million people around the world who were potentially impacted by the bug to review their status updates and lock them down tighter if need be.

a screenshot of a cell phone© Provided by TechCrunch

Facebook's Chief Privacy Officer Erin Egan wrote to TechCrunch in a statement: We recently found a bug that automatically suggested posting publicly when some people were creating their Facebook posts. We have fixed this issue and starting today we are letting everyone affected know and asking them to review any posts they made during that time. To be clear, this bug did not impact anything people had posted before – and they could still choose their audience just as they always have. We’d like to apologize for this mistake”.

Why Twitter Started Banning Some Of Its Youngest Users

  Why Twitter Started Banning Some Of Its Youngest Users Twitter, in an effort to comply with the European Union's privacy-centric General Data Protection Regulation, has begun to suspend accounts belonging users who were under the age of 13 when they first signed up. While the cynic in me is all for Twitter cleansing its service of youths, it isn't exactly implementing age restriction as you might think. In effect, Twitter is engaging in some retroactive account suspension, forcing some users now over 13 to create brand new accounts. Sorry about your personal brand, teens.

A bug in May accidentally changed the suggested privacy setting for status updates to public from whatever users had set it to last, potentially causing them to post sensitive “We recently found a bug that automatically suggested posting publicly when some people were creating their Facebook posts.

A bug in May accidentally changed the suggested privacy setting for status updates to public from Facebook is now notifying 14 million potentially people impacted by the bug to review their status The issue has now been fixed, and everyone’s status composer has been changed back to default

a screenshot of a cell phone© Provided by TechCrunch

The bug was active from May 18th to May 27th, with Facebook able start rolling out a fix on May 22nd. It happened because Facebook was building a 'featured items' option on your profile that highlights photos and other content. These featured items are publicly visible, but Facebook inadvertently extended that setting to all new posts from those users.

The issue has now been fixed, and everyone's status composer has been changed back to default to the privacy setting they had before the bug. The notifications about the bug leads to a page of info about the issue, with a link to review affected posts.

Facebook tells TechCrunch that it hears loud and clear that it must be more transparent about its product and privacy settings, especially when it messes up. And it plans to show more of these types of alerts to be forthcoming about any other privacy issues it discovers in the future.

Snapchat plans to launch a developer kit to let other apps access its AR camera

  Snapchat plans to launch a developer kit to let other apps access its AR camera Snapchat’s best features may soon be coming to third-party apps. TechCrunch reports that Snap Inc. is looking to launch a developer platform that would grant third-party app developers access to Snapchat’s login system and its augmented reality camera features, in addition to Bitmoji avatars. For years, Snapchat has remained a relatively closed platform, as Snap has guarded the app’s user base from data-hungry app developers looking to hawk products and services to its coveted teen demographic.

A bug in May accidentally changed the suggested privacy setting for status updates to public from Facebook is now notifying 14 million people around the world who were potentially impacted by the The issue has now been fixed, and everyone’s status composer has been changed back to default

Facebook has another privacy screw-up on its hands. A bug in May accidentally changed the suggested privacy setting for status updates to public from “We recently found a bug that automatically suggested posting publicly when some people were creating their Facebook posts.

Facebook depends on trust in its privacy features to keep people sharing. If users are worried their personal photos, sensitive status updates, or other content could leak out to the public and embarrass them or damage their reputation, they'll stay silent.

With all the other issues swirling after the Cambridge Analytica scandal, this bug shows that Facebook's privacy issues span both poorly thought-out policies and technical oversights. It moved too fast, and it broke something.

Twitter vows to reinstate some accounts suspended by age restrictions .
Accounts created by those under 13 were frozen due to GDPR, but some of those users are a bit older now.Twitter's rules prohibit anyone under the age of 13 to create accounts, and changes the social media platform made in response to a recently enacted EU privacy protection law automatically began locking down accounts of by users who identified themselves as being under the age of 13 when their account was created. Problem is, some of them weren't too young anymore.

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